Bester

Band saw reccomendations

18 posts in this topic

What brand/size of band saw do you guys use? I'm looking to spend 100-125 bucks. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm just using the $99 Delta band saw from Lowes. I am only cutting balsa, basswood and pine or maple once in a while. No problem so far.

Eric

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would save your money and go with the 14 inch saw. I had a small band saw and it's a toy compared to this one. The one I have is made by Ridgid but the Deltas are very nice.

RM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

go with Ridget tools, i do remodeling work and have Ridgid tools and have had no problem with any of them.

jr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Rigid 14" bandsaw is awesome. It received the "Consumer's Guide" best buy award. You can't go wrong with this tool

Rod

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scroll vs Band - scrollsaws are best at cutting intricate shapes on thin sheets of wood. The blade has a thin kerf, smaller teeth, and is narrower front to back than a bandsaw. It vibrates rapidly up/down, cutting only on the downstroke. A scrollsaw will get the job done, but it is slower than a bandsaw when cutting thicker wood. While scrollsaws CAN cut wood up to 2" thick, it is quite tedious to cut 1" thick hardwood on one. The bandsaw has a continuous cut and the saw teeth are larger, so it cuts much faster. JMHO, soft balsa cuts so easily that either does a good fast job on it. Hardwood is a different story, and where the bandsaw comes out on top.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick question: anyone reccomend blade sizes regaardless of brand? smaller is great for curves, but I imagine bigger is better for maintaining straight lines on/for lips....

Any opinoins on whats needed/ideal?

Please include your saw model to further educate us on application and keep on topic.

Clemmy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First, I think no one could better explain the difference for us, crankbait nuts, between scroll saw and band saw, than BobP did.

I have a question, though.

I use a scoll saw for almost a year now. Not very happy with it. I cut 14 mm thick basswood with it, and find very difficult to follow the cutting line. I have to be very pacient when working. Maybe I'll have to find a way to get more tension on the blade. I can cut out 6-7 crank shapes in an hour.

My question is for those having a long experience with a band saw.

Up to now, I broke many blades when working with the scroll saw, but nothing dangerous happened.

Does anyone know what happens if a band saw blade breaks while working? (poor quality of the blade, malfunction of the machine, human error - the reason doesn't matter)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

breaking a blade theres vey little chance of being cut. the blade is incompassed within the guards. i go thru several blades a year occasionally breaking one or 2. over 20 years and never an injury. do remember to use safety glasses with all power tools. stuff in the eyes is no fun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For cutting like you are talking about for small project for bait or penturning and other craft items. Most any 8 or 10 inch bandsaw will do a excellant job. The 14 inch delta nd ridged are excellant machine but the use comes into effect for cutting very thick stock and doing resawing. The narrower the blade the tighter the curve you can make the wider blades with a skip tooth pattern will saw best for strieght line cutting. Most 8 and 10 in band saws will take up to a 1/2 inch blade. When you get into the 14 inch and larger saws you can got up to a 3/4 inch and sometimes on larger saws a 1 !/2 inch blade. The best applications for a scroll saw is in doing fine fret work that is sl0w and pains taking. they cut very slow and it is very hard to hold a strieght line because of the narrow blade. As far as safty goes both are the safest machines in a shop and one must work hard to do any damage other than a nick. The only time one really is in danger on a band saw is in changing the blades wihout disconectiong the power, not just turning it off unplug it. introduce your work to it do not force the work into the blade. The art in a bandsaw is the fine tuning of ihe guide blocks and blade alignment. Let me know if i can be of any help in this to you

John auctionsx@aol,com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not super cautious about tool safety but always wear a pair of polycarbonate shooting glasses when scroll sawing hardwood. Like most, I've broken my share of blades. They usually doesn't fly out of the saw... but who knows where a piece might fly? The thicker blades with coarse teeth cut straight lines easier, the thin blades with lots of teeth (20 tpi) do curves easier. I use the thick blades more often since they also cut a nice lip slot that's just the right thickness for my circuit board lips. I crank the tension on my blade down pretty tight, using pliers if necessary. As far as sticking to a fine line, I think it just requires a little patience and experience. Let the tool do the work and don't get in a hurry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bob p.

excellent advice PATIENCEwhen cutting. forcing a cut makes scrap material.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now