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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/16/2021 in Posts

  1. Exx1976 - I do not understand you. I have refrained from posting this sentiment before. You put a lot of effort in, making excellent contributions to the TU community, gaining a lot of respect. And then, you seem to have a brain fart and chop someone off at the knees for very little reason. I am not blame free, I too have had my moments of indiscretion. I suggest you think your more acidic replies through before hitting the reply button! Dave
    11 points
  2. #6 Don't quit your day job.
    6 points
  3. here are some videos, not the best but you get the idea. https://youtu.be/KPsVzycUTf0 https://youtu.be/YY0KLwPxOkY https://youtu.be/XjENNdaTFR4
    6 points
  4. I have a different opinion on what it takes to do this for a living. If you don’t like what you are doing now then it makes it easier to maybe change. While all the other posts are spot on there is another option. While it’s nice to have your own product and put them in shops you could on the other hand pour for someone who has the task of selling them. Most people here will tell you it is very hard to make a profit making baits but I know some who make a lot of money doing so. And it is much more than you might think. I will not mention exact numbers because you need to know that it is a lot of WORK. Yes that four letter word. Working with small larger company’s can be very profitable. But never let them dominate your time because if they cut you off then you are screwed. Do less work for more company’s and all your eggs will not be in the same basket. You will have to understand how you utilize your time is key to making baits. Waiting is not an option you need to keep doing something to get ahead. Keep your day job for say 6 months. Take the rest of your time investing in to your bait business. Get to a point that you can have enough molds and a system to pour that will get you where you need to be. Whatever system you use to pour you need to be able to change colors fast so you don’t have to wait. With a small guy you have to do smaller runs and multiple colors a day to make it work. For much more on how to do it you can pm me and I can enlighten you for days. Your dream can happen and you can do it if you want to WORK.
    5 points
  5. Gained about $2000 or more in sales last year just by giving away a handful of blemish lures at lakes that cost me maybe $100 in materials. It’s even better when the father of the kid calls me to buy some lures because his kid out fished him that day. Nothing sells lures better then fisherman seeing them catch fish I tell every kid that I give a lure to it’s their lure and Dad is not allowed to use it Think of it as investing in advertisement
    5 points
  6. Yep, the Deep Secret. Probably the deepest diving small body lure. Speed Trap body, trench digger lip. There's nothing wrong with casting it once you get past the lack of a weight transfer chamber, some helicoptering, and the lip causing the lure to sail off course in random directions on nearly every cast.
    4 points
  7. I would suggest moving your line tie a little higher on the nose and try that before changing lip location. Personally I think your lip needs to be moved forward some also. I've had to move a lip forward before to get a bait to wake better. I had to remove the old lip, fill the slot and cut a newer slot a fair amount forward. We called it the Frankenbait, as it had been cut apart and glued back together in various places, but it worked afterward. As Dave and JD above stated, try a shorter, wider lip. I've found those tend to get a taller profile bait like a gill, to wake better. The lip you're showing will want to make the bait dive or crank down, IMHO. Depending on how you have the bait ballasted, how low it floats in the water will also effect how it swims. Mine worked best as a very low float, barely floating with the back just out of the water, throws a great dual wake. The lip and nose create the big V wake and the tail will create swirling vortiscies{sp} to each side, inside the V wake. I would move the front hook hanger back a hair also, looks like the front treble will hang up on the lip when casting. That's a great looking bait, nice carving and paint, get er' waking and she will get crushed!! Here are a couple pics of a gill wake I made after moving all the components to get it to wake nice. This is a resin bait BTW, 6 inch long and just under 5 oz. Good luck moving forward with this bait and Happy Holidays to all!
    4 points
  8. I've not seen anything for spindle blanks. But there are plenty of CNC wood engravers that you could make half sides of crankbaits with to make mold masters. You could also probably make halves of any lure to though wire. I've contemplated this but never pulled the trigger and i just do low volume and like to carve lol.
    4 points
  9. Never used it, but most slow cure epoxy products hold up over time and most fast cure get brittle and yellow over time. If it is fully cured in 30, I suspect it will yellow in about one year. If 30 minutes is the working time, it should be good.
    4 points
  10. Here is a gill detail I came up with ( at least have not seen before ) , I am making a top water and flat sided crankbait and will be layering a light color next to collar and darker on top for contrast . Think this will be cool detail
    4 points
  11. If one person was always right he/she would own the fishing industry, but that is not the case!! We all have had great years followed by not so great years.... as conditions change from year to year so does the fishing.
