jim45498

Deep clearcoat

8 posts in this topic

I have seen some clearcoats that look like I could put my finger an inch deep in them. Beautiful deep finish.

How in the world did they do that? It was not devon epoxy.

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Actually it probably was Devcon 2ton :oooh: You will see some great builders on here who put multiple layers of epoxy to get a deep finish look even layering in paint and stencils between the layers to achieve a 3d effect. :twocents:

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It could very well have been Devcon, and it also could have been a single coat. It could have been Envirotex Lite, although it was probably multiple coats as E-tex tends to apply thinner than Devcon. It also could have been multiple coats of a moisture-cure urethane coating such as Dicknite's topcoat which goes on thin, but can be built up through additional coats; It also could have been a urethane on top of an epoxy. I like clearcoating foils with a coat of E-tex over the foil because of its thickness, followed by coats of Dicknite's because of its clarity, no-bubble application and its abrasion resistance, which really particularly protects the epoxy where it thins-out or pulls away from edges...plus dicknite's doesn't crack: it has been my experience that Devcon when applied in multiple coats, has a greater tendency for cracks, than when applied in a single coat...perhaps because it loses any flexibility? Not sure, but if you use multiple Devcon coats, do not drop your lure on a hard surface, and don't expose it to temperature extremes.

Just my 2 cents worth, but from back when 2 cents would buy you 2 big pieces of Double Bubble.

Dean

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Dean,

How are you applying the D.N. clear?? I have a quart of the stuff that I have used for spinnerbait blades but have not tried it on many hardbaits

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I brush it on. Some guys dip it, Longball (Doug) does, for one, plus some others, but I like brushing it on, for contolling the amount, and keeping it off the lip. It can also be sprayed by cutting it with acetone, lacquer thinner, etc. I start at the nose and work to the tail very quickly. If I miss a spot, I dab it with a wet brush. What you can't do is go back over it and work it and re-work it like epoxy, you'll only make a mess because it flashes so quickly. Naturally, as a moisture, or humidity cure, damp weather is fine for application, as opposed to epoxy. I do a coat every 24 hours, but you probably have experience with all that from the blades. Don't hesitate to p.m. me with any questions. You can also email Dick with any questions, particularly concerning diluting and spraying, keeping it fresh, etc., and he's always quick to respond.

Dean

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Another way that this is done is with the paint itself. If you use translucent paints then the effect can be accomplished with multiple coats of really thinned out paint. But to really do it right is a patience game. You have to spray a color and let it dry before you put on the next coat. If you don't have the patience to do this it will not turn out properly. You can shoot a second coat when the first coat is tacky. But if you build too much too quickly, then the paint will crack before it cures. You have to thin your paint so much that it may take 10 to 20 coats (depending on the color) before you reach the desired depth of color. Alot of the Japanese are achieving this because they are shooting on a clear plastic bait. The clear plastic really helps in achieving this effect. As far as a clear, you will need to spray about 3 coats of Dick Nite's stuff to get a good thickness or just one coat of Devcon. That is how it is done.

Skeeter

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