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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/02/2021 in Posts

  1. #6 Don't quit your day job.
    6 points
  2. I wanted to give an update on my ordering placed back in late January/early February. Amazingly I received my custom cut aluminum bugmolds.com the end of last week. Dang! Those fellas did an amazing job simply off a few pictures of a bait. I just saw they updated their site stating the shop is back up and running too.
    5 points
  3. This is an update to an older post. It is long so I made a new post. Luhr Jensen Speed Trap – old vs. new, and the new Norman Speed N. Pre-2006 Speed Traps were made in the USA. The new ones are made in China. I compared 4 old ones to 4 new ones. In my unscientific opinion, I think the new baits are made with the same butyrate plastic and in the same or similar molds. The plastic feels and looks the same. The clear coat on the new baits does appear to be different from the old baits. The clear coat on the new baits is thicker. This resulted in slightly different dimension between the old and new baits. The diving depth for all 8 models appeared to be around 7’ on 12 lb. Yozuri Hydrid Line. The actions of the new and old baits seem identical. I fished all baits on the same rod with the same reel. The vibration from bait to bait was the same. I was fishing in 7 feet and just ticking the bottom. The rattle sound seems similar across all 4 pre-2006 baits. Three of the new bait sounded like the pre-2006 baits. One of the new baits seemed a bit fainter than the old ones. The tone of the rattles in all baits is similar. Molding ‘dents’ All of the old baits and 2 of the new baits have what appear to be small ‘dents’ where the plastic sagged into the body during the manufacturing process. The dents on the older baits were far more numerous and far more pronounced. Two of the new baits had no dents. One new bait had one very slight dent. The other new bait had two very slight dents. (Older baits) Pre-2006 - Black - has two dents on the belly in front of the hook hanger, a dent on the starboard side of the nose, and the starboard side of the tail. Pre-2006 – Metallic Perch - has two dents on the belly in front of the hanger, dents on the starboard side and port side of the nose, a dent on the starboard side of the tail, and a slight dent on the back near the top on the starboard side. This is the oldest bait in the group which I believe was made in the late 90s. Pre-2006 – Crystal Mudcraw - has two dents on the belly in front of the hanger, a dent on the starboard side of the nose, and a slight dent on the starboard side of the tail. Pre-2006 – Bluegill Perch (with orange sharpie on belly) - has one large dent on the starboard side of belly in front of the hanger. This dent is the largest and deepest by far. It looks like and inverted water drop. It also has dents on the starboard side and port side of the nose, a dent on the starboard side of the tail, and a slight dent on the back near the top on the starboard side. (Newer baits) Post-2006 – Blue chrome - has no body dents. Post-2006- Gun Metal Shad – has a very slight dent on the starboard side of the belly in front of the hanger and another very slight dent on the starboard side of the nose. Post-2006 – Breeding Bluegill - has no body dents. Post-2006- Mossback Craw – has a very slight dent on the starboard side of the belly. Because the few dents on the new baits appear in similar spots to where they occurred in the old baits seems to me that they are still made the same. Luhr Jensen must have figured out a way to mold the bodies with far fewer dents/sags. Clear coat On the 4 older baits, the clear coat is thin and uniform with no fish eyes. The clear coat on the newer baits is thicker. There are ‘fish eyes’ in the clear coat on two of the new baits so you can see that it is thicker than the old clear coat. Measuring the length and width of the body and thickness of the lip also indicate the clear coat is thicker on the new baits. The thicker clear coat may increase the durability of