bamabass

Tried DNLC Need Help

9 posts in this topic

Well today i got my topcoat and tried it.i decided to dip it and it worked pretty well.the only problem is is that it got a few uneven spots on it and i dont know wat to do.Also will this topcoat ever effect the paint under it and make it" crack" like some others do? will lightly sanding uneven spots make it smooth?

thanks

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i did it by hand and it dried pretty quickly but i think alot of it happened when i hung it. is rotating by hand ok ?

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i dunno if rotatign by hand is ok or not, since it dries quickly, and it's dipped, so it's thicker, you;ll need to be exta careful with it.

Try a run brushing it on, see if you get better results

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well when i dip it i let it run onto a paper towel until there arent many drips then i rotate it while in front of a small heater for about 10 min.i will try the brush next time.i think sanding will fix itt his time though.it is a great product though,very glosy and somewhat easy to work with.just got to get it on right.about how long do you let it sit before you handle it?

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The heater mght be a problem, I dunno. It's a moisture cured poly, and I don't claim to understand that, but heat kind of sucks moisture up, might be counterproductve.

After I dip it, I spin it until I think about it again, then set it on a shelf overnight, get it the next day or so after work, so I personally let them sit for 20 hours or so. The stuff continues to cure for the next 30 days, and i've noticed that if I bang stuff off rocks the first time out, only a few days after coating, it's more fragile, but the longer it sits, the better off it is.

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I wouldn't rotate it in front of a heater, there is no point in doing that, it will help nothing and could cause bubbles. The solvent doesn't last long, it is probably gone in about 15 minutes or so; after that it is humidity curing. I usually use 3 coats on my crankbaits, doing one a day. I brush mine on, as you've probably read somewhere; it brushes on very quickly and I find it easier to control the amount I'm applying to the lure.

If your paint hasn't cracked through the solvent stage, I don't know why it ever would after it has flashed.

This stuff is pretty simple to get the hang of, after a few baits you should be an expert. All the stuff dampeoples said about curing etc. was also right on the money.

Dean

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Just read the crack thing, I've experienced this twice, and I sat around for days on end trying to figure out what I did, and it turns out that that I went really, really thick on the paint on these lures, so that might be something for you to look into. I had let the lures dry inside on a rack for a few days, too lazy to clear them, I guess, so I'm not thinking it's the moisture, but still have not ruled it out, as the thicker the paint, the harder it would be for the moisture in the lower coats to dry.

Give Dean's method a try, see if that works better for you, the coating is excellent, high gloss, super strong and thinner than epoxy, might take a bait or two to get the hang of it, but before long you'll be on track.

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