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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/12/2022 in all areas

  1. Outlaw4 You reminded me that I never got around to trying hydro-dipping baits using oil-based spray paints in a bucket of water last winter. It looks like I should be able to get some interesting patterns without a lot of effort.
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  2. Base coat I use zinzeer primer, I've used it for yrs but it seem that it didn't age well.the rest was createx paint
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  3. Looks like I am getting a bunch of schooling if the brush don't work. Keep it coming folks. Arne.
    1 point
  4. dip (thinned paints) for basecoats. still should do this way anyway maybe hand paint everything else. most efficient use of paint. can paint to any level of detail required
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  5. A combination of rattlecans, hand painting, and Sharpies. You can accomplish quite a bit with those and stencils, netting, 1/8" to 1/2" masking tape. I still use rattle cans for primer and base layers especially on large baits. For some small details and touch ups, I have done a quick rattle can spray into a plastic cup to make a little pool of spray paint. Then, I use a small paint brush from Walmart to hand paint with the paint from a spray can. (30 for $2 in the crafts section). This can come in handy when you get a blemish from removing tape, a bug landing on wet spray paint, or if you drop a bait mid paint job and only get a couple of paint chips. Sometimes a screw up is savable with out starting over.
    1 point
  6. Rattle can primer, hand paint lures with water-borne paints, top coat with clear nail polish
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  7. Well, havn't touched the airbrush since spring when I started fishing. Only started with the airbrushing late winter last year. When I pick it up again shortly might be able to tell you. Hope I can make the thing work again. LOL, Arne.
    1 point
  8. thanks for mentioning me! I own Fishheadcustomlures.com, I recently took over for Dinger Baits. Website launched back in August. I am slowly building up inventory. It is a process, but I will eventually have all the same high quality products that Dinger offered in the past. I am doing my best to fill Brian's shoes in terms of customer service. I understand the importance of good communication and timely shipping. I try to respond to messages same day and am I getting orders out in 1-2 days Next week I will have restocks of the Popper, Point5 dd crankbait, and new stock of the S crank ko with holographic foil and 4 and 5 mm split rings. Tracking says these will arrive Monday and hopefully can get them on the site that same day I also have lil john medium divers, 1.5 one knock squarebills in clear and holographic, 1.5 silent squarebills, and P78 medium divers all on order. I will be ordering more stock next week, not sure what that will be yet. Probably restock of other popular items that recently sold out. Most orders are taking 4-6 weeks to ship from the suppliers. The duo style baits (d100 and d120) will be a while as that supplier has a large minimum quantity I am not able to meet yet, but those blanks are high on my priority list Eric
    1 point
  9. I have ordered from Predator Baits a few times and like their quality. I have also had good luck with Dinger, Cedar Run and Shelt's. In case you did not see it, there is a pinned post at the top of the Hard Baits forum with a good list of blank lure suppliers. They each have a different selection of blanks. If you test blanks before you paint them, you should seal the line tie and hook hangers with a bit of superglue. Sometimes there are tiny holes that can let water in.
    1 point
  10. At Rowhunter's suggestion, I'm starting a PVC thread. I use it for all my lure building, for the following reasons: It is totally waterproof, so I can shape a lure, and then test float and ballast it without any sealing. I have a 3 gallon bucket of water in my driveway that I use for test floating. It is buoyant. The Azek PVC decking is as buoyant as poplar, a hardwood I used to build my jointed swimbaits from. The Azek trimboard is even more buoyant, like medium density balsa. I can make really active shallow cranks with it. It is strong. The decking is as strong as any wood, for lure building, and the trimboard, although not as dense, is still plenty strong enough for any crank. And I use it for my smaller two piece jointed lures, too. I caught a 7lb largemouth with a PVC trimboard spybait I made that was 4" long, but only 7/16" thick, and I had drilled several 3/16" holes up from the belly for my ballast. She ate the rear hook, and the bait held up fine. Both are strong enough to hold screw eyes with just a small pilot hole. No need for any reinforcement, or setting into holes filled with epoxy. I usually use the gap filling/brush on super glue alone to set my hardware, and a lot times my bills, too. I use the accelerant (thank you Ben) dripped onto the glue to help it set quickly, once things are positioned. It machines and carves well. Although the sanding dust is nasty, because it sticks to everything, including my sinuses, PVC is easily machined and shaped with the same tools I used for wood. As with any work, sharp tools work best. I cut out my bait profile, and lip slot, with a bandsaw, and try to drill any ballast hole while the bait has the flat sides, so I can drill straight holes with my drill press. I use an oscillating belt sander with an 80 grit belt to do my major shaping, working from a centerline I put on the bait after I've sanded the bandsaw marks off. I "carve" details with a dremel sanding drum, and drill out my eyes with a multi-spur bit on a drill press. I typically sand down from 80 grit to 120 grit with a vibrator sander, and finish up with a small piece of sandpaper to get edges and details softened. Because it has no direction-oriented grain, it carves really well with sharp tool. It can be laminated into bigger lure blanks using the same PVC glue plumbers use for PVC pipe, or you can use super glue. If you use both the PVC primer and the glue, the two pieces actually melt into one solid piece. As long as the two surfaces are flat and mate, you're good to go. It paints well. I can shoot Wicked White as a base coat onto a raw PVC bait, heat set it, and never have any separation problems with my paint schemes. When I've had occasion to remove some paint to modify a bait, I've had to sand down to the PVC to get the paint off. It never peels. Occasionally, heat setting too hot can cause trapped air to bubble up under the seal coat, so I generally seal baits by rubbing crazy glue, or thinned epoxy, over them before I paint, if I want a super smooth bait. But any bubbles that do appear can be popped by the sharp tip of an exacto knife, and they lay right back down when I press them with my exacto knife handle. I've never had any baits with popped bubbles fail. And, because it is totally waterproof, I don't have to worry about nicks and scuffs from rocks and hooks. Any top coat works. I've used epoxies, urethanes, and concrete sealers, with no problems. In short, it make lure building faster and easier, and that make it even more fun, so why I use it.
    1 point
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