bassmaster1974

Sencils and scales

20 posts in this topic

I have been using assorted netting for scales.I like the effect,but it is hard to get any kind of precision while painting with a net stretched around the bait.I have found a few sites that sell mesh "scale" masking and I was wondering if any of you guys have used it or have any advice on something else that I can adhere to the bait without having to wrap it in a net.Also wondering how you make a stencil for craw patterns?I have made a few using shaped edges of paper/cardboard,but most of the ones I see look like they were applied with a stencil.Any advice is much appreciated.

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we use very thin lexan for templates to shoot thru.. the templates last for years with a little clean up occasionally

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At the hobby shopes or WalMart crafts section, you can get blank stencils. A tough plastic that works well.

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I guess what I am having trouble with is getting the stiffer plastic materials to contour on the sides of the bait.I spray a gill pattern with a thin metal sheet and I dont really have to contour that much but I do get overspray sometimes.I saw a web site once a few years ago that showed how to make a stencil out of some thin metal.They wrapped a bait,contoured it to the bait and cut down the middle of the back.Then they had 2 shells that fit the same kind of crank perfect.Lay one side,spray and then the other.

So you are just cutting out a stencil from the blank sheets at walmart and holding it up to the side and spraying?

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bassmaster1974 vbmenu_register("postmenu_63778", true);

So you are just cutting out a stencil from the blank sheets at walmart and holding it up to the side and spraying?

That works well for me. Wear a disposable glove on your stencil holding hand. Or you can use hemostats as a lure holder and use small spring clamps to hold your stencil next to your lure. Naturally the further your stencil is from your lure, the softer the edges of your pattern will be and vice-versa. I prefer a slightly softer edge for most of my patterns than holding the stencil flush against the lure will give. I've used these plastic stencils for years with Createx and Parma paints--just wipe them with a damp rag or paper towell after spraying to restore their transparency & and /or to flip over for the next spraying.

Dean

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I have just got into stenciling, saves heaps of time and beats the old "shaky hand" look. I picked up on someones suggestion of using old Blister pack plastic sheet, works well. I think you can buy hot stencil irons there, but I have a small soldering iron, so just wrapped a piece of thin wire around it (spring or stainless wire is best) and turned it on and stenciled away. Want a wider line pattern- use thicker wire!! Because they are hand "cut" , you get a more realistic pattern without sharp difined edges. After burning your patern you may have to sand it on a flat plate to knock off the beads of plastic around the edges , works well so far. Pete

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you can also buy a hair comb . heat the tines on the comb to bend. spray thru for a fire tiger pattern. works great.. use your imagination. you will be surprised at the results. thats whats so neat about this site. ideas and energy is boundless.

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One more, I use a water filter wrench and attach the stencil or netting to. Attach it with glue or tape, don't make it real tight.

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an embroidery hoop makes a good mesh/scale netting holder ($1 at the craft store). You can get these in almost any size and usually round and oval shapes are available. I use a pair of clamps to hold the hoop steady and hold the bait right up to the mesh, spray, flip, spray, done.

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take your bait and cover it with vasoline, then cut thin strips of paper. dip them in wallpaper paste. lay them on the bait till you get the desired pattern. let dry fliover and do the other side. has worked for me very well. after it gets a little paint on it. it gets very durable

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As for cutting/burning your own stencils you can purchase Frisket material at Michaels Crafts. Frisket is a thin tough clear plastic sheeting that has a tacky side on it (make sure your paint is set ). To even further reduce the tackiness rub it across your pant leg a couple of times. It is very flexible and works for us in a lot of applications.

As for scales simple netting on a embroidery hoop works but I have seen posted on here of a homemade box with the netting loosely streched loosely over the top that seems to give you almost an extra hand ??? (poor expl.) Not sure who posted it. I believe FF or Husky also apply netting to thier baits and foil over them and burnish, giving the optimum scale effect. :yay:

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apb posted the open-ended box--3 sides rigid, with the 4th side made of scale netting loose enough to wrap the corners of the lure when inserted and lifted against the netting, while he sprays it with the other hand--brilliant inside the box thinking. When he took about 2 seconds to demonstrate its use to me this, I realized that it was the singlemost efficient lure painting accessory I'd ever seen.

Dean

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I don't know if this is what Hoodaddy was refering to, but this is the jig I use.

Here is a jig I made and had good success with. I don't have a pic of the gill template, but you should be able to get an idea as to how it works. The mesh is replaced with a piece of plastic from a paper binder sleve. The gills or whatever else you want to paint is cut into the plastic. The plastic has a little slack, so when the top of the jig is down, the plastic wraps around the bait just enough to create a seal. Mark the location of each bait, keep it in the same spot for each bait of the same type and paint.The plastic cleans up well and can be used over and over. The bait is attached to a dowl and nail holder and slides into a hole in the side of the jig allowing two hands free for painting.

Attached Imagesjpg.gifpics 001.jpg (65.1 KB, 75 views)jpg.gifpics 002.jpg (80.0 KB, 63 views)

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Yes, The box I was refering to was the one posted by APB a while back...Thanks Cuz. Could'nt remember who posted it....Part timers disease you know !!!

Joe, your box is on the same line as APB's and works very well. :yay:

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Yes, The box I was refering to was the one posted by APB a while back...Thanks Cuz. Could'nt remember who posted it....Part timers disease you know !!!

No problem cuz...I know sometimes we have to pool our resouces to come up with one complete thought.:yay:

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Another thing i've heard that some do (although I haven't tried it myself) is using heatshrink tubing, forming it to your bait, drawing the design, then split the tubing down the middle making a clamshell. You then cut out the design to create a custom molded stencil. I think it was Hughsey or Skeeter who came up with this, it might be in the archives or old TM site...

Clemmy

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