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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/08/2021 in all areas

  1. Do you check the temp? I'd really suggest that you check the temp and get it up to 350 and stop. Sounds like you're overheating by just looking at the plastic.
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  2. Correct, the reason being; Injecting polycarbonate or any other material as used in the technique for smaller baits does not work for larger baits. The material thickness required to get the buoyancy right, will result in sink holes and an extended material cooling time. So, for large baits, dense foams are the way to go. Dave
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  3. You're welcome. There are also resins and (compressed) foams. You can achieve almost any type of buoyancy with those. Some of the large bass swimbaits are made of those. They seem to be used in smaller production runs. Plastic is easier to use in mass production. You can also go with one type of plastic for the diving lip like polycarbonate and ABS for the body. The lip is stamped or cut and the body is molded separately. The lip is glued into the body like a Grandma type musky bait.
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  4. Mass production lure companies use a variety of plastics. The common types are acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polycarbonate, and polypropylene. The different types can also be blended. Each company has their own formulas. The precise formulas are trade secrets. A Berkley square bill may use a different formula from a Bomber square bill even if they are same general type of plastic. A company may use a different formula or different type of plastic for each product line. A Bomber square bill may use a different type of plastic from a Saltwater Magnum Long A. Companies choose a plastic for a certain density, weight, durability and cost based on what they want the lure to do. The density of each type of plastic changes some based on the particular formula. ABS is somewhere around 1.06 g/cm^3. Polycarbonate is around 1.20 g/cm^3. Polypropylene is around 0.92 g/cm^3. If I had to guess, the most common type of plastic used in a typical bass size lure is some type of ABS. ABS is in the mid-range in terms of density of the 3. It can provide a wide variety of buoyancy based on the thickness, the size of the hollow chamber and internal weighting. ABS is typically cheaper than polycarbonate. It is strong and durable enough for a typical bass size lure. Some of the larger saltwater lures are made of polycarbonate because it is more durable and impact resistant. Big saltwater lipped lures are usually made of some type of polycarbonate or they wouldn’t survive. Polypropylene is used in some saltwater lures like big top waters and big lipless trolling lures. These rely on a wire harness with heavy hardware for strength and need more buoyancy.
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  5. What about the Mepps Agila? They are stacked. I've gotten double blades to work really well on some cheap french blades but that is the only blade I've gotten it to work on.
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  6. More weight directly in the head. You’ll want it to be more jig like. Than even sitting in the water with weight in the belly. You want the line pulling from the line directly at the head as if it were a jig hook. Try it out I bet you’ll be surprised.
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  7. I agree with Dave's suggestion about using a double hinge and I would also add some more weight to the front section of the body as low as possible to add more stability. Either that or know you need to work it very slow and methodical. Big fish don't like to chase if they don't have to.
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  8. Good advice Dave I think I mentioned in this thread or some other about using a system wear I used different lexan tails. I did that with my old paddle tail lures. Nothing fancy just two small eye screws is how I secured them for testing
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