B BUG

another top coat question

7 posts in this topic

I have seen many times the question about "tacky" top coats and the response is always the same. I was wondering, since I do mostly foil baits with a top coat between the foil and the first layer of paint , if I were to get a bad mix on this step and the DII did not set up, what woukd happen if I painted over the uncured clear with createx paint and then hit it with another coat of (hopefully mixed correctly}of DII.
Has anyone ever tried this? If so I would love to know the outcome just in case I get a batch that does not set up.
Thanks

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Having done your research here at TU, there is no reason to do a poor job of mixing epoxy. I never screw-up a batch of epoxy, and I'm sure there are many others here who will tell you the same thing. That being said, I would never paint over uncured epoxy.

Here is one foolproof (well nearly so, it depends on the fool) method of mixing epoxy: In a pleasant 72 degree room, invert a can with a concave bottom for your mixing surface. Some use a favorite beverage, I use an areosol can placed upside-down in a jar for stability. Take your time to put the proper amount of resin and hardener in the middle of the can bottom. Using a premade circle of wire (I use 19 gauge stainless, the stuff I make my harnesses from) bent to aproximately the contour of the can bottom, mix thoroughly by whipping the wire back and forth in the can bottom while turning the can around and around. To minimize bubbles, do not lift the wire from the can bottom until you are certain you've mixed it thoroughly. Clean your can and wire with alcohol and you're ready for the next batch.

This method avoids the most frequent causes of incomplete mixing. There are no sides of a cup, crevices in a cup, or mixing sticks or surface where a lethal bit of unmixed epoxy might hide until it is picked up by an application brush so it can ruin your epoxy job. You are literally squeegeeing your single mixing surface with the wire on every stroke, and because the surface is concave the mixture constantly moves back toward the center instead of spreading, say, all over a paper plate This method works equally well for Devcon, E-tex etc.

Bad batches? we don't need no stinking bad batches!

Now get in there and mix nothing but perfect epoxy!
Dean

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Welcome to Devcon University Bug. As you can see Professor McClain is conducting todays class. Professor Tally can answer any of your questions. They are both experts in this field. :wink:
Skeeter

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You can cure an still soft coating of epoxy by coating it with a second coat that has been properly mixed. The lower coat has to be in contact with the new epoxy, so it won't work if there is an intervening layer of acrylic latex.

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[quote name='Dean McClain']Having done your research here at TU, there is no reason to do a poor job of mixing epoxy. I never screw-up a batch of epoxy, and I'm sure there are many others here who will tell you the same thing. That being said, I would never paint over uncured epoxy.

Here is one foolproof (well nearly so, it depends on the fool) method of mixing epoxy: In a pleasant 72 degree room, invert a can with a concave bottom for your mixing surface. Some use a favorite beverage, I use an areosol can placed upside-down in a jar for stability. Take your time to put the proper amount of resin and hardener in the middle of the can bottom. Using a premade circle of wire (I use 19 gauge stainless, the stuff I make my harnesses from) bent to aproximately the contour of the can bottom, mix thoroughly by whipping the wire back and forth in the can bottom while turning the can around and around. To minimize bubbles, do not lift the wire from the can bottom until you are certain you've mixed it thoroughly. Clean your can and wire with alcohol and you're ready for the next batch.

This method avoids the most frequent causes of incomplete mixing. There are no sides of a cup, crevices in a cup, or mixing sticks or surface where a lethal bit of unmixed epoxy might hide until it is picked up by an application brush so it can ruin your epoxy job. You are literally squeegeeing your single mixing surface with the wire on every stroke, and because the surface is concave the mixture constantly moves back toward the center instead of spreading, say, all over a paper plate This method works equally well for Devcon, E-tex etc.

Bad batches? we don't need no stinking bad batches!

Now get in there and mix nothing but perfect epoxy!
Dean[/quote]

Get 'em Cuz !!!:popcorn:

These guys are good.

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Dean,thanks For The Info. On How You Mix Your Topcoat It Sounds Pretty Much Foolproof. As Of This Date I Have Been Able To Dodge Any Topcoat Problems, So I Guess The Reason I Asked Was "just In Case" I Did Get One ,since I Am Stepping Up My Numbers A Bit.
And To Bob P Thanks. This Is Another Reason To Be Sure Of A Good Mix. My Baits Being Weight Sensitive Cant Stand To Many Coats.
Thanks To All.

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