fatfingers

Ronco Rotisserie...

14 posts in this topic

Just caught a bit of the infomercial for the Ronco Showtime Rotisserie. It is an oven device that cooks chunks of meat up to 15 pounds! Naturally, I immediately thought, "That would make a great motor for the bait wheel.":lol:

I'm tired of repairing the BBQ motors available at Walmart. Anyone know of a good reasonably price motor? I'm considering the Ronco, but I'd either have to hunt one down at a garage sale or pay the hefty shipping if I buy one on ebay. Then I'd have to strip the motor out of the thing.

Any ideas? Anyone use the Ronco Showtime motor?

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It must be a sheer weight and/or balance deal that kills your Wal-Mart rotisserie motors: I've been using one of them for three years now, and it has a bunch of hours on it on it but it is still going strong. It is very seldom though that I have more than a half pound of evenly-distributed weight on it at one time. I do know that mine never runs hot, and I also use a very lightweight wheel system...and even if I'm turning just one lure, I'll counter-balance it. It does sound as though you need a heavier duty motor for your larger loads, Fatfingers.

Dean

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FF, I found a right angle gear box that is very over kill for my baits. Something like that would be perfect for the big baits you turn. I don't know what one is used for, I was looking for a rotisserie motor and my Dad gave me that. It had some automotive grease/ oil on it so it was probably something for a tractor or something. I can't stop it with my hand it is so strong. It is reverseable, and I just hook a battery charger up to it and it runs great.

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Guys...I just went and got my Ronco out of the storage shed to make a turning wheel.I have a few ideas on how to use it with some rigging like it is after removing the heating element.You guys have any ideas on what I might want to try before I decide to tear it all apart if my 1st idea doesnt work???

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Gaaak! Muskiefool, $190 motor? Must be a nice one.

b1974, I like to mount a motor so it has direct drive to the drying axle. The fewer intermediate gizmos, the less to go wrong.

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I dont know about you guys , but I have 2 or 3 (failed battery) cordless drills around the shed. If you remove the motor from the drill case, there is a plastic planetary gearbox attached to the end - you could run 12V into it (from battery of transformer-battery charger), tape the trigger in until you get the right speed or the gear box can be seperated from motor and connected to another 110 V -12 motor shaft- I think they gear down to about 50 :1 rpm- May need to run 2 gearboxes togeather!!. It's getting more and more complicated-Oh well check them out - if they handle the torque of a drill they should be able to handle a couple of baits. Pete

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The Ronco works GREAT.Just wanted you guys to know.I attached springs to the large disk at both ends,put wire hooks on each end of the springs,attach those hooks to front and rear eye of the crank and tie one wire from the belly eye to the rod.Works like a charm:yay:

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I must have read a hundred posts on rotisserie motors by you guys and I just cannot understand why they are failing. Motors that size, geared down to 4 - 6 rpm should be capable of driving half a dozen wheels.

Is the problem the balance, like Dean said? But a well balanced wheel, even fully loaded with a dozen of fatfingers lures should only require ounces to turn it.

My guess is that the motors are burning out on start up, the initial load to start the wheel turning is killing the motors. They are designed for turning small chunks of meat located on the axis of rotation. You are rotating smaller weights but mounting them 12 inches off centre. It's a force times distance thing.

The solution would be to either drive the rim with a friction wheel, which would mean finding a different geared motor, or assist the motor on power up by hand turning the wheel for a second.

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Vman, it isn't that the motor fails; its the linkage. There is a bar that is inserted and it comes from the factory with a rather sloppy fit. Thus, the bar "slips" a bit every time the wheel rotates. You can balance the wheel with lure placement and other weights, but the problem is only diminished not eliminated.

I've also tried shimming the area where the center axis bar is inserted into the motor (that's where the sloppy fit is located). It is at best a temporary fit.

I've also dismantled the motor and tried to make adjustments to the fit by way of a set screw. Because of the cheap metals used on that particular portion of the linkage between the motor and the center axis bar, it is also only a temporary fix.

It is not really a function of the motor's lack of capacity to handle the weight of the lures, nor does the motor burn up and stop functioning.

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I'm sure you have tried, but what was the result in getting a drill press and drilling through the shaft on the rotisserie and through bolting with a machine screw? I thought that the motors were burning up on you also, that is why I recomended the bigger right angle gear box that is on a tractor PTO.

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Thanks, Longball.

The shaft fits into the motor coupler. (The motor has a coupler which is female). So I tried drilling the female coupler on the motor and threading in a set screw to lock down the shaft and remove the "play" in it as it turns.

Because the coupler is cheap, soft metal, the set screw eventually strips and you're back to square one.

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That makes a difference. Mine has a male leg with a groove in it. I just made a rod to insert over it and put a set screw. When I get my camera back from the repair shop I can take a pic. I can't find one on the web that looks like it.

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