mnflyfisher

Member Submitted Tutorials

12 posts in this topic

I have spent some time looking through the member submitted tutorial section. It looks like most of the pictures along with the tutorials have gone missing - I'm assuming this has something to do with the crash?

Anyway, it would be nice to get more tutorials up / back up along with pictures! The ones that are there are great and I look forward to reading more! :yay:

I would particularly like to see one on some different foiling techniques - how do you burnish the foil? Say you are using a netting/mesh material - do you glue this material to the lure, and then foil over that? or do you glue/tape the foil to the lure and burnish the mesh over the foil to imprint the pattern?

Thanks everyone and keep up the amazing work! 8O

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I cut the foil tape, then put the netting onto that, then stick the foil on the bait and burnish with the rounded end of a Sharpie pen.

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So the netting stays permanently under the foil?

Excuse my stupidity, this is the first time I've really understood this process.

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use 3M spray ahesive and yes the netting stays under the foil permantely for this technique. Use foil tape and apply over the netting, using your finger to "burnished" the foil in the netting. be carefull not to scratch the foil with your nail.

Can't remember who...but someone had a post on this. I will look and post it if I find it.

It was fatfingers original idea but I can not find the post so maybe he will chime in

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The ingredients are:

1. Blank wooden or plastic lure body

2. Netting, the same type you shoot paint over when painting scale effects onto a lure.

3. Foil...there are two types as you probably already know...the aluminum foil we all use in the kitchen and the foil that comes on a roll from a hardware store or Walmart, which is used to tape furnace ductwork together. The furnace type is far superior (again thank you, Husky for introducing me to this stuff). The furnace type comes on a roll. You cut off as much as you need and peel a paper backing from it to expose the glue that is already on the foil. It stretches a bit, which as Husky told me, "you will appreciate that."

4. Spray glue for the netting. You can use almost any type of all-purpose sray adhesive. I bought stuff called Duro All-purpose Spray Adhesive from Walmart, but its not special, just a run of the mill spray glue.

5. Razor knife, razor blade, or Xacto knife. I strongly recommend the use of an Xacto knife because you can cut a precise line when trimming the foil.

(Forgive me if this explanation is too elementary, I struggle writing step-by-step instructions.)

Here's how:

Cut two pieces of netting long enough for the lure blank and wide enough to wrap completely over the top and bottom of the lure. You'll place one piece on each side.

Next lay the netting on a clean piece of paper. I use ordinary printer paper from my computer.

Spray one side of the netting thoroughly with the spray glue.

Apply the netting to lure blank. Be careful to align the pattern on the netting evenly so that the pattern runs along the lure evenly, not tilted sideways, etc. Make sure it sticks properly. If it doesn't peel it back a bit and shoot the netting again with spray glue. Don't worry about getting a bit of the glue on the lure. Won't hurt anything.

Trim the top and bottom of the netting off right down the center line of the back and belly of the lure.

Now apply the netting the same way on the other side of the lure. Trim back and belly down the center line. Try to make it touch at the seams.

Next cut a piece of the foiling and place it over the netting and carefully smooth it down with your thumb. NOTE: Be a bit careful here. The foil scratches easily during this process and even your fingernails will etch it easily, so use a bit of care.

The foil can be slighty stretched but don't be too aggressive because any minor wrinkles burnish away easily when your done.

Again trim away the foil along the center line of the back and belly. Its okay if it overlaps a bit. The seams also almost disappear when burnished.

When your done, take your thumb and push the foil down into the voids in the netting to highlight the scale effect. Take your time, this adds a tremendous amount of detail to the scale effect.

Burnish any crease and all the seams with a smooth rounded object. I use the shaft of a screwdriver. Works fine. I know everyone has their favorite burnishing tool though, so use whatever works for you.

The furnace type foil can be aggressively burnished with no ill effects.

I hope that helps.

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That's perfect fatfingers! Great instructions :yay:

One question though, where do you get your netting? I picked some up in the craft/fabric section at Walmart - looks like it will work just fine.

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You can use a variety of netting.

However, if it is a synthetic, which most of it is, you might consider washing it in your washing machine first to soften it up a bit.

That helps to make it easier to place when foiling and it also helps when your using netting to spray paint scales.

When the netting is stiff it is harder to get it to lay down flat against the bait.

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The way described above is beautiful but there is another option should you want to try it. Foil from a craft or candy supplier can be applied to the bare sealed wood (except if sealing with plastic dip or prop pellets or devcon ) with spray glue then a scale roller from Wasco can be rolled over the foil to get the imprint. Then clear coat before painting. This technique would probably work best on smaller baits.

The reason with the issue of sealant is some is too hard to imprint with a roller. If you use plastic dip 2 coats can still be rolled opposed to 6-7 caots.

Just trying to give another option you'll have to find what you like best or fits your needs.

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Great post, Hoodaddy.

I've found that it is very important to seal the bait after foiling and before painting since the foil does not seem to want to hold paint very well.

Although it can easily be painted it, remains very delicate and subject to flaking off until it is sealed with some type of clearcoat such as envirotec or Devcon 2ton epoxy.

I've recently gone back to envirotec and have found that envirotec is superior (in my experience) for sealing the foiled baits prior to painting and after painting, because the Devcon has more of a tendency to "fog" a bit over the unpainted areas where the foil is allowed to show through.

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Fatfingers,

You struck the nail on the head. I have found that in some cases especially with high humidity Devcon will definitly fog up the foil job. I also 1st coat with etex. I have also had some luck doing some shading on top of the foil with Createx translucent pearls before clearing the 1st time and it gives a neat look. I do a foiled red craw that looks pretty cool like that.

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