tje1989

Air Compressor

13 posts in this topic

I am going to be purchasing a Iwata HP airbrush off of ebay soon and was wondering what type of compressor is needed for this particular brush? Is there specific brands that you must buy? Since I am new to this I could really use some help. Any information would be great.

THANKS,

tje1989

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No specific brand required. The HP works well on 15-40 psi and is rated at 45 psi max. Which compressor is mostly a matter of noise and convenience. A tool compressor outfitted with a pressure regulator and moisture filter is favored by many guys due to its moderate cost but it's too loud to use indoors in most scenarios. They usually incorporate an air tank to buffer the load, which is nice. An airbrush compressor is quieter and can be used indoors but is usually more expensive. I use a Badger Cyclone that supplies 40+ psi and turns on/off according to demand from the airbrush. It's too loud to use in living areas but would be OK in a basement workroom. If you want QUIET, be prepared to spend alot more for a compressor - or perhaps go with a CO2 tank, which is silent and supplies gas with no moisture content. I've read CO2 tanks can be used for quite awhile before refilling but have no experience with them.

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All this information you supplied has been great, and I only have a few questions to ask. First, I already have a tool air compressor in my shop. Where would I get this regulator and filter? Also, how much would this cost? Another question is if I decide to go with Co2 where would I go about buying this and do these require regulators themselves?

Thanks,

tje1989

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I got mine from Grizzlydotcom, a tool company. It's their brand, 28 psi, with moisture trap & hose for $49.00 on sale, usually $61.00. Works fine with my Eclipse. Good Luck.

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Dixieart.com sells airbrush equipment as well as paints, so you might check their site for regulators/filters/etc. I've never used CO2, just saw references to it here on TU a couple of times. I'd check the yellow pages for industrial or medical gas suppliers.

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And don't forget good ol Harbor Freight. I've used one of their airbrush compressors for 3 years now. On sale it was around $65, comes with a moisture trap, regulator, and hose, and is very quiet with plenty of power for a single airbrush. If it self destructs tomorrow, I've gotten my money's worth out of it!

Dean

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I just bought a harbor freight on sale for 50.00. It is quite but it runs all the time. Glad to hear they hold up some... Hope I am as lucky.. The filter and regulator alone will run about 15 plus dollars for a good one.

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skeeter jones,

A forumite who'd had one for a long time recommended it. It makes many others look way overpriced to me.

Dean

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I believe someone on this thread said they had a Iwata Hp Airbrush. If so, what is the ideal psi to operate it? Would a compressor with 1/8 horsepower which pumps out 30psi be enough?? Let me know what your thoughts are.

THANKS ALL,

tje1989

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I (and others) use an Iwata HP+. The directions say max 45 psi. It depends on the viscosity of your paint, but I've gotten good results down to 10 psi for detailed spraying. I often use a Badger 175T for color basecoating and then go to the Iwata for shading and detail - but the Iwata will do it all if you keep it clean and use properly thinned airbrush-formulated paints.

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