    4 points
  12. Like most opinion pieces put out by fisherman I believe some of it holds merit but a lot of it is just opinion biased on his fishing style My opinion attraction is based on flicker/flash, noise/vibration and overall visibility true triggering traits are that show weakness/opportunity or create the fish to fear a loss of opportunity. Weakness is a pause, fall, or small twitch showing struggles to move. Drawing on a now or never response is a long pull/jerk, variation in speed and veering to the side Above is the main factors I consider when creating a lure and what I choose to fish with. Water color is acknowledged but I also consider how close my presentation will be to the fish. For example I have caught lots of bass in muddy water flipping dark color lizards into cover. I have also had great results trolling Lakers with bright noisy crank baits in crystal clear water One I am dropping on the fishes nose the other I am drawing fish in from a distance There is a ton of other factors I consider but it would be writing a novel lol We all have our opinions and in the end if it works keep doing it. If not change something
    4 points
  13. I work for a large company in a product development role. I can tell you this, the bigger the company the less they care if the product "works" right. What they need to do is sell stuff profitably good bad or otherwise. Most have great ideas internally that never see daylight due to timing, market or whatever. Personally if i had a great bait that i could reproduce consistent quality catches and is manufacturable, you'd be better off doing an LLC. There is enough power in social media these days to not need the big companies anymore. Its a great time for entrepreneurs imho.
    4 points
  14. Let me rephrase that. They come out of the mold & they are oilier when warm until they've had time tocool & cure, but after a little time i really like the results. I think it's a little clearer than the calhouns too. Anyway it being a different plastic & me getting use to the slight differences between it & calhouns i'm completely satisfied with the baitplastics stuff.
    4 points
  15. Gliders will glide better if tapered, better as in farther. The more torpedo shaped the better in that respect. A lipped crank bait can be either, but as Hillbilly said, shape can and will change action (some better and some worse).
    4 points
  16. First you need to be brutally honest with the numbers. Many guys aren't. The time spent, the cost of materials, etc.. all end up disappearing when they think about how much they are making. One also need to look at what they really make at their job including benefits. I will use the average US salary of 38K (I don't consider this as a well paying job). Currently I get health insurance, dental and vision insurance, 10 paid holidays, 4 weeks paid vacation, sick time, short term disability, long term disability, 401 k match, social security, gym membership, life insurance, bonus, and other perks. At one time we also had an ESOP plan that added up to a nice chunk of money after a few years. I work 40 hrs a week. So for me to quit I have to match the effort and total compensation above. Everyone is different just something to include in thinking. For some it wouldn't be as difficult as they may be covered on spouse insurance, don't worry about life insurance, retirement, etc.... Add start up costs, depreciation of equipment, write offs, etc...into the equation. So yes it can be done. Statistically you will not be successful but the more thought and research you put into it the more likely you are to succeed.
    4 points
  17. I wouldn't be concerned with the tape, but with what’s under it. Raw wood? Foam? Expanded pvc trim? I make wood baits and foil them. There has to be a waterproof/gas proof coating under the foil or any heating of the lure will cause outgassing and bubbled foil (whether heated by you when finishing the lure or by the user storing the lure in a hot compartment).
    4 points
  18. I guess if I was in the lure business, mine would be labelled 'NOT made in USA'. Dave
    4 points
  19. JD - The spherical domain enclosed by the tall man's spell of 4πr³/3 is an intriguing and fascinating subject. It is the simplest shape and yet the most difficult to carve. I have actually experimented with spherically derived shapes and the resulting actions are interesting. If you pull a sphere through water you get a pure spiral action. I do most of my cranial development work while sleeping, so you could say that I work in an alternative universe Dave
    4 points
  20. You are correct and many would find making baits is a losing endeavor if they put any dollar value on their time. Building cranks one off is about the least efficient way to make cranks. Multiples pay off as less time is wasted setting up tools, measurements, etc.. Some aspects are rather quick so may just knock out a bunch of blanks for future use. May take 30 minutes and drill all the hook hanger and belly weights, etc.. (jig holds the blank in position on drill press). I will just keep blanks in plastic shoe boxes or shallow tool box trays in different stages. If time really becomes important and you don't mind switching media. Taking a master and molding it a few times will allow you to really kick out finished baits in a hurry.
