Yake Bait

Big Glide Baits

12 posts in this topic

I tested an unfinished hardwood glide bait that is 10" long and in my opinion a bit too heavy. I can't seem to get a good side to side action. Other than drilling out a bit of lead, any other advice when it comes to large hardwood gliders as far as getting a good side to side swing? :worship:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im just a beginer but from the info i have gathered i think u should consentrate the lead att de front and rear of the glider and perferly as low in the body of the bait as possible. This will give the bait a wide glide if that is what u want.

If this did not help u then check out http://www.lurebuilding.nl/indexeng.html

Good luck with ur glider

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never made lures that large, but the same principles should apply. If you split the weight and mount it front and rear, I believe you will make the situation worse.

To increase the side to side or yaw action, you can reduce the depth of the body, increase the lip angle (70 deg is good), increase the lip length or use a lighter wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pete

I dont know how you weighted your glider or what wood you are using for your glider. A primary issue is how you weighted your glider as this gives it that "good side to side swing". Follow Headbangers tip & link for weighting your glider. Second thing is the wood you are using. If you are using a dense wood like oak and you are weighting it too much it will have the unwanted action of a big turd in the water. I suggest using maple or even cedar for your gliders. Hope this helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mistake HBS. I'm showing my lack of knowledge of lures.

I haven't found an article that explains gliders, may be someone could PM me with an explanation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not an expert by any means, but I've done afew gliders. The ones that I like the best that get that nice side to side action & belly roll/flash have a wider width to depth ratio. Especially when you get into the longer lengths. You didn't really give the dimentions, just length, but if the lure is too narrow vs body depth is just naturally going to be harder to get a side to side motion to. I've got some dive & rise lures that I've used 3/4 inch wide stock on & like, but for actual gliders & some countdowns I've made, I like to use 1'' to 1 1/4" + wide stock. Plus like mentioned adjust the weighting of the ends to get either a floater, neutral, slow sinker.... whatever. Wood you use & weight are factors, too, no doubt.

Just something else to consider in your design.

I've got some Mahogany glders I'm working on now. I like the weight & durability of those, but don't really like the open grain. Just gotta seal 'em up well. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. The wood is oak and is 3/4" thick. It did have too much weight and as Fishbooger stated, it acted like a turd. Only thing that I liked was that it wobbled while it sank (like a Dunwright Dancer does). I drilled out 2/3 of the lead and will go to some lighter hooks if need be. Haven't had a chance to test yet. Interesting comment on the thickness of the wood - will have to try that on the next bait.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fotunately, making a glide bait glide is easy once you know a few basic rules. First use thicker wood for any glider over about 6" long. I use 1" thick cedar. Drill three interconnecting holes at the head end of the bait about one inch in and three interconnecting holes at the tail end of the bait about one inch in. You will now have a drilled out section at each end of the bait. For baits that are less than 7 inches try drilling just two holes at each end.Put the bait in a bench vise or support it somehow so that you can drip in the lead. Melt your lead with a blow torch while holding it with pliers. Always wear safety glasses! Don't drill deeper than the centre line of the bait or it will have more roll and less side to side action. Make sure to balance the bait so that it sinks horizontally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the confusion. I use a Forstner drill bit to drill out three holes that overlap so that when I melt in the lead it will be in one larger hole. The Forstner drill bit allows you to overlap the holes without the drill bit wandering. Again, don't drill to deeply or the bait will roll like a top heavy iceberg. Riverman is the guy who taught me about weighting glide baits. I'm sure that he might be able to elaborate on the matter also.

I use screw eyes in my baits and I make sure that they aren't too close to the lead filled holes for strength reasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I follow - the multiple overlapping holes allow you to keep the lead lower as opposed to drilling deeper holes.

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now