scoop10

Another Dick Nite Lure Coat ?

14 posts in this topic

So, after going a few weeks without making any lures, I recently worked up and painted a few only to open up my quart of Dick Nite's lurecoat and discover a nice layer of solid formed across the top.

I was able to cut out the layer, but the remaining lure coat is a tad thicker than it was previously.

My questions, for anyone who would be so kind:

_ Will I be OK continuing to use what I have?

_ Did this happen because it was not sealed well enough, or because of the cold temps? Should I be storing this at room temp? (I was storing it in an unheated shed/work room, and we recently had some freezing nights.

_ Would I be better off storing the lurecoat in a glass jar?

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I left some outside once, and it thickened up quite a bit, it also changed colors slightly. This was in a jar that I had poured some extra in, so it was only a little bit and I didn't continue to use it, so I can't help you there! I did bring it back inside, and checked it a day or so later, it seemed to thin out a bit, but I never opened it again, I don't think the color ever went away.

I buy it in pints, and have been using it, then hammering the lid back on, for a month or two now, then bring it back inside, it's just as thin as it was when I got it, so I don't think the container matters.

Of interest, I couldn't get the top off of a 2oz jar once, so I got ticked and poked a hole in the top, then dipped a bait in there as usual. It took four days to develop a film like this, must have been the way the air couldn't get in the hole in the top!

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The sub-zero conditions does not sound promising, but the only way to tell if it is OK is to use it. Create a test piece, prepare it as you would a lure, undercoat, a splash of colour paint and try it.

I am not sure what you thin Dick Nite's with, someone else will be able to help you with that. Try thinning a small amount for testing. If successful, you can then thin the whole batch.

I store all my paints etc, by inverting the tin, this guarantees an air tight seal. Any leaks will reveal themselves in a couple of minutes.

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Dick Nites is a moisture cured topcoat. Dick, and some others that use it had some post on here prior to the crash. Some of the problems people had had were similar to yours. The main culprit was when people would dip there baits directly into the can and let the excess drip back into the can. If that is what you did the can would only be good for about another few of days. The surface area was increased greatly when the drips were running off and dripping back into the can. This started the curring process and it can't be reversed.

Another problem was the cans not being sealed all the way. I think Vodkamans solution with turning the can upside down should work but some of the responses were that they had to cut the can open because it had sealed so tight. Others have used a wax seal around the top of the can to insure a good seal. I think that would be the best solution considering how hard the stuff gets.

The freeze probably didn't help things either but I don't know for sure.

Storing it in glass jars might be the best way to go, and divide it up. Many of the old suggestions were that the users divided the container so it wouldn't be subject to the air till they were ready to use it.

If you call Dick Nite I am sure he could tell you where the problem started. He is one of those guys that seems to run the whole company, answers the phone and returns calls.

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I'm gonn have to disagree with the dipping, that's how I coat everything, from crankbaits to jigs, and don't have a problem with it setting up, but then again, maybe I got a special jar :)

I have a dirt floor in my shed, and when I pull the bait out of the can of DN, very lttle drips back in, I hold it over the 'floor', maybe that helps, I dunno.

Putting the lid back on - I'm not too clean with that, I hammer it back on, to the poit now that my can is disfigured, and then set a lawnmower battery on top of the can, until the stuff seals again, taking care of the irregularties. It's ugly, but I still have my Lurecoat :)

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I store mine at room temperature, can't say what freezing temps would do. I divde mine into glass jars, and seal with Teflon tape, including the jar I brush from. If I was dipping, I'd be dipping into a glass jar just big enough to do the job, and replenish from another container before sealing it when done. The key to keeping humidity-cured urethanes fresh, is to always limit, as mush as possible, exposing it to the atmosphere. I get nearly 100 % usage out of a quart can of dicknite's by keep that idea foremost in my mind. Brushing it on from a one-half or one ounce container container, like I do, certainly disturbs its volume as little as is possible, though not to say that dipping or spraying can't be done with little waste also; again, limiting atmospheric exposure is the key to long life.

You can use dicknite's until you can no longer apply it effectively, and it will work fine. It may be possible to thin it slightly to obtain a bit more life from it, I don't know, but I'm sure Dick could tell you. I do know for sure that dipping lures into the original full container, and being haphazard about keeping it sealed airtight when not in use is the quickest way to shorten its life. Doing the opposite and learning its properties and applications will reward you with what I think is the clearest, toughest, thinnest, easiest to use, bubble free, and most economical clearcoat around.

Dean

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So, after going a few weeks without making any lures, I recently worked up and painted a few only to open up my quart of Dick Nite's lurecoat and discover a nice layer of solid formed across the top.