    4 points
  21. People do not buy hand made baits because they are cheap, they buy because the lure is unique and of the highest quality. Your bait has to gain a reputation for catching MORE fish than the chunk of plastic on the shelf at Walmart. Yes, you need a pro angler on board who believes in your lure. A Kevin Van Dam is not going to get the job done, people will not attribute his success to the lure but to the man himself. I would take my lure to a struggling pro, get him to try the lure, prove that it is a fish magnet, then you can both retire on the lure's success. Only my opinion; charging $10ph is not doing you or your lure's reputation any good at all, you might as well just give them away. No, I am not rich. I cannot afford to live in my birth country of UK and certainly could not afford to live in USA. A few years ago, I lowered my charge rate to $25ph to do some mold design work. I regretted that decision, it stuck in my throat and formed an indigestible knot in my belly. I vowed never to do that again. My last paid design job was $100ph although I could be tempted out of bed for $70ph for a short engagement. Like I said, not rich. My philosophy was always work to live, not live to work. Here is a quote from George Best: "I spent a lot of my money on booze, birds and fast cars, the rest I just squandered." Dave
    4 points
  22. This is a tale of multiple ‘happy accidents’ making a memorable lure. I have a bond with this lure that is tempting me to not retire it, even though it belongs on the wall now. My favorite lure is one I call Dicky Moe after the whale in a Tom & Jerry cartoon. The cartoon whale was the first thing I thought of when the lure was finished. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bttiQVVweJE It is all white, 9.75” long, and weighs 3.1 oz. without the hooks. The bait came out longer than expected because I forgot to take into account the joint gaps would add close to an inch of length because I used big gate eye screws for hardware. The V cuts for the joints don’t mesh perfectly and are ‘close enough’. I made numerous mistakes during its construction. I was so disappointed with its appearance that I was ashamed to fish with it initially. Dicky Moe was my first attempt at a big bait. I wanted to make it a simple design. I started with a section of 1-1/8” diameter poplar dowel. I just rounded the nose and tapered the back half of the bait down a bit. It is clunky and amateurish. I screwed up the eye sockets. I eyeballed the locations with a hand drill (no pun intended). The eyes are not in the same spot on both sides. The drill bit walked making the edges of the sockets jagged and not perfectly round. The lure looks a bit cross-eyed. I made another mistake in sealing the bait. I soaked the body sections in MinWax Wood Hardener for a day. Wood Hardener will work a sealer, but it has a long off-gas time. I did not know this at the time. Soaking the sections for that long probably requires a month of off-gassing with that stuff. This would cause the paint and clear coat to separate from the body later on. I finished the parade of screw ups when I installed the lip. I was trying for a 70 degree angle. I cut the slot too big for the Lexan. I used 2 pieces of blue tape like tent rope supports to hold the lip in place while the epoxy cured in the slot. The lip shifted and I ended with an 85 degree angle lip, just slightly forward of straight 90 degree down. The lip ended up being slightly tilted, not straight across the bait. The lip reminds me of a snowplow blade, titled to push the snow off the road. Despite its ugly appearance, it has great action. It wriggles and clacks on the surface. The sections whack against each other. With my rod tip down, it bulges just below the surface. It makes a big wake. In its debut, I caught 3 fish on it, all largemouth, 2 to 3.5 pounds. After that first trip, some off the painted lifted from the body. This problem would pop-up throughout Dicky Moe’s life. Through the years, I would peel off the lifting section, cut it off with a razor blade and patch that section with random white paints and epoxies. The lure is now has uneven color ranging from bright white to some spots that have ambered. The clear coat is uneven due to overlapping patch jobs. I keep catching fish on it including several over 5 lbs. Years ago, I decided to not strip the paint. I have just kept on patching it. I don’t want to strip the paint and possibly ruin Dicky’s mojo. Dicky Moe was responsible for one of my favorite fishing memories. 3 years ago, I was fishing off the dock at my parents’ lake house. They were having an extended family bbq with over 30 people attending to celebrate my oldest uncle’s birthday. I decided to take a few casts while waiting for food. My relatives made numerous jabs about the ‘ridiculous’ size of my lure. On the second cast, I caught a 2.5 lb. largie which surprised my relatives. I was then able to respond with “never doubt the master”. A couple of minutes later, as the lure was no more than 10 feet from the dock, the lure got hammered. The strike was like someone threw a bowling bowl in the water. After a brief but intense fight, including a massive tail splash that sprayed me, I landed a 7.2 lb. largie which stunned everyone. There is nothing quite like catching a big fish in front of audience that was mocking your lure. Dicky Moe has a special place in my heart. It continually reminds that a lure’s appearance does not necessarily relate to its effectiveness. It has provided faithful service for a decade. It will probably go on the wall this year. One of the big gate screws does not look secure anymore. When I die, I want to be cremated with this lure along with some my other favorites. This pics don’t really show how mottled the paint is. One pic is with a SK 2.5 squarebill for a size comparison. After looking at the pics, I never noticed how crooked and misplaced some of the eye screws are.
