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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/09/2022 in Posts

  1. Today I made my 16 year old kid sit down with the fluid bed from TJ's, 5 of TJ's removable cups, and 5 jars of 2 oz Pro-Tec powder paint. I told him to make it work and show me each color when he had it right. He got all five colors working great. He took the full TJ's cups and dumped each back into it's original Pro-Tec jar. He then took one color at a time and added powder to to the cup a little at a time and played with the air until he got it fluid. The trick for him was to add about 1 oz. to the TJ's 2" diameter cup. He showed me every color and they were all fluid. If you tipped the cup to side it was as fluid as a liquid. Took him about half a hour and when he was done, he asked me if there was anything else I needed him to do. If any else has problems, I suggest you get a kid to do it!
    3 points
  2. You can purchase silicone for making molds. Lots of tutorials on doing this on YouTube. But for the cost Do-it molds are well worth the money. Better quality, safer, will last a lifetime. If this is a one-off custom mold then making your own for prototyping might be all right. But for any sort of production work having an aluminum mold is just a no-brainer
    2 points
  3. +1 for Titebond. It usually costs a bit more for Titebond III but it's what I use. Titebond III is slightly stronger than II and rated as waterproof. Titebond II is rated only as weatherproof/water resistant. For a 16 oz bottle, Titebond III is $1-2 more at around $8. Titebond III does take longer to dry, 10 minutes as opposed to 5. Both II and III are good enough for regular size baits. For big baits, saltwater, musky/pike, I would use III for the slightly more strength and better holding up to water penetration which is more likely in those situations. http://www.titebond.com/community/the-big-three
    2 points
  4. Regular old wood glue. Make sure the two sides going together are flat, and use a good quality glue like titebond 2, and that wood will be as good as one piece.
    2 points
  5. Hi, I thought some might be interested in the method I use to paint and coat metal lures. When I started out I I wanted to do most of the work in my garage in winter where temperatures can be pretty low, 2-4 Celsius. The lures I wanted to make was molded lures of tin, with the line going through. These are molded in suitable silicone molds. Because of the low temperature in the garage a lot of coatings like epoxy etc was not suitable. An letting them cure in the house was not really an option as it would require some ventilation system. I did not want to airbrush either as that required a lot of equipment I don't own. I have a small oven out there so powder coating was appealing. However, I wanted to be able to make more details, patterns and eyes etc. After some research I found that porcelain paint and pens cure at a suitable temperature and can be used in the house without much smell or fumes. So now I work like this: Lures are molded in the garage. Most times I give them a coating of powder coat, usually black or white, and cured in the oven. Then they are taken inside to painted with porcelain paint. This is available in a all sorts of colours, both transparent and opaque. I just use a brush or a sponge and a fine brush or a pen for smaller details. There is also possible to mix some glitters and other pigments with the porcelain paint thinner and add some sparkle or other effects. I then cure them in the oven and when they are done and still hot they are given two or three dips in clear powder coat. This method is probably not suited for any mass production but is a valid option for small scale.
    2 points
  6. For me it is wholly dependent on what type of lure we're talking about. Worms, fluke, stick baits, swimbaits- laminate craws and creatures-swirl with some exceptions for colors that are predicated by being "natural" with a lighter belly and darker top AND will be presented to the fish with that orientation in mind.
    1 point
  7. I like the twisted eye especially if I am fishing for northern pike. For bass I use the open "R". You can use a rubber skirt collar over the "R" to keep the line tie from moving up.
    1 point
  8. Scuppernong 1 cup of plastic 30 drops scuppernong (Lureworks) 4 drops cherry red (Lureworks) 4 drops black (Lurecraft) If you go to page 10 of the cookbook there is a picture in my post showing the color this makes. It's a pretty dark picture because it was beginning to rain but the color is pretty spot on. If you want to cloud it up, you can add salt or a very small amount of white to make it more opaque but I catch a ton of bass on this color every year. It is my go to color in the spring time in a lizard and does well in the summer as a 10-13" worm.
    1 point
  9. For glides you need a bit more rigidity to the tail IMHO. a floppy or soft tail for me really hurts the glide. I have used saltwater plastisol and it is ok and with hardener its better but I prefer Flex urethanes. Lots of companies have them varying in hardness I like flex it 50. These fins are made with it and are very pliable.
