Kickerfish

Hooks on Hardbaits

9 posts in this topic

I've noticed that some of you guys put red hooks on both the front & the back of your baits. I learned something awhile back and I listened to Scott Rook talk about this subject this past weekend. Putting a red hook on the back defeats the purpose of using red hooks period. You want the fish to chase the front hook so that he gets both hooks in him, thus less chance of losing the fish. Just my 2 cents worth.

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Or maybe, doubling the amount of red, especially showing an injured tail on a baitfish doubles the attraction value, maybe more so, since an injured tail would hamper said prey's escape; and it would be especially helpful in water that is less than aquarium-clear. Assuming there is some validity in the red hook thingie, then this is argument is just as valid.

Lures, like baitfish, have most of their mass in the front half. It is logical to assume then because bass suck in their prey, that the lure or prey is usually entering the bass' mouth head first, partially because the mass will be most acted upon by the bass' powerfull water displacement food intake, which is what the bass learns makes for easy swallowing anyway. Mr angler notices, especially now that he's put a red hook on the belly of his crankbait that he's hooking a lot of his bass on that hook, and with convoluted logic, surmises that the fish are aiming for the red hook. If the red-hook-on-the-belly-only theory gives Scott Rook or any other angler more confidence in his lure, more power to them, but the "ring of truth", and the reality of the situation are often two different things.

For example, yesterday I heard Bill Dance put forth the proposition that his 1/8th ounce Booyah Pond Killer spinnerbait worked well because it simulated the bass' natural prey in farm ponds like shad, or grasshoppers, or june bugs. Then they went to a commercial where Bill was selling instructional fishing dvd's, promising to make you a better "firshamun".

June-bugs?

Dean

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Beware of those sales pitches or old wives tales. I honetsly don't think a bass "aims" for anything other than swallowing that baitfish down head first. Just my opinion though, no scientific validity.

Another contradictory (did I spell that right?) thing that makes me chuckle is to flip through a fishing catalog and read all those claims of red hook effectiveness on bass. These red hooks are on worm hooks, deep crankbaits, spinnerbaits etc. Now, flip over a few pages to the fishing line section and read the claims on how effective this new red line is because red is the first color to be filtered out by water and how it becomes invisible past 3 ft deep. I'm no rocket scientist but, something isn't adding up here.

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Haha, that is funny. I never put two and two together Kenneth. That does not add up at all. Makes you think.

-Trey

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Personally I think that the red hooks are more of a lure for the angler, not the fish. They give the angler a false sense of security. But I make lures for myself as much as I do for the fish I'm after, and they're prettier than bronze so I'll still use them.

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My thoughts exactly Pete. I don't know if they help or not, but I sure don't think they hurt. And it does make the lure look nice.

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I think red hooks can make a difference ,AT TIMES..by no means is it a magic bullet.Shallow running cranks,and top waters only..Red is the first color filtered out of the color spectrum.Usuually within the first 2-4 ft. depending on water clarity..etc.I also think it's funny seeing deep diving cranks,Jigs etc. with red hooks or diving bills..Nathan

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What has been recently proved scientifically is that although red is the first color filtered out of the color spectrum, bass and many other fish are uniquely gifted with the proper cones in their eyes with which to see the color red quite well; red is much more pronounced to a bass' eyes than a human's. Red-head, white-body, is the standard for salwater lures. Red blades have long been a secret of successful die hard night-time spinnerbait fishermen (Someone is finally marketing a night spinnerbait with red blades). When fish are on red crankbaits in many southern reservoirs, you'd better be throwin it. Red is a key color to any predator. To me it is the red line makers whose theory comes up empty in practice. Pass the flourocarbon please.

Dean

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I have not noticed much difference b/w the red and regular bronze in terms of catch rate. I like the looks of red on certain baits, but honestly think that bronze might hold a better rate in the waters I fish. Haven't kept a log to prove it.

But I'm not afraid to put a red treble on the rear of the bait. I mainly use whatever hook has the right weight to make the lure swim. For me the color is secondary. I have also noticed that sometimes hooks from the same bag/container have different weights. Not much difference, but if you have a bait finely tuned it can matter.

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