    4 points
  23. JD_mudbug – Great comments, covered most of what I was going to write. You should follow his suggestions first, as my suggestions are purely based on theory. First a disclosure, I have never built a wake bait. The bait looks like it would swim nice without a lip, with the tow eye just below the chin as shown in the 3rd pic (end view). The lure attitude is determined by a balance of forces above the tow eye and below the tow eye, in other words, the force of the water on the back of the lure balance the force of the water on the lip. What I see happening, is the water forces on the lip force the lure nose down. This moves the lip passed vertical and so the length of the lip is effectively reduced as seen in the swim direction, this reduces the force on the lip. At the same time, the back of the body rises and so the forces acting on the back increase. The result of these forces means that the bait rotates/rocks nose up then nose down, and then the whole process repeats, resulting in the bait rocking up and down rather than producing vortices that will give you the side swimming action that you are looking for. Try shortening the lip, possibly by a lot, but do it gradually. If this does not work then angle the lip more forward, say 10° and adjust lip length again. As long as the lip is not pushed passed vertical then the lure will find a stable balance, and will generate side vortices. Once the lip passes vertical then it cannot reach a balanced state. I know, complicated. Not my fault Dave
    3 points
  24. I learned from the store "Tap Plastics" where I buy some epoxy and "lexan" scraps that it is OK to apply Epoxy over Polyester (UV resin) but it is not OK to apply Polyester over Epoxy.
    3 points
  25. You can use the search feature at the top right or under the ‘Activity’ button to look up clear coat posts. There are a lot of posts with lots of tips. Which ones have you tried already? I have used Devcon 2 Ton (D2T), Envirotex Lite (Etex), and Bob Smith Industries (BSI) and they all can work well. They all can also have issues if not used correctly. Avoid 5 minute epoxies for clear coats as they tend to yellow and can cure too quickly to level out. Look for ones with a 30 minute or longer working time. I mostly use D2T now because it is readily available where I am and it seems to be tolerant of environmental factors. Everybody has their own preference. I plan on trying Crystal Clear Epoxy from East Coast resins in the near future. Someday, I will get around to building a UV resin curing light box and try that. Your picture of craters is also called ‘fish eyes’. That term should help in your searches. As others have pointed out, the most common causes of this are surface contamination, missing spots when applying, and not using the clear coat properly. Surface contamination can occur from touching the bait with your fingers and leaving oils on the paint, the paint not being fully dry, or dust settling on the lure after painting. Try to not to touch the bait and use disposable gloves. You may want to try a spray mid-coat like Rustoleum 2X Clear Matte or Krylon Matte Clear if the problem continues. Do your sanding in another room or outside to avoid dust. Sweep or shop-vac when you have no painting or clear coating planned. Use a heat gun or hair dryer to set the paint and also to blow off any dust just before clear coating. You may want to let the paint dry overnight. It is also possible the sealer or paint you used is still off-gassing. Off-gassing usually produces blisters or areas where the clear coat and paint peel off, and not craters. Another problem could be that the paint itself does not allow good adhesion even when dry. Some metallic paints in particular can have this problem. This problem can be solved by spraying a clear mid-coat before the final clear coat. Missing spots or applying the epoxy too thin will create fish eyes. Your fish eyes appear along the back ridge of that lure. You may have missed that area with the epoxy or put it on too thin. On thicker epoxies, you could thin the epoxy with a couple of drops of denatured alcohol to make it easier to apply. Missing spots was a problem I had before I got a bright light to look over the bait closely. You need to get real close to the bait and may want to use a magnifying glass. Right after applying the clear coat, rotate the bait under a bright light to look for bare spots or uneven clear coat. Look at the glare from the light on the surface of the bait. Deviations or wavy-ness in the glare mean missing or thin epoxy. Pay particular attention to around the hook hangers, line tie, diving bill, any corners or ridges like a gill plate or fin ridge, any sharp curves like the back and belly of the lure. Look for areas that would block a clean brush stroke when applying the clear. You may be mixing the epoxy in too big of a batch, trying to do too many baits at once. The epoxy could be setting up while you are applying it. It does not have time to level out on the bait. You may have to do smaller batches. On my large baits, 7+ inches and 3+ oz., I do one bait at a time. Make sure you follow the instructions of the clear coat you are using. Mix the correct ratio. You may need a digital scale for this or disposable measuring cups. After using D2T for so long, I am able to eyeball this. Try mixing with a plastic stick as opposed to wood. I use disposable paint brushes to apply my clear. I cut off half of the plastic handle for use as a mixing stick. Don’t mix on a surface that can add contamination. Mix thoroughly. Find the temperature and humidity information for the clear coat on the package or their website. Most clear coats have a preferred temperature and humidity. You may need AC, heat, a humidifier, or dehumidifier if you are not close to the optimal temp and humidity. You may want to warm the bottles in a bowl of warm water before mixing if they are stored below the optimal temperature. Try to avoid clearing on rainy or high humidity days. If you are using a rotisserie to cure the