    1 point
  10. Have you checked the soft plastics cookbook on this site?
    1 point
  11. One other thought. If you ever plan on coloring anything you find, a good read is: Dyeing and Bleaching Natural Fly-Tying Materials by A.K. Best. You can probably find it through a public library or in a used book store.
    1 point
  12. The lightest density that I ever achieved was 0.67g/cm³ and the texture was that of English mustard and had to be injected. So, I would say that your paulownia plan is impossible. Dave
    1 point
  13. Curious what guys were having the best luck with laminating wood. I need to laminate some cedar to make make some true 2x2's for some baits i need to turn. In the past i have always just epoxied them, but wondering if there is something easier, faster and better?
    1 point
  14. Yes. I've made them out of wood, plaster of Paris (POP), hardware store silicon, and more recently out of Durham's Water Putty (DWP). Each offers pros and cons. I also bought a Do-It aluminum jig mold and if you're doing multiple pours then this is the way to go as the investment will save you lots of time and frustration. If you're only doing a few jigs at at time then a home made mold will be ok.
    1 point
  15. if your handy with a dremel tool you could make a mold of any hard wood on a budget it will work but may smoke a little bit but its cheap!
    1 point
  16. I talked to them about a month ago. The site went down and they decided not to put it back up. They are still in business, you can give them a call and they will take your order over the phone.
    1 point
  17. Hello, new guy here. I started making spinner baits in December 2020, mostly safety pin spinners. When I first started I had no clue what I was doing but I knew what I wanted for the outcome. After I assembled several baits I went to a local park lake to try them out. They all looked good but there was very little spin action. I bent the wire different ways but nothing helped. I used swing blades on them and everything looked good. I swapped out for some small willow leaf blades and those REALLY had some spin to them. My blades looked identical to the blades of the factory made baits but laying them flat on a table for comparison I saw the difference. The swing blades I bought had too much thickness/scoop. They just flopped around on the spin arm. I put a few in my bench vise and squashed them to about half their depth/thickness. That fixed the problem. I bought the first swing blades from a Chinese company on eBay. They had only chrome but a kind of hammered/rough finish. Not knowing what I wanted it took me a while to figure out they were called swing blades. This Chinese company was the only one I could find selling them. Now I have found another company and I can get them in gold, chrome and chrome ripple. I don't have to squash these. :-) So if your still having problems with the blade(s) not spinning, try flattening them some. Match the thickness of a store bought bait or actually use a store bought bait's blade to see is that works.
    1 point
  18. FYI - powder paints are subject to humidity issues and will "clump" over time resulting in some of the issues your having. I had a plastic jar of black from harbor freight sitting around for quite awhile and it "solidified" - I was able to break it back up and sift out some of the solid pebble sized clumps I couldn't break down - but be aware that sealing the powders up after use is a key to help keeping them "fluffy and flowing". J.
    1 point
  19. You got it dude!
    1 point
  20. Big Epp I can answer your question. That material is deer hair, which is hollow. When you cinch the thread down on it the hair flares out. You start tying at the rear of the hook. After you tie in each bundle of hair you pull all of the fibers straight back or pack the hair then wrap the thread in front of it. Continue this process all the way up the hook shank placing each bundle of hair directly in front of the last. Finally you trim the hair to shape.
    1 point
  21. I am just a hobby maker, but I've found that vibrating the cup by hand will loosen stubborn powder to allow better dipping. That way, I can dip without creating Mt. Vesuvius.
    1 point
  22. I like Boss powder coat. They offer some different color options for bright color combinations. Tj's has crinkle paint that allows for many colors on a jig similar to hydro dipping.
    1 point
  23. It really depends on how you are going to attach it and what your bait is molded out of. But....I have used both and I think the plastisol is faster to mold, but the Flex glues in a little getter. Still, both will work for you.
    1 point
  24. Yep, the Deep Secret. Probably the deepest diving small body lure. Speed Trap body, trench digger lip. There's nothing wrong with casting it once you get past the lack of a weight transfer chamber, some helicoptering, and the lip causing the lure to sail off course in random directions on nearly every cast.
