zuzumusky

air bubbles

12 posts in this topic

Ho to all, I'm new to this site, read a few tips on here all are helpfull....just started making my own lures got a few going....just wanted to know how to get air bubbles out when I apply the epoxy finish...thanxs your help....later from montreal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

some people breathe on the bubbles. I heat mine with a hot air gun to get a thin even coat that releases most of my bubbles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a torch, any source of carbon dioxide will do.

Sometimes what looks like a bubble is a dust particle ya just have to brush out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok, I have a question related to this air bubbles altough I use laquer for the finish.....if u use the plastic dip to seal de wood from water (as first coat) , u let the body in this plastic dip for 10 hours (lots of air bubbles geting out in this time ), then 2 days in the room to dry, after that u dip in again in the plastic solution (plastic cups + thinner) for about 4-5 times at 30 min intervals resulting a coat of plastic over the wood ... then let another 3 days (to be sure ) to dry, after that u paint the lure (with some sanding first)... then u put the epoxy top coat..... after all that , is still a chance to get air bubbles ?? :) THX

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pikeman the bubbles in the epoxy topcoat is in the epoxy itself. The air is bubbles are from mixing the epoxy and possably from the brushing.

Mixing slow to prevent the mixing of air will help. Brushing the epoxy on in one direction will help remove the air bubbles. Breahing on the epoxy like you were going to clean your glasses will help. I really dont like to use a lot of heat to remove the bubbles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:P I mixed some epoxy but never had the problem, but I mix it slow and use it for the photo foil and lips:) I thought the problem was the air from the wood and couldn't figure it out how could it come out trought the paint (don't know how I managed to think of that :whistle: ) ....then what can I say , try a hair dryer at slow speed or from distance, but I think this could rush the drying process of the epoxy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bobby mentioned the main thing, stir it slowly, and carefully apply it to reduce the amount of bubbles from the start. Can't seem to remember off the top of my head (I rarely use epoxy anymore), if an actual stirring motion, or a kind of 'lumping' motion produces less.

Mixing and applying the epoxy in a 70* (or so) environment will help as well, it will be thinner (the warmer it is), and easier to apply and mix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a smooth round jar cap, mix with a round plastic swizzle stick and try to do it at room temperature or higher. Don't fold air into the epoxy. If you have lots of bubbles or it's too thick (they usually go together), stir in a few drops of denatured alcohol or acetone. Don't overwork the surface while brushing - that introduces more bubbles - brush it in one direction and make sure every part of the lure is "wetted out" or you can get "fisheyes" or circular voids in the finish. For me, the best results are usually in summer when the epoxy (Devcon) is 80-85 deg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See my thread "woodsealer codgeman 13". Warming the finish with a hair dryer may sort it out, otherwise you have not sealed the blank properly (if it's wood) and the air in the blank is expanding-it has to go somewhere and this is where you get bubbles/blistering. Better to air dry than heat as you get a differential in air tem/pressure between inside the lure and outside air temp which causes the blank to either "suck or blow" the coating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
otherwise you have not sealed the blank properly (if it's wood) and the air in the blank is expanding-it has to go somewhere and this is where you get bubbles/blistering.

I've seen that explanation many times, and cannot say that it is "wrong" but I have painted many times on bare wood and applied Devcon 2T with absolutely no bubbling/void type problems. So I don't think it can be the only factor.

More than likely it is too stirring rapidly, wrong temperature, trying to work it too long after it begins setting, etc. JMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought a bit more.....the results I find could be explained by moisture content in the wood. Trying to do that (no sealer) on greenish wood would cause problems. You don't have to fire wood in a kiln to make it dry for certain uses.

Hot climate + no production schedule + wood stored away from water = dry wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now