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testors paint

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#1 willie525



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Posted 23 July 2007 - 08:00 PM

i was wondering if it is ok to put testors model paint though an airbrush, if so how much thinner per part do i need to use.


#2 Hoodaddy



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Posted 23 July 2007 - 09:26 PM


I have never used Testors "model" paint but have used enamels and some require light thinning. I'm sure there are others on here that have tried them or something similar.

I use acrylic latexs and some laquers at times......cant stand the smell and dam sight more of a hassel to cleanup.

#3 fatfingers


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Posted 23 July 2007 - 11:26 PM

I've used Testers quite a bit. It goes through an airbrush very nicely.

You might consider thinning with medium automotive reducer. It can be purchased at a store that sells automotive paints. The reducer does a much better job of thinning it than either lacquer thinner or paint thinner. (Lacquer thinner is what you should use for cleaning the airbrush and flushing the airbrush between colors when using enamels).

I use two parts of paint to one part of reducer. I just shake the bottle a bit and pour the entire contents of the paint into an empty 35mm film cannister. Then fill the empty paint bottle about 1/2 full with automotive reducer and shake the bottle again to get the remaining paint in the bottle added to the reducer and pour that 1/2 full bottle into the film cannister on top of the paint. Shake the film cannister containing the paint and the reducer to thoroughly mix it together and your ready to paint.

The film cannister, which is plastic and comes with an airtight lid, will keep your paint fresh for several weeks. You can use the film cannisters for acrylics also and it will keep acrylics for quite a while tool

Enamels have some advantages over acrylics. It dries a bit faster and has less of a tendency toward running if you get a little aggressive with how fast you coat the bait. It also allows you to work a bit faster. Enamels also have colors that are different than acrylics.

I have even used both together on the same bait, but I'm careful to clear with SG-100 automotive clear to put a layer of protection between the enamels and the acrylics. You could also use enamels then apply a coat of envirotex and then finish the bait with whatever acrylic colors you favor. The SG-100 automotive clear is also available at a store that sells automotive paints.

Using both enamels and acrylics allows you a very wide range of color choices.

The disadvantage of enamels is the flammability and the fumes, especially the reduce and the lacquer thinner. Be careful and use plenty of ventilation. Spraying outside with a gentle breeze can work nicely if you have no paint booth.

I always wear vinyl gloves when handling the stuff to avoid skin contact and to make the clean up a lot easier when I'm done.

With any type of paint, enamel or acrylic, always take your time and thoroughly clean that airbrush when your done.

#4 willie525



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Posted 24 July 2007 - 07:35 AM

i got them in a kit when ever i made models but i do think they are enamles.thanks.