    1 point
  25. The wire size will affect rotation if the hole in the clevis hole is too tight and doesn't spin freely. If the clevis is too big it also may not spin. The blade may not be able to spin a clevis that is too big or the wire just rattles around in the clevis holes. Another thing to watch out for are stirrup clevises that are spread apart at the ends. I have some like that. They look like more of an arch shape than a lowercase 'n'. The clevis ends were close to a 45 degree angle to the wire. I had to squeeze the ends together some with pliers to get them closer to 90 degrees to the wire in order for them to work. If the wire is too thin for the body weight, the wire can flex and dampen vibration. Initially, I made my 1 oz body spinners with .040. The blade spun but I felt almost nothing on the retrieve. When I held the bait by the line tie loop, I could see the wire was bending from the body weight. I switched those to .051 wire which did improve the feel of vibration. Your 3/8 oz body could be making the .030 wire flex. Hold the bait horizontally by the line tie in the side of the vice jaws, slide everything toward the hook like it would be on the the retrieve, and see if the wire sags down. If you have a digital scale, compare the total weight of your assembled spinners. Compare that #3 blade with the 1/4 oz body to the #5 blade with the 3/8 oz body. That is a big jump in total weight. Maybe try a 5/16 body instead of the 3/8. Look at the weight range for the rod too. It could be the larger spinners are overtaxing your rod.
    1 point
  26. I built this lathe to turn my cork handles, out of a $5.00 sewing machine motor, and $6.00 bushings.
    1 point
  27. I wanted to share some pics of my custom 2 color machine i recently built. I originally started with a single pot setup and then decided to double it up and add insulation. The original single setup had a hand crank that i decided had to go and added the motors. I designed the system to be fully scale able with bigger pots and with a modular concept. The valve system is beyond smooth and doe's not use any external o-rings!!!
    1 point
  28. I've been wanting a better way to balance my hard baits instead of guessing where the center of mass is. I built a simple balance to attempt to do this. A quick build with scrap materials.
    1 point
  29. Yup, another scale sort of thing. My digital scale was just not accurate. Cheap yes but boy did it have a range all over the place. I could get a more expensive one, but heck, it's just to find the weight of my lures when I make them. Coins have a pretty good standard weight defined by the US Mint. They can be used to make a fairly decently accurate scale. This is how I did it.
    1 point
  30. To those who are still looking for it, To save AP having to continuously emailing it out, I have turned it into a zip file on my drop box. You can download it on your computer, then windows or IOS will be able to unzip it for you. AP found that he needed an extra phone app to get it to unzip on his phone. https://www.dropbox.com/s/odywxg0ucvft1tv/Colour Cook Books.zip?dl=0
    1 point
  31. I love this topic. I taught it to 7th graders for a few years. The metric system is cool in that it has standardizations you just can't do easily in the standard system. When talking about water: 1 gram = 1cm3 = 1 ml Water has a density of 1 gram per cubic centimeter. So a 1 cm cube block of water would mass at 1 gram. You can do a lot with this. There are two ways to make something float more. Make it bigger for it's weight, or make it lighter for it's size. Take a 50,000 ton block of steel. It sinks. Shape it into a battleship and it floats. It has nothing to do with the air in it. It's the size. The same block of steel, when made larger will float more in water. It's size has to get larger than it's weight (to put it roughly). If you have a lure that has a mass of 10 grams, and is 10 cm3 in volume, it won't float or sink in water. It will stay at the level it is put at. If you have a lure that has a mass of 10 grams and is 11 cm3 in volume, it will float in water. And sink if the numbers are reversed. Oil has a density less than 1 gram per cm3. So the same lure will sink in it. And of course oil, which seems denser because it appears thicker than water is actually lighter, oil floats on water. This principle causes submarines to work, weather to happen, plate tectonics to occur, computer chips to be made... and a myriad of other things. Things in this universe can be explained by some basic principles you can count on one hand. Density is one of them. Thanks for your indulgence. I retired awhile back but I still have the ability to get long winded in the sciences at the drop of a hat. Ask my kids.
    1 point
  32. I use the nylon weed guards from the medium size ( 2 strands ) for the wacky rig hooks . 4 strands for the drop shot hooks and smaller finesse wide gap hooks . 1 ) Lay some thread wraps down for a base , flat thread keeps it looking nice and won't bulk up at hook eye . 2 ) Place weed guard material and wrap with flat thread as shown , whip finish with four or five wraps . 3 ) Bend back the fibers with finger to position them and trim to length , I hit the ends with a little heat to round off sharp edges . 4 ) Apply some Hard as Nails and let dry . I have found these can be bent, splayed , or positioned very easily and have held up for years and so easy to do .
    1 point
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