pikeman

Cutting shapes tools - ???

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:cry::cry::cry: ok, tired of improving my fingers muscles using knifes, cutters and all sorts of blades, the question is: what kind of tools do you use for cutting shapes? ... for sanding and details I use a dremel but for the rest ... :cry:

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I use a scroll saw because that's what I had handy but I think a small band saw would be faster, easier to use, and roughly the same cost. If you rarely do anything but balsa, either is fine. For hardwood, a scroll saw is pretty slow.

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at least some easy to use tools used by carpenters cause I don't know what am I searching for :), I went to the shop and saw a bunch of tools with strange shapes :lol: since I don't know what they are for , I can't buy them:nuhuh:

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I cut out my pattern with a scroll saw and carve with a SHARP pocket knife that I filed down to a 10* angle rather than the 20* that most come with.I sand and shape with assorted sanding blocks.

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Wel, if you go to a home center, I think a 10" band saw would be what I'd pick. They can be sat on a work bench top and start at around $100. The band saw has a continuous thin saw blade that runs around two large wheels. The blade has teeth that cut downward and it clears all the sawdust from the cut as it works. A scroll saw also sits on a bench top and has a much smaller, thinner blade with fine teeth. The blade is clamped between 2 arms that vibrate rapidly up and down. It also cuts on the downstroke, but its fine teeth cut much more slowly. Either will do the job, the band saw will just do it easier and faster on hardwoods. It can be pretty tedious to cut 1" thick hardwood on a scroll saw.

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Pikeman - Once you get past the bandsaw bit- there is a whole new world of tools, most of which you will have to make yourself. I have included a picture of just some of them- This is just to shape lures - then you get into painting and finishing- this is another world, which I am still trying to master. ALL this is not to scare you, just trying to let you know what you are getting into - hope you have an understanding wife and plenty of time. Pete

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For now I have an understanding girlfriend, I'm building lures for a year now, so I know "what I was getting into" the only problem is that I don't have a place to make noise, dust, color the floor and so on ... THX for the advice , I have a huge box full of materials and tools :)) and it seems I'll have to change it :))

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I have a scrall saw and a disc/belt sanding tool. I keep them both at my father's house. The scrall saw stays in the garage, while the sanding machine stays in the house. That's because there is no room enough for both in the garage. So I cut out shapes with the scrall saw (very difficult to follow shapes when working in basswood), then put it aside, bring the sander from the house, install it in the garage, and when finished, clean it, and put it again in its box in the house. Then in my flat I would do the rest for the crankbaits to be finished. Problems there as well with the mess I do and a wife which likes a very clean flat.

So I think that the first tool a crankbait maker should think of, would be a house on the ground:lol:

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