mjs

epoxy and new lures

5 posts in this topic

I'm more at the tinkering stage than the making stage, and I have just finished making my drying wheel for lures and flies from plans I read about here. My question is whether or not it is a good idea to put a coat of etex on new lures to toughen them up, or is that overkill that will hurt their action? I've tended to just fix gouges in the past as they happened, but was wondering about a more proactive approach. Some lures are pike sized, and others are walleye sized.

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As with any other modification, from adding a bit of lead, to changing hooks, it will just depend on each individual lure. When I was striper guiding, I knew a fellow guide who changed out all of his hooks on his striper lures to lighter and more expensive hooks, only to find that it changed the performance of several of his lures, including some, such as the large Cordell Red Fin, to the point that they'd no longer work at all.

It is always prudent with E-tex to use at least 2 coats, to insure adequate coverage on places on the lure where it has a tendency to "thin-out" some on even rounded edges, such as the shoulders on flat-side type crank baits, or just behind the line tie, or near the tail on some lures; on some lures built to tight specifications,this may amount to enough weight to significantly change performance. There is probably only one way to find out...

Dean

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I wouldn't do it unless you feel the factory clearcoat is totally inadequate, especially on the smaller walleye lures. I tinker with baits alot but have one rule: if a crankbait catches fish like crazy, don't change a thing. Small changes can have big effects on performance. On those special baits, only correct problems that may lead to bait failure, like a cracked clearcoat on a wood lure. On baits that won't catch - tinker until they do or discard them. If you're dealing with factory baits, there will be plenty of the latter type to play around with - unfortunately.

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Thanks for the feedback. The lures I want protected are good ones,like #9 shad raps, but I am afraid of turning them into durable junk. My tackle box is a reverse survival of the fittest. All the bad stuff never dies.

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If they were my lures however, I wouldn't hesitate to throw on a coat of dicknite's Fishermun's Lurecoat topcoat. It is very thin and very tough.

Dean

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