baits, make sure the baits are not rocking as they rotate. This can happen with larger lures. You may need a 3rd point to secure the bait from the belly hanger to keep it from rocking. You want the bait to not move on the rotisserie as the rotisserie spins. Big baits have a tendency to flip on the rotisserie if only secured at the two ends. Rocking or flipping can prevent the epoxy for leveling out. I don’t know what clear coats you have available in Australia. There has to some that will work well if the instructions are followed carefully. It may seem like a pain to pay attention to the proper procedures. But once you get used to it, it becomes second nature. Below are some other posts on clear coats. Jim https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/37686-tacky-epoxy-check-your-temps/ https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/37532-new-guy-old-questions/ https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/12510-trying-to-achieve-a-flawless-finish/ https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/36877-epoxy-issues-and-lure-turner-questions/?tab=comments#comment-301056
    3 points
  26. The best silvery finish I have achieved is with Silver Leaf. It looks great for the silver sided Kokanee Salmon. It is available at Michael's and Hobby Lobby. It's the stuff they use to emboss picture frames in gold or silver. I didn't use the spray adhesive, I still used D2T. After mixing a small amount of D2T, I used a finger cot to rub a very thin layer of D2T on one side of the bait. Then you have to "float" this very very thin sheet of silver leaf and let it decend on the bait. Tap the silver leaf down on the bait very gently using only a cotton ball. Then I turn it over on a towel but I have the towel covered with saran wrap (food stretch wrap). Do the other side, fold the stretch wrap over it. Then I sandwich it between two pieces of foam padding on the floor and set my tool box on it. Come back the next day, stretch wrap comes off, coat with epoxy again to protect the silver leaf.
    3 points
  27. I've been working on some jerbaits (think rapala or smithwick jerkbait), and have been working on getting the action I want from the lures. I found this video today, and really appreciated the view of different jerkbait actions.
    3 points
  28. I exchanged a few messages with Harry Simmons (sales rep for Victory) and it seems they are starting out with the most popular sizes and styles. My opinion is they are taking advantage of the covid sales boom, and the fact that often in the last year items were out of stock from older known vendors. I recently was asked to work on a project using some Victory hooks. I was sent Mustad, Eagle Claw, and Victory hooks in the same sizes. I found on testing the Victory hooks were very sticky sharp. At a glance they look very good and on pull testing they were as strong before permanent bend as similar size premium hooks. Since I do custom work and I am often asked for a "perfect" (no such thing) fit for a particular hook I started measuring across batches of hooks. The one thing i noticed is visibly there was not any real difference, but when I started measuring and fitting the Victory hooks I had slightly less consistency in exact shape than other premium hooks and even some regular line hooks. Its not horrific, but I had to make things a little sloppier. The eyes weren't consistently the same flatness. The shanks weren't consistently the same straightness. The radius and angle of the bend (90 in this case) were not perfect from hook to hook. I think for a cross over hook in a Do-It mold it would be no issue as for the most part Do-It molds tend to have greater looseness tolerance for hooks. If you have a custom mold that is a "perfect" fit for a particular hook and you are trying to cross over a Victory hook it was not made for you may need to file a little clearance or have to expect some resistance to closing the mold as it forces the hooks into the slots. Does this mean I think Victory hooks are bad? No. They are sticky sharp, and they are as strong for their wire size as any other premium hook. They are using good metallurgy What about the size/shape/fitment tolerance? It should be ok. Like I said, they will probably work just fine in mass produced molds that also have loose tolerances. At worst you may have to jiggle the mold and press a little in a custom mold crossover that it wasn't specifically designed for it. Does that mean they are no good for custom molds? No. any custom mold maker can make a mold that will fit most of any hook you choose. Just make sure they have an ample sample size to test and measure. Don't be that guy who sends one hook and says "fit this one." Does this mean I shouldn't buy Victory hooks if I'm that guy who's voice goes up in pitch when I say the word EXACTLY? Not at all. They are very good, decent price, and better than many lower end hooks from many of the major manufacturers. Beside YOU CAN GET THEM. Even when I saw other hooks as unavailable and sold out I was able to get Victory hooks. Yeah, but you seemed to go out of your way to point out their shortcomings. I also tried to point out their strengths. Every hook was sticky sharp. The wire quality and metallurgy is very good, the price is good, and they are available. Now I am going to let you in on a little secret. I have chatted with Harry Simmons off and on for years. Mostly be email and a few times by phone. I started talking with him when he worked at Mustad, and he has history going back further than that. In my opinion he's not going to keep representing a product that isn't constantly evolving and improving. As consistent as Mustad hooks are he still would talk the actual manufacturing plants trying to get better and better consistency so that every hook in a model and size was always "perfectly" interchangeable with any other of that size and model number. I doubt that he left that drive for better and better product behind. The Victory hooks are good now, and they will be getting better over time.