the new baits compared to the old ones that would not likely survive an errant cast into an object. This is not a complaint about these baits. I really like the bait. There are usually at least 5 in my tackle bag in different colors. They are very thin walled and were difficult to manufacture. The quality on the new baits has definitely improved. I have fished these baits for 20 years and have caught multiple species on them. The new ones and the old ones both are great fish catchers. The have a very tight wiggle that draws some vicious strikes. They are very stable and don’t blow out even on fast retrieves. The only disappointment I have in the new baits is they discontinued the Metallic Perch color - gold chrome perch pattern with the green chrome on the shoulders and orange on the belly. It doesn’t show well in the pics. It is a deadly bait in the Northeast as it looks like several of the local baitfish. INCHES Lip **** Pre / Post OUNCE Body Body Port Starboard 2006 Color Weight* Length** Width*** Thickness Thickness pre Black 0.334 2.6135 0.7210 0.0845 0.0845 pre Metallic Perch 0.322 2.6040 0.7185 0.0845 0.0845 pre Crystal Mud Craw 0.328 2.6210 0.7220 0.0840 0.0840 pre Bluegill Perch 0.340 2.6000 0.7205 0.0850 0.0850 AVG 0.331 2.60963 0.72050 0.08450 0.08450 post Blue Chrome 0.330 2.6460 0.7440 0.0970 0.0970 post Gun Metal Shad 0.363 2.6395 0.7450 0.0950 0.0955 post Breeding Bream 0.341 2.6395 0.7465 0.0955 0.0950 post Mossback Craw 0.358 2.6390 0.7445 0.0960 0.0955 AVG 0.348 2.64100 0.74500 0.09588 0.09575 Norman Speed N New Evoo 0.463 2.69800 0.82400 0.07300 0.73000 * Weight with no hardware. ** Length of body of plastic measured from above tail loop to noise point *** Body width just behind belly hanger **** Lip thickness on both sides as close as possible to center hump on the bottom side of the lip Norman Speed N vs. Lurh Jensen Speed Trap The Speed N is a new lure very similar to the Speed Trap. The Speed N is close in size to the Speed Trap with a similar action. The Speed N is also made of butyrate. The Speed Trap is available in more colors. The Speed Trap also has some bluegill colors and chrome colors which the Speed N does not. Hopefully, Norman will add more colors in the future. The Speed N is made in Guatemala. The Speed Trap is made in China. The Speed N dove to around 5’ on the same setup that the Speed Trap reached 7’. The Speed N is heavier and casts further than the Speed Trap. The Speed N I purchased had no defects. The Speed N had a tight wiggle very similar to the Speed Trap. They both have a similar lip design. Like the Trap, the N also did not blow out on a fast retrieve. I could feel the action of the Speed Trap a bit more on my rod tip. I guess I would describe the vibration of the Trap as just a bit crisper compared to the N. The Speed N did have a different rattle from the Trap. The Speed N makes more of a thud knock rattle. The Speed N has 2 chambers that run horizontally across the bottom of the bait that each house 1 fairly large ball. The balls have a limited range of motion, they can move and knock side-to-side. The Speed Trap has one medium ball in a horizontal chamber on the belly with very limited moment that provides a very subtle knock and a smaller ball free roaming in the open body that gives off a fairly high pitch rattle. I have only fished with the Speed N one time and caught no fish in 40 degree water so I can’t attest to its ability to catch fish. I have had years of success with the Speed Trap. It would be great to have a successful Speed Trap like lure that can hit shallower water. It will be interesting to see how the Speed N does next year. Neither lure performs well being dragged across 6 inches of ice. Jim
    5 points
  4. Update: I received my order yesterday. I assumed I would never get it and the money was gone. I wasn't too concerned about it, getting invaded by Russia is a valid excuse to not fulfill orders. I was very surprised when I found the box on my doorstep. I ran all 3 aluminum molds today and they shot perfect. I might place another order just to help the cause.
