jimmie7915

help with flip flop paint

13 posts in this topic

Hi I was wandering if anybody could help me with the steps I need to take in trying to do a flip flop paint pattern.

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This might not be the level you are on, but start with a base of black. To get your paint to flip flop you will need to spray 3 to 5 coats of it on the black. Too few and it won't flip and too many and it won't flop.

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I don't think that would work.

You could buy flip flop paint or you can make it. Both are a little expensive but a little goes a long ways.

Here is where I learned about Flip Flop paints and the pigments that are used to make it.

http://www.paintwithpearl.com/system.htm

This is the place that I get pigments to make my paints and I use propionate as the binder. This should mix with any clear paint and is fine enough to shoot through any airbrush.

Here is a tip page on a pearls and candies.

http://www.paintwithpearl.com/tips.htm

This is what a lot of guys use on the cars but it looks cool on a bait too.

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You can also find several flip/flop paints in waterbase from Smith paints and WASCO. There are lots of ways to get the effect. Spraying over darker base colors is one, but I use it over light transp. colors also. You just have to play around to find your desired results.

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so basically u can't reproduce flip - flop effect using normal paint combinations? ..let's say acrilic paint (rattle cans)

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Flip flop paint contains a special pigment that is shaped like a pyramid. On one face of the pigment structure is Color A on the side adjacent to Color A is Color B. When the pigment is mixed as a paint and applied to an object it appears as Color A, when the object is tilted or moved the color changes because you are viewing a different facet of the pyramid. If it sprayed on a round or curved object, little to no movement is needed to complete the color shift. To utilize this type of pigment it is usually applied over a dark basecoat, I enjoy using it applied over a white basecoat as it makes for an excellent scale pattern that is not very noticiable until the bait is moved

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