bdhaeh

How to paint a shad swimbait?

9 posts in this topic

I need some help from youse guys. I have a really neat four piece swimbait that I initially photo-finished with a shad picture. I pretty much wore the devcon out on the joints, so I stripped it and tried to paint a shad on the bait. Well, I just cannot find the right color combo. Is there a paint that is white metallic shiny like? If not, could someone please help point me in the right direction? Many thanks for all of the knowlege on this board and the willingness to help folks out.

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You might consider starting with a silver base coat, then thin the white out and slowly fade a layer over the silver. Then add whatever other colors appeal to you ina shad bait...blue, gold, purple, etc.

Usually less is more when trying to emulate gizzard shad or threadfin shad.

Don't forget to add the kill dot on the shoulder of the bait toward the back about the same level as the eyes on the bait.

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Fatfingers, may I ask what is the purpose of a kill dot on the shoulder of the crankbait? Do such lures atract more strikes or could it be considered just a psycological aspect of the luremaker? Has anyone tested lures with kill dot agains lures without it ?

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Rofish, the threadfin shad and the gizzard shad are common baitfish in many parts of the United States and are the food source for many species of freshwater fish.

Both species have a dot on the shoulder behind the eye. Many bait makers, both commercial and basement guys like us, have adapted the "kill dot" to a variety of baits.

Because the shad is a silvery shiney baitfish, it has a very strong tendency to change colors at various depths and under a variety of light conditions, so adding the kill dot to any bait color pattern is a pretty safe bet that it might add extra attraction to the bait.

I build and fish mainly for muskies and the muskellunge very often follow and feed on the shad, sometimes as the primary forage for weeks or months at a time. Largemouth and smallmouth bass also feed on shad from time to time if they are available in any given body of water.

The shad schools are nomadic and can be found in both shallow and deep water depending on light conditions, water temperatures, and reproduction cycles.

Other bait fish have similar markings and some have other pronounced marking such as a pronounced lateral line.

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OK, Fatfingers, and thanks.

This dot was a puzzle for me, and now I understand how it came that so many US crankbait makers have adopted it.

Maybe if minnows in the waters I fish would have such a dot, I would have adopted it myself for my crankbaits.

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I just did a couple of King Shad type swimbaits with a medium light gray scale effect back and shoulders over metallic pearl white belly. The paint is thinned Folk Art brand hobby paint (not formulated for airbrush). It has more reflective quality than plain pearl white. Darker gray shad spot, faint red lower gills. I put rubber bands in the joints to hold the segments steady. Segments have sharp edges. If clearcoated with epoxy, it will draw away slightly from a sharp edge, making it thin and easy to wear and chip. I ease the edges on wooden segments to avoid that.

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Hey BobP, do you have any pictures of the baits that you painted. And thanks to everyone else who replied.

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Yeah, as soon as wifey comes home with the camera, I'll post one on the hardbait gallery. ((uploaded at 6:19 EST))

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