    4 points
  5. Here is a simple method for making some stencils I came up with I lay down a sheet of aluminum foil , sprayed with butter flavored Pam ( that was all I had , I suspect regular Pam would also work ) Drizzle hot glue randomly , about 10 " above work surface . If you want thick lines you can let the glue spread before cooling down or the thinner lines cool down quickly - I just blew air on them to set at what stage I wanted . Clean with soap and water . They are soft and pliable and can be clipped around lure like tulle or laid down as usual . I am going to try doing this method on blank square bill ( sprayed with butter Pam first ) to see if it will hold the shape once cooled down , more ideas will have to wait till next weekend
    4 points
  6. Yep there's not a thing wrong with Ozark Trail baits. Just like any other brand of baits they all have some good ones & they all have some that may not be as good as the next but all brands have some that will catch fish. We use to use a bait that actually got us made fun of by some guys saying we were crappie fishing. Well guess what after winning 1st & big fish the next 6 times straight they didn't make so much fun of us again. I really enjoyed when they asked what we caught them on & laughing when telling them & they thought i was lying to them. A shame it wasn't a big name brand or color anybody thought would catch fish.
    4 points
  7. The best wake I've ever fished was/is the CL8 baits Baby Possum. It has a wide, flat bottom, a mostly flat top and a reverse cut joint that is fairly tight. It's lip depth below the bait is about equal to the baits heighth and the lip is very close to the front of the bait. It sits pretty low in the water, with just the top 3/16 inch sticking out of the water. The waking version weighs right at 4 oz's but fishes extremely heavy, like it weighs 6 oz and can wear you out even with the right rod. It seems to be a small compact package that is very dense. I've had great luck with the fish just crushing the bait, especially around wood. My wake making experience has been primarily with resin baits. When making a 2 pc bait, I use the 60/40 guideline, 60 being the front section. 50/30/20 for a 3 pc bait, with a short tail. When I draw out a design, I always include a drawn in tail, This will help me judge the size the tail section will wind up being and the overall shape of the bait. I've made a couple the with even shorter tail section on a two pc and the tail section will slap pretty hard back and forth. Also take into account for the length of the joint cut itself. Cutting certain angle joints can have the effect of shortening the front section while lenghtening the second section, creating unbalanced proportions. You want the front section and the lip to drive the back section with it's movement, not have the back section hump the front. See a lot of new glides out there with a longer tail section than front, makes for a weird swim. I've made a couple myself. I use 1/8 Lexan/Poly for lips, never needed anything bigger, even on 10-12 inch wakes. I have a tablesaw blade that cuts a 1/8th inch kerf so the lips will slip right in the slot. When testing, I'll cut different shaped and length lips and wrap with blue painters tape around the inserted section to keep the test lip tight. In a wake I want a hard back and forth slap not a rolling type swim. Taller wakes don't make for great bait IMHO, I think they tend to roll more and that kills some of the tail action. Different if you have a rat type tail, they tend to create good action behind most style baits. Wakes can act dramatically different if the linetie is on the nose or under the nose towards the lip like a squarebill CB. I think a guy needs to try both positions to see how it affects your bait. AZsouth helped me troubleshoot a wake bait I was making. Made a bunch of adjustments. We moved the lipslot forward, the linetie back and I moved the joint spacing back and forth. We finally found right combination of those factors the bait came alive and had a great consistant swim. You just have to work to find the right combo for your particular bait. It was like the timing of the sections and the tail movements were finally right and moved in unison and made great sounds. That one looked like a Frankenbait but swam good. Make sure each section floats level with each other, independent of each other, so the joint{s} won't bind. *90 lip will help keep the bait waking and on the surface. Kick the lip out some and it will start to crank down. I make a couple resin wakes with no added weights in the bottom. Just some solid resin in the bottom and the hardware, MB mix up top. I would think that wood wakes will need some lead ballasting. This had been some of my experiences, hope it helps...
    4 points
  8. I learned a lot from screwing up building lures over the last 25+years. I didn’t have YouTube or much information it was just carve and see if it works There was a 10year period I built min 10 different lures a day and tested them in my personal pond. Most crude or completely odd looking lipless lures My point don’t just rely on available information only because it will limit your knowledge. If you have an idea try it experiment screw up and adjust.