    3 points
  29. Here is my first attempt , not the most symmetrical . Next time I will glue the two ends of gills before putting in place . Turned out pretty cool , Thanks guys More pics in galley
    3 points
  30. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUd5zpGwA5Y The loudest rattling bait I have made was based on the above video. Drill a small pilot hole through the body being careful to avoid internal hardware. Then, I used a forstner bit on each side to drill out a disc on each side just a hair deeper than a dime. I think it was a ¾” bit, maybe 5/8”. A dime should sit being just a hair under flush. Once the disc holes are drilled, use a ½” (or 3/8”) bit to widen the pilot hole going through the bait. Seal the hole with superglue. Put one dime in place and glue/epoxy it in. Once dry, place that dime side face down and drop in the biggest diameter steel ball (or 2) that will fit in the hole going through the bait. Glue/epoxy in the dime on the other side to cap the hole being careful to only get glue on disc cut. Use epoxy, super glue & baking soda, or bondo to make the dime face flush to the surface of the body. It should just need a skim coat. The steel ball will whack against the dimes which are just at the edge of the body. On a wide body bait, this will be very loud. You can downsize this set up with smaller metal discs and a smaller balls if the dimes won’t fit in the body. My local hardware store sells assorted size stainless ball bearings in the pull out box racks. You can cut small discs out of sheet metal if you can’t find any. If you have to trash a defective or broken plastic bait, make sure to smash it open and take any steel balls for future use.
    3 points
  31. I have posted this complex sinusoidal idea many times, in the last post of comments page 2 for example. I have even drawn the graphs on post No19 of this link. I might have posted some 14 years ago when I first thought of the idea and experimented with it, but may have kept it to myself at that time. I am very impressed that you arrived at the graphs independently, good engineering mind. Simple harmonic motion is always on an architect’s mind when designing tall thin structures or long bridges. There have been famous disasters due to combinations of SHM and vortex shedding. I do think that the double sinusoidal action has a chance of an explanation for your tail-spin lure, but not the Bass-Oreno, that is more likely caused by my definition of hunting, the lip passing 90° on the retrieve. On the tail-spin, the two actions are quite separated. Here is a video of a lure that I was experimenting with called ‘Big Ed’. It is a soft bait with a bulbous nose and a tail boot. The large sinusoidal motion is too slow to be assigned regular vortex shedding and so I am inclined to think that a complex sinusoidal action is going on. See what you think. Dave
    3 points
  32. I don't mean to stir this boiling pot, but I am old enough and fish enough that I have had several lures break in my day. Funny, they were normally the older two piece cheep molded lures or the through wire balsa lures. I have had the OLD wooden lures that had the poor seal coats have screws rust out, and I have had a few Lucky Craft Live Pointers where the "through wire" on the multiple joints broke. But....... Guys, they are lures, not bridges. If a few break, people don't die.
    3 points
  33. I exclusively build bass lures and if a bass ever breaks one of my non-thru-wired balsa baits I will gratefully and cheerfully salute the beast as he swims off with half my lure in its mouth. Hundreds of crankbaits, hundreds of bass, I’m still waiting. I don’t think thru-wiring offers added strength to a lure compared to well designed and installed hardwire. But build crankbaits however you think is best for the species you target.
