scoop10

Dick Nite's clearcoat ?

8 posts in this topic

So, breaking the Devcon habit, I've done my first baits using Dick Nite's clearcoat.

For three baits, I dipped and put on drying wheel, then repeated two more times over the course of a couple of days. On two of the baits, I got a couple of slight ripples.

So, right now, I am trying three more baits just dipping and hanging.

Question for those who have used this finish or similar products before: Could the rippling have been caused because the drying wheel process actually led to some uneven drying/unneeded movement? Or, could there have been some problem related to how I dipped the baits?

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I haven't used DN but have used Famowood Duratuff and had the same result. After experimenting, what worked for me was a single brushed coat, not multiples, dried on a lure turner for the first few minutes until the solvent evaporated. Then hung while the poly moisture cures over the next 24 hrs. When I dipped and hung them, the poly would collect at the bottom of the lure and cause a rash of bubbles there. So far, I have no complaint with the single coat poly. Although it's thinner than epoxies, it is tougher, clearer and slicker and has held up well for bass fishing.

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I first tried dipping, but it flashes so quickly I couldn't control the even-ness of the coat leading to rippling as the excess begins to dry before it will drip off, or even out while revolving on the dryer. After 3 lures I abandoned dipping, and have since brushed many coats (working on my second 1/2 pint of Topcoat). Brushing allows you to keep the coating even by controlling the amount applied. It also brushes quite easily compared to an epoxy. I normally use 3 coats, applied a day apart, just to increase visual depth. I very seldom get a bubble or any other imperfection. For my money, moisture-cure urethanes such as Dicknite's are the best thing to happen to topcoats. PM me if you have any questions.

Dean

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I must be the oddball, I dip, let it drip for a few seconds (not in the can!), then spin for around 30 minutes, then I set the baits on a rack, or just leave them on the spinner.

I'm doing two coats, roughly 24 hours apart.

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My thoughts are that, each type of coating to be dried on the wheel, will have it's optimum rotation speed for even coverage.

As Dick Nites is thinner than epoxy, I would imagine that it requires a faster rotation.

A simple experiment could be set up to establish the best speed if the drying wheel operated via a 'motor dimmer' switch.

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Thanks for the advice guys. I'm going to see how a few do just dipping and drying. If I have problems, I'll take Dean and Bob's advice.

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where the ripples on the same axis of the wheels rotation?

I dip - put it on the drying wheel with a heat gun blasting it for 30 minutes, let cool for 1 hour and dip again. x3.

I had one issue where it reacted to the 'chome' model paint I had tried - it lifted the paint and rippled but that was driver error on my part.

Let us know how the next batch goes.

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