    4 points
  9. Simple trick with lipless crankbaits move the weight up from the belly. The instability will give a wider shimmy. About 1/4 up from the belly often works well As for shape wider forehead wider wobble. Thinner will be faster and tighter Slope of the forehead plays a roll too best thing to do is make a few basic designs and test a few different things till you find what you like. Then make a nice one with paint and clear coat
    4 points
  10. You cannot. They're made with a different substance which does not melt with heat. All you'll get is burned rubber/plastic.
    4 points
  11. This is correct. Unfortunately, with mail order it's simply not possible for us to make much, if any, profit on orders below $15. We run a very streamlined business, but even small orders have to pass through at least 2 to 3 people before they're out the door. Larger organizations can afford to simply take the hit on small orders (or they haven't done the analysis to determine if it's profitable), but we're small (around 15 employees) and plan on staying that way, so we have to be more diligent on issues such as this. We recognize this is frustrating, but we do try to be upfront and honest about it. We're also always looking for ways to better serve all of you, so if we can identify a way to fulfill smaller orders without losing money on every one, we'll certainly make it an option. Matt Barlow
    4 points
  12. I too placed an order just prior to the invasion for a custom mold. Victor has been great to keep in communication with me. Pondered trying to do refund through PayPal due to the amount I spent but I figured the heck with it. I’ll either get it or I won’t. They have to much to worry about right now.
    4 points
  13. It could be an old Flatfish X5. The X stood for ‘Expert’. Helin got the patent for the Flatfish in 1936. It could also be a knockoff of the Flatfish as it was widely sold and copied through the years. I don’t think it is a Kwikfish which came after the Flatfish. The Kwikfish usually has traditional type hook arrangements. It does not appear to be Lazy Ike which is narrower than a Flatfish. It also does not appear to be a Brooks Reefer or a Beno lure. Your lure has the body length and weight of a Flatfish X5 which came out in 1947-8. It was available in wood or plastic. The hook setup on your lure is different from the typical X5 which had 3 trebles, a tail treble and two belly trebles mounted to the ends of a single wire spreader that had a loop in the middle that went through the belly hanger. Helin called that hardware setup - ‘gang hooks’. Some of the models could be ordered with two double hooks or gang single hooks. The older Fly Rod Flatfish models came with a single hook that could swing on a piece of wire imbedded in the center of the belly. Some of the bigger fly rod models had 2 single hooks mounted gang style. The biggest Fly rod model was the F7 which was 2-1/4” long. Your bait looks like an X5 but with a fly rod type hook set up. The line tie wire also looks like the line tie on some of the Fly Rod Flatfish models. Your lure looks like it was an attempt to use the X series to make a bigger model in the F series. From what I have read, Charlie Helin was concerned about increasing the chances of a hooking fish that did hit the lure. He created some unusual hook layouts and designs on baits to keep hooks facing away from each other or on opposite sides of the bait. I would not fish with it. It could be worth something. It could be one of Helin’s designs that was only available for a short time. Even if it is a knockoff, some of the older well made knockoffs can be worth something. helin hook assembly us2621438.pdf
    4 points
  14. This thread has been locked to prevent it from becoming a disaster
    4 points
  15. I use a metal coat hanger. I make an L but turn the bottom back towards the vertical part forming a second wire about an inch above the base. That gives me a bottom scrubber and a mixer just above the bottom. It fits in a gallon jug. An electric drill does the work.
    4 points
  16. Yep, the Deep Secret. Probably the deepest diving small body lure. Speed Trap body, trench digger lip. There's nothing wrong with casting it once you get past the lack of a weight transfer chamber, some helicoptering, and the lip causing the lure to sail off course in random directions on nearly every cast.