    3 points
  34. What I always find interesting when it comes to to debating the lure construction strength is most are not considering is the shear range in size/power of fish people target with lures. Most are comparing lure construction to species like bass where 10lbs is big and failing to realize this is a small fish to some who target larger species I would be choked if someone built me a lure for a tarpon trip using the same construction they used for largemouth I have had big chinook, lake trout, and pike break lures. I have had pike break hangers twisting in a net/cradle. Chinook have pulled out hangers/break hangers. I have had big Lakers crack hollow plastic plugs/crankbaits on the strike and break hangers rolling in the net Through wire is not needed for the species I just listed but construction that some are assuming is good enough will experience failure. Theses are not even true big game species either What some view unnecessary/overkill may be just what is needed for another. There is a big difference between building lures for panfish and saltwater big game species
    3 points
  35. SlowFish that is the lure I mentioned in an earlier post, thanks for sharing that. There was a video on youtube several years ago that showcased and explainted the theroy and reasoning, along with action and results. Very cool. azsouth, great work explaining how you arrived at your conclusion. Several years ago when I had the test tank I had planned on trying something like this, never got around to it, to busy I guess, but great work anyway and thanks for sharing. Dave, I think we talked about this sometime ago, I was on a Japaneese Crankbiat kick and then swithced to your Hunting theroy because it called to me. Like I said in previous post's I have had success using Vodkaman's theroy and method, which in short is making the Diving bill longer and trimming it to get the desired action. There is alot more to it but that is the skinny of it. Please correct me if I'm wrong, I've even got myself in trouble or accused of absurdity when I mentioned this, the thought of tuning your crankbaits can be a touchy subject with some builders. So in general one thing I've learned from several guys here on TU, theres a lot of information that can be applied if we are only willing to think outside the box, or try something that does not makes sense at the time. When I take a dozen or more crankbasits to the lake my fishing partner and others look at me like I'm crazy and ask why do you spend so much time tuning crankbaits? HeHe! I build my crankbaits in weights, diving bill lengths, design and other ideas for a purpose, which is build a crankbiat for each application I think I need, and to try to perfect the action to the best of my ability, which does include tuning. Which brings us to whole other subject we can discuss on another thread. It's ideas, thoughts and applied science that makes this stuff happen so once agian I tip my Hat to you guys here on TU. Rich
    3 points
  36. Same experiences when cutting baits open. I want my lures to last but think of lures being more of a consumable product. If wanting to build something more bulletproof then I jump to 2 part polyurethane foams as water intrusion is no longer and issue and can still get a very "lively" bait. I really never have had many issues with balsa but don't build near the baits I do with basswood and no where in numbers as I used to do. D-Baits.... brings back some good memories.
    3 points
  37. Just because you don't know the answer does not make the question 'stupid', in fact, the opposite is true As for the answer, I think it is side injection. Dave
    3 points
  38. I've been really happy with medium from baitplastics.com.
    3 points
  39. The round head of tube bait is obtained by the concave shaped cork that close one end of PVC pipe. You have to chose a cork with an external diameter that fit without any clearance the inner diameter of pipe. You can shape the concave with a round grindstone. Finally let seall the cork with the working tape. The thickness will be not the same in all length, but thicker in portion close to the head and thinner where you will cut the stripes of the tail. The results are really performing tube baits ... that catch Pikes. Bye Cami
    3 points
  40. Quick tip..if you want to try different sizes or styles of bills in your bait..you can use elmers rubber cement...It is plenty strong to hold for testing..Then when you decide on the Bill the rubber cement peals off clean then us Devcon 2ton or similar to permanently install them..Nathan
    3 points
  41. This bait wakes at low speeds, and runs slightly sub-surface on a faster retrieve:
    3 points
  42. That's because they are a layered material, and one of the layers is acrylic.
    3 points
  43. Search the form for ballast calculator. There have been many discussions on this in the past about buoyancy and density and weight etc.. Here is an example Epoxy weight and/or density? Buoyancy spreadsheet questions - Hard Baits - TackleUnderground.com If you know the density of the material you are using based on the grams per centimeters cubed measurement, you can use the woods weight in grams, or volume in cm cubed to figure out exactly how much lead would get you to achieve neutral buoyancy. Then you could add/subtract as you desire. This is all based on Archimedes principle which I "understand" barely lol. It's all about the volume - my mind was blown when only even kind of understood that. The good thing is! @Vodkaman has put together a ballast calculator spreadsheet that lets you plug your numbers in and much smarter/technical people like him have done the legwork for math and putting it in a simple to use spreadsheet. I, like a lot of builders, use much more trial and error method. But the calculator has helped me to hone in on the correct number very quickly!
