GVF

Cracking paint

43 posts in this topic

I have used just about every top coat on the market and for my taste I like devcon. Mainly because it is tough and I build Musky baits also. I do build baits for lake trout out of Cedar, seal them with Swede's concoction, prime, paint and 3 coats of Devcon and fish them at 80 to 100 feet and have never had one fail. And yes I do make sure all the sharp edges are rounded and that extra care goes to lip, line tie and hook hanger attachment and sealing. I have built hundreds of baits using this method, so I do know a little about devcon and sealing baits......

Rod

Rod, my comments, such as the one about the sharp edges, weren't directed as a criticsm toward your bait building abilities, but to the problem that was posed. We all knew he was having a water penetration problem that was magnified by the extreme pressure, but we were all seaching for possible causes. His lure has sharp edges, and had he merely switched to Devcon, he would have encountered a new set of problems, while perhaps not fixing the original cause. None of us could know if his brand of clearcoat was not waterproof, but it seems more likely that he had an application problem, because I can't imagine a fishing lure topcoat being marketed that wasn't waterproof. I know you or I wouldn't have an application problem, because we are experienced builders and we could use Brand X clear lacquer and make the lure waterproof, no biggie. No way was I implying anything negative about your luremaking skills!! Your lures were not the problem! I just wanted to check his spark plugs, before we overhauled the engine.

Yours, Dean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been using spray paint for the primers and finishes some are model paints some are multi use. Early on I was dipping them in vinyl paint .As for sealing I haven't done anything(big mistake right?)The top coat is a seal coat by component systems a one part clear. The eye hook for the line is installed and left in place to hang the lure while painting I make the hole for the hook eye before painting and install after finish.I dip the threads in gorilla glue before installation. Most of the lures are basswood allthough some are redwood ,ceader, pine. The one in the pic is basswood.

OK, we should start from the ground up. (A lot of trial and error but this should cut that in half.)

The guys on here should be able to fill in anything I miss.

This is for a bait made with a single piece of wood and screw in hardware.

1)Design and carve the bait. Sand smooth. Your wood should be kiln dried.

2)Weight it and install hardware. Fill the weight holes. (Gorilla glue is waterproof but it has to have a drop of water and be under pressure to for it to work right. Try 5 Min. Devcon for the eyelets.)

3)Seal your bait. Some of the guys use Devcon or other sealers and it seems to work great. I like Propionate Sealer and have never had a problem. With Propionate you just soak it, sand it and dip it a few more times to seal it.

4)Sand it lightly, prime and paint it with compatible paints.

5)Topcoat. Devcon. Etex, Dick Nite, Propionate, Etc. Follow the instructions of others and make sure all the paint is off the hardware prior to applying your topcoat.

6)Lower it to 200 feet and let us know how it does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not that I would ever hope to fish at a depth of 100' or 200', but I would like to know how is that done with a crankbait. Don't tell me it is a floating one. And how much time does the lure need to reach such a depth? Do you still have time to fish it? And what if such a crankbait would be made out of lead? Would it solve cracking paint problems?:?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are using the Seal Coat, be careful what type of paint you're using it with. I can't find the pictures anymore, but painted a bait with a mix of Createx, Polytranspar and Wildlife Colors, and it cracked shortly after the clear was applied (with a brush). I contacted CSI, who asked me to send the bait in for inspection after a phone call. The guy told me over the phone that no paint should interact like that with the coating. After they inspected it at CSI, I got a message on the phone telling me that they only recommend using their paint, and they don't really know what happened to the bait at all. I made a post about it, with pictures, my findings and CSI's findings, but I think it was lost late last year with the server problems.

I would recommend using another type of clear, I've only personally used D2T, Dick Nite, and Seal Coat. I would not use the D2T because it cracks, and pulls away from edges. Good thing is that for the price of shipping, the good folks at DN will send you a 2oz. bottle to try for yourself. There might be other, thin, clears to try, I do not have any experience with them at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GVF, it seems everyone missed an important question that you tabled, namely, can you resque the thirty lures that you have already made, without sanding down.

