drake

Temperature and airbrushing...

8 posts in this topic

Hi, I have I hope a simple question. I have picked up an airbrush and hopefully will begin learning how to use it soon. I had planned to wait for the weather to warm up since my shop isn't heated, but I have a guy asking for a simple paint scheme on some rat'l traps. So my question is, What is the ideal temperature for airbrushing baits? I'll be using createx paints...

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Oh and since I don't have my station set up yet and I'll likely only be doing 1 to 2 baits at a time. Has anyone come up with a good way of drying baits without the drying motor???

thanks,

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I just walked in from painting in my 50 deg garage and the paint was noticably thicker than in warm weather. But it's no biggie. Some airbrush paints tend to thicken in cold temps but Createx is pretty good. If you feel it's too thick, just add a few drops of water to thin it. Drying baits -no need to dry paint on a lure turner. Flash dry them with a hair dryer if you want to speed drying between colors. Use the low setting so the paint won't crack or blow around on the lure. The lure turner is for leveling the clearcoat only. Alternatively, you can hang them tail down, then switch to tail up every few minutes until your epoxy starts to harden (about 30 mins with Devcon 2 Ton). It's a big plus to brush epoxy on at room temperature because it will make a much thinner coating and level better. I paint outside but taken them inside to clearcoat during the winter. Just don't get epoxy on your wife's kitchen counters or dining room table! Plenty of newspaper is the rule.

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depending on paint types. lacquers will cure in cool weather but as the above post use a hair dryer or at least try to get a small warm working area. clear coating is what really slows us up, being it was 2 below zero outside. its a pain to keep a shop heated . good luck, theres some very talented craftsmen on this site, with very good info.

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I know everyone does not have the same equipment but since I have a dedicated paint room now, I try to keep it 60 to 70 degrees (F) year round and have a de humidifier that keeps the room at 30 to 40% humidity.

Although I shoot almost 95% Laqcuer, I have vertually no problems with any paint I shoot.No matter the paint I like to shoot it thin. If possible, I think a controlled environment makes a big difference.

Blades

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Thanks guys for all the great advice. Now if I can just handle the cold long enough to paint I'll be alright...

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Why go outside????My shop is in my basement and with createx paint,there is no smell.Just make a spraybooth out of a cardboard box.

My basement is a little colder than the rest of the house so i take my paint jar and stick it in a cup of hot water.Does wonders.

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I didn't think of a spraybooth... I have never seen how this works. How do you make one and does this trap all of the paint so that none gets on the wife's freshly painted walls, floor, or anywhere else that might shorten my life??? What size box do you need?

thanks,

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You can call it a spraybooth if you want,i call it a cardboard box.

Just take a cardboard box,have one end open,hang your bait and spray.

About the wife situation,tell her you can sit it the house and paint baits or you can go down to the local watering hole and get loaded.Works for me everytime.:eek:

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