    3 points
  44. UKandy, On Bass plugs kinda the same here. My Balsa baits do vary and it really does depend on the lot of Balsa, I've built suspending baits and used 4.5 - 6.5 grams, but swithced or ordered a different lot of wood and seen it change + or minus 1/2 gram, then getting real technical Ive ordered hooks from same mfg, same hook and seen similar changes. I'm not an expert on Balsa but I do know there are several densities that will effect your builds. I bought a fairly large lot several years ago and it was suppose to be the same density, it was not and it took me forever to get it figured out, I had to build and test each bait individually to get the same results. Also switching from different sealers, paint and clear coats has proven to effect my end results as well, so it basically led me to finish / test baits one at a time to get them as close as possible. The one thing I've learned, it's not that critical on high floaters, fast risers, square bills, etc. but when your trying to get a bait to be neutral or suspend the prise is in the small details, but it makes for a much better performing bait, in my opinion. I have a buddy that fishes alot of bigger Tournaments, he buys his Crankbaits by the dozen, takes them to the lake for test & tune day, I've spent a few days with him doing this and it's taught me alot about what he's looking for and how he seperates or segregates his crankbaits. Fast risers, Medium risers, etc. He also tries to guage the depth and diving performance ( how fast it gets down to desired depth ) on his plugs as well. He takes several dozen spends the day with them and marks on the bills ( sharpie ) of his findings. He said it's the only way he can make quick decisions and choose the right crankbait for the depth ( fish ) he's targeting. A few years back I built him several medium diving plugs ( 8' - 12' ) we went to a local lake that has alot of grass, we found deeper grass that was about a foot below the surface, he said I'll show you a few tricks. He fished those crankbaits most of the day finding what it took to get them to touch or dive into the grass, then made changes, rods with Mono / vrs Flouro or Braid. Switched hooks, added bigger O Ring on line tie, etc. He could almost call his shot and get the plugs to just barely touch the grass or get them to dive into it. I was surprised on how critical he was and after watching him it made me understand the reasoning. He also suggested I build plugs for situations, instead of trying to mass produce them. Meaning, if we are going to take the time to build these lures and want them to outperform other plugs on the market, we must first and foremost understand what that plug will do. I cannot remember who told me this it might have been Travis? but he said many years ago a famous ( great angler ) known for 3 intials, used to buy hundreds of custom balsa / wood crankbaits in hopes of getting a few great ones? Dont quote me on that but thats what I remember. Now I'm not suggesting plug builders today are any better than the older plug makers a few years ago I'm just saying if that was the case a few years ago, it's probably the same still today? Anyway sorry to ramble, but I'm no where near where I was 3-5 years ago and my thoughts and ideas have certainly changed ( for the better ) in my opinion, but I took Travis advice and have built much better plugs recently and owe alot of it to him. Thanks happy plug building and tight lines when you get a chance to fish them. Rich
    3 points
  45. Testing multiple lip styles is simple a layer of masking tape and pressure fit it into the slot. Lips with the line tie in the lip I drill holes in the lip in possible locations. I then have a wire I slip through the hole and sucre with tape around the belly. You are SOL testing multiple slot positions I have my prototype testing systems all figured out just ask how to deal with each issue. I have a lot of ways to test action without putting in too much work into a lure
    3 points
  46. Bring back finger painting!!!
    3 points
  47. Use epoxy filler. It thickens up specifically to do what you are hoping for and is really strong. Very common in the marine industry. If you look at like the West system 400 line (i use 404) there are multiple densities. There are also many other manufacturers that do the same thing.
    3 points
  48. exx1976 I made most out of resin and some cedar. People some liked the cedar and some liked the resin ones so that is part of why I am stepping back now, I will just take my time at 78 i am not going to think to far down the line my one son shows some interest and my one grandson worked with me. I just enjoy doing it maybe one big rummage sale late summer and a couple flea markets to sell what I have. One thing at flea markets some people just want to chew you down and another comes and tells you great work with no chewing down because they say they know what goes into making a lure. Here's a good one I had a lure for 18.00 and a guy comes up and says he will give me ten I told him I already came down from 50 bucks he walked away the next guy comes up and buys two and was very happy. That's the way it goes. Wayne
    3 points
  49. Yea, if it isn't right I for sure don't sell it. They go into my tackle box, or a close friend to use and test. If it has my name on it and I sell it, I want it to have good finish. Otherwise, you will be selling all your lures for discount, or other potential customers will see a sub par product. I like the idea of giving them to kids, but yea as a musky lure maker that might be tough lol. Honestly, I don't make/paint tons of lures, so I will usually take the messed up lures, and start over with it. Put a different paint job on it, or experiment with it. I have a bunch of lures on my "wall of shame" that will never go out to anyone lol. I agree with Big Epp, I'll test something out for anyone!
    3 points
  50. I make 5 to 10 at a time and I make them out of resin I do very little wood other that the first one for testing. Although I like wood better some guys will only fish wood I make mostly musky baits. Wayne
    3 points
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