My inexperienced opinion would be yes. It has to be worth a try. I would wipe the lures down with a suitable solvent to remove any grease and other contaminants before applying a coat of epoxy.

However, you might want to heed Deans comments on sharp edges on one or two of the lures as a test, this will mean some touching up the paint job. This sharp corners issue has been discussed many times on this site and must be considered very important.

I hope you post your results back here, success or failure. As I and I suspect quite a few others are learning a lot from this excellent thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rofish,

They get the baits too that depth with the use of a downrigger.Essentially it's a 8-10lb lead ball with the lure clipped too it.When the fish strikes the lure is released from the down rigger..Nathan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Vodkaman I was afraid I would be sanding down all those lures. The large ones I have are not too hard to sand down they are large enough to hold on to but the little ones:drool: WATCH the fingers!!

I have been re coating the ones I have ready for Pyramid and will be coating them with at least 10 coats to be sure they will not "leak" The fest is only a month away.They will be fished in 40' depths. I am taking extra care to coat the sharp edges and inverting them to dry, the sharp edge down.

they forgot to tell him to warm it at 400 degrees F for 2 hours, for a complete cure,

OK I need more info on this You're saying that I need to heat cure my lures? 2 hrs at 400 I would be afraid to burn them and what a suprise when my wife looks in the oven:lol:

After pyramid I will re evaluate the lures and sand down ,seal and re-paint.

Nathan thanks for filling in Rofish on the downrigger thing for me.

Good thing is that for the price of shipping, the good folks at DN will send you a 2oz. bottle to try for yourself.

dampeoples I couldnt find how to get the free samples from the DN site do you have a link?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nathan,

Do you know what? I am stupid enough to confuse feet with yards. When I talked about feet, I had yards in mind.

But I didn't know the trick you are talking about. Cannot figure out how it works, but I got the ideea. So thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ro fish we fish lakes here that exceed 300' and to find the big ones you have to get it down so we use a downrigger which is a motorized cable with a large wt 8-12 lbs and we use a line release to clip the line attached to the lure and pole when a fish hits the line is released and you fight the fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're saying that I need to heat cure my lures?

Absolutely not! I was speaking of a hypothetical situation only! Do not burn lures for wifey!

Dean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You're saying that I need to heat cure my lures?

Absolutely not! I was speaking of a hypothetical situation only! Do not burn lures for wifey!

Dean

Actually, the Seal-Coat folks recommend that, that's what I thought you were referring to!

Here is the DN link. It's the same link that is displayed on the banner images when theirs comes up. Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, the Seal-Coat folks recommend that, that's what I thought you were referring to!

Sterling, I had no idea, really--was it really 2 hours at 400 degrees???? Then they should offer instructions to that effect, I mean if they don't already. I didn't mean to give bogus hypothetical mis-imformation, that was right on the money. I must get away...soon...

tight lines,

Dean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ha ha, oven cure for 12 hours, I wouldn't have had the nerve to tell anyone that about my product...of course that was for the hard cure...as opposed to the soft cure I guess

:D

Dean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I got my shipment of Devcon 2 ton today and I gave a light sand to the finish and applied a coat of D2T. I only did a few of them and I like the results. I rotated them end for end after a few minuets so the resin wouldn't run and the finish looks good.I will sand them again and give them another coat and let them cure and send them deep and then we'll see if I'll have to throw them out and start over.

My first lures I painted about 3 years ago and have been asking and looking for answers to why my paint would not hold up.It took one question and you guys a couple days to resolve my dilemma this site rocks.

All the people I talked with had lots of knowledge about pressure and depth explained to me the problems I would encounter and all were related to crush pressure and not on water infiltration. This is why I didnt think about it but now I am armed with information and that is priceless.I will make a new batch of "little torpedoes" and do them the right way and post the results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GVF, I wouldn't get carried away putting too many coats on. Maybe two and then try them out. It really depends how convenient the water is for a quick trial. I have read of a few members using two coats, I cannot remember anyone applying three top coats of D2T. If I am wrong, someone will pipe in.

I am very fortunate in that my prototype testing facility is the swimming pool down stairs. Not much use for testing bathyspheres though!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now