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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/05/2021 in Posts

  1. I have a 7" wake bait I made out of balsa that was very lively due to light weight and the fish couldn't stand it. It fished very well and soon the fish won and now it is hanging in my shop with a big chunk out of it. So now I am in the process of finding a happy medium of slightly stronger wood and tougher coatings so that they will last longer. I am making a 7" Golden Shiner of my own design and 7" and 9" knock offs of the AC Plug Minnow. I have given up on the lighter weight balsa (7-8 lbs/cubic foot) and am currently making these lures out of graded balsa, medium weight (10-14 lbs/cubic foot), white pine, and western red cedar. I shape everything and cut the bill slot and vee notch and drill all my hardware holes then I epoxy my hook hangars in so I have something to hold on to and or hang it from. Then I heat them up in a food dehydrator that has a thermostat which I set to 140F. Then I coat them while holding them by the hook hangars with needle nose vise grips. Brush ready, I dip the ends in my mixing cup of Tap Plastics slow cure epoxy (Basically Clear Penetrating Epoxy) and brush everywhere I can't dip. I know it draws it into the end grain because I have to keep wetting it as it draws in. That don't happen on the sides. I don't think anything you use is going to penetrate the sides. Unless there is end grain access you are not going to get sealer to penetrate. However, everywhere you are tapering the shape of the lure exposes end grain which draws in the sealer you are using. If you want more protective coating on the sides you are going to have to apply more coats of sealer/top coat whatever you are using to get the thickness you need and/or expose the wood's end grain. JD_mudbug's technique (a couple of post above) of sanding with 60 grit will help by exposing end grain on the sides especially by sanding across the grain will allow the wood to hold more sealer. I forgot to mention that I overdrill all my hardware holes and I don't have any blind holes. That is, if the line tie, hook, or hinge holes don't go all the way through, I drill a vent hole. Also, I tried Minwax wood hardener on one of my two cedar lures and didn't find any improvement. Certainly not enough to justify the extra step.
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  2. Ben was a great guy with many helpful posts. We happened to share the same Birthday except different years . But I remember wishing each other happy Birthday. His death is a great loss to all of us. He will be missed. Don
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  3. I use 1/8" inside diameter tubing. I mostly use latex tubing as I can use it as tubing on spinner hooks and also for attaching trailer hooks to spinnerbaits and buzz baits. It is flexible enough to get over most hook eyes. For dressings, I sometimes use a few silicone strands from old skirts. Pass the strands through the hook eye, fold down, and secure it with a small piece of shrink tubing slid on over and past the eye. For a weedless spinner, you can also use swimbait hooks with corkscrews to rig any softplastic as a weedlees trailer. Attach the swimbait hook to the spinner with a split ring. I have used hooks like an Eagle CLaw 249W on spoons. You could try some hooks like those on spinners.
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