Let me jump in here if I may...

I assume you are talking about the Top-Coat. As is mentioned above, it is a moisture-cure polyurethane, so moisture is the main culprit in hardening in the cans...

I was able to cut out the layer, but the remaining lure coat is a tad thicker than it was previously.

My questions, for anyone who would be so kind:

_ Will I be OK continuing to use what I have?

Probably, as long as you can thin it enough to make it sprayable/dippable... Are you spraying or dipping?

Use Acetone or Lacquer Thinner to thin it. It will not reverse the chemical change that has occurred, but it might make it okay to use by diluting the lumps (small as they may be). I really doubt your finish will ever be as glossy as with un-cured Top-Coat due to the thickening. It won't level as well.

_ Did this happen because it was not sealed well enough, or because of the cold temps? Should I be storing this at room temp? (I was storing it in an unheated shed/work room, and we recently had some freezing nights.

I would guess it is the lid not being replaced well enough, or pouring partly cured / used product back into the can, or leaving the can open for a while before closing it again.

Cold temperatures do not seem to affect it as long as you warm it up prior to use. I have actually frozen it - when it is very cold, you will see a lot of bubbles in it - and then warmed it back up to room temperature. The bubbles went slowly away and after it was back to normal, I sprayed it and it was as good as new.

So - I would guess that the Top Coat was exposed to moisture at some point prior to being sealed or the seal was not sufficient.

I store my gallon, quart, and pint cans upside down - this will stop any air from entering the can - of course, it makes lid seal problems pretty obvious too!

_ Would I be better off storing the lurecoat in a glass jar?

I store my production paint (top-coat included) in glass - actually whiskey and scotch bottles... Something about the neck shape inhibits air flow in the bottles (I think - I can't prove that is why) and the paints all store indefinitely with little hardening. As a matter of fact, the bottle I use to mix Top-Coat out of for painting my lures now is over 5 years old and there is less than a quarter of an inch hardened at the bottom. We let it get almost empty before refilling from the gallon, so a lot of air is in the bottle - confusing, but it works!

I actually recommend that people buy baby food jars, my 2 ounce jars, or something like that with a screw-on lid. Then pour all of your paint into the smaller glass containers - that way you don't have to open the big container every time you want to use some.

Also, this lets you keep using the same paint over a few days without contaminating (with air or thinner) the big container.

Remember to NEVER pour thinned / mixed Top-Coat back in with your unused - you will set the whole can off.

Also, during hot weather, if you have a cooler/refrigerator (NOT the one you keep your food or beer in!) in your shop, keeping it in a cooled state seems to help with life after thinning.

When you put the lids back on, always remember to clean the lids and cans off with thinner very well - I have chiseled many lids off of cans!

If any of you have questions regarding any of our paints, please feel free to post them here, send me a private message, or email me - my email address is dicknite@dicknite.com. I am more than happy to help where I can. In emergency situations, feel free to call 800-324-5651 to talk directly with me.

If you post questions here, you might send me an email to let me know - I don't come here every day, especially with fishing seasons coming on all over the country - we are running around like heads with our chickens cut off this time of year.

I really thank all of you for your support - and I try to return that wherever I can!

Dick Figgins

Dick Nite Spoons, Inc.

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Thanks Dick. I really like the top coat, despite messing it up. I think I can salvage some of what I have. I already tried it on a few more plugs, and actually it still seemed very even, clear, etc.

Still, I'll be in contact again soon. Next quart, I'll take your advice about storage, use, etc.

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Scoop10, I'm in the same boat as you with Famowood Duratuff water cured poly. Push the cured skin aside and dip some out, it will still work fine. Don't remove the skin from the container because a new skin just as thick will form pretty quickly if you do. I also thin mine with acetone as needed and it turns out as well as when the can was new.

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Doing the opposite and learning its properties and applications will reward you with what I think is the clearest, toughest, thinnest, easiest to use, bubble free, and most economical clearcoat around.

Dean

Ouch!!

For the record, it's too late for the can I have, I'm making do with a half squished container :)

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Lol, Sterling, and I was just getting ready to go buy a lawnmower battery to set on top of my dicknite's can to allow the topcoat to absorb those magical properties that keep it fresh until use...do you use a fully charged battery???

:) Dean

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It's what I has laying around to keep the lid on until it gets dry enough to seal itself :)

For the record, the battery is 3 years old, and has no acid left in it!

I actually have a fresh can, ordered it once I beat the old can down some, I figured it wouldn't last long, but it has.

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