    4 points
  17. I would suggest moving your line tie a little higher on the nose and try that before changing lip location. Personally I think your lip needs to be moved forward some also. I've had to move a lip forward before to get a bait to wake better. I had to remove the old lip, fill the slot and cut a newer slot a fair amount forward. We called it the Frankenbait, as it had been cut apart and glued back together in various places, but it worked afterward. As Dave and JD above stated, try a shorter, wider lip. I've found those tend to get a taller profile bait like a gill, to wake better. The lip you're showing will want to make the bait dive or crank down, IMHO. Depending on how you have the bait ballasted, how low it floats in the water will also effect how it swims. Mine worked best as a very low float, barely floating with the back just out of the water, throws a great dual wake. The lip and nose create the big V wake and the tail will create swirling vortiscies{sp} to each side, inside the V wake. I would move the front hook hanger back a hair also, looks like the front treble will hang up on the lip when casting. That's a great looking bait, nice carving and paint, get er' waking and she will get crushed!! Here are a couple pics of a gill wake I made after moving all the components to get it to wake nice. This is a resin bait BTW, 6 inch long and just under 5 oz. Good luck moving forward with this bait and Happy Holidays to all!
    4 points
  18. I've not seen anything for spindle blanks. But there are plenty of CNC wood engravers that you could make half sides of crankbaits with to make mold masters. You could also probably make halves of any lure to though wire. I've contemplated this but never pulled the trigger and i just do low volume and like to carve lol.
    4 points
  19. I built this lathe to turn my cork handles, out of a $5.00 sewing machine motor, and $6.00 bushings.
    4 points
  20. You don't need to cure separate colors most of the time. I have one pattern, Table Rock Shad, that I have to cure the base coat first before adding the accent color. That pattern has a chartreuse body with a purple back and when I do the body and then add the purple and then cure it, where ever the purple touches the chartreuse it turns brown. So I paint the chartreuse and then cure and afterward I add the purple and then cure again with the purple and no problem. That is a rare case, most of the time the colors don't blend when curing. I use a hobby sandblaster to spray powder paint, it is like an air brush but you can't do fine detail. The good part is that you can blend colors and you can get good fading effects, watch my video on how I do this.
    4 points
  21. Never used it, but most slow cure epoxy products hold up over time and most fast cure get brittle and yellow over time. If it is fully cured in 30, I suspect it will yellow in about one year. If 30 minutes is the working time, it should be good.
    4 points
  22. There are a lot of good spinnerbaits out there right now. For me, a good spinnerbait should perform the duty it is meant to do. For example, if you have a spinnerbait mean for burning then it should do that well. That means it should be able to handle high speeds without rolling over or leaning heavily to one side. If it is a slow rolling model, then the blade should spin at very slow speeds without causing much lift. I should be able to crank that lure at least 10 times or more before having to pause slightly for the bait to get back down. An "all-purpose" type bait should be stable at moderate speeds and the blades should spin at relatively slow speeds. Good components, and doing its intended job is what makes a spinnerbait good. If it does all of those things and if used in the correct situation, a good spinnerbait will always catch fish.
    3 points
  23. This is what has worked for me. I wrap the joint hardware with 1/8-1/4 inch wide rubber bands, wrap it tight enough it'll pin the joint and the body segments won't move. Try and spread the bands out to cover while wrapping Some small paint/clear touch up may be needed if the rubber band covers any part of the bait body near the hardware. After it's dried/cured, just cut the bands with an exacto and dig out them out with forceps or tweezers. I'm spraying auto clear now, but have dipped 2 pc baits, half a bait at a time and put on a turner with decent results, 4 oz baits and under with the dipping. When dipping I kept the product off the hardware/bands as much as possible, even using a small brush to fill in tight spots. Hope this helps...
    3 points
  24. Probably, though I have yet to get flexible filament to work for me (yet), it's sort of like playing pool with a rope.
    3 points
  25. Hey now I have a use for a 3d print that fails and leaves me with a build plate full of noodles interesting idea regardless
    3 points
  26. Looks good so far! Keep it up. Don't be discouraged if you make a lure and it totally is a flop. We have all been there. Just give it a try, don't overthink your first lures. The tough part of a diving crankbait is getting the lip slot to be perpendicular to the wood so it dives true. I like to cut that slip slot while i have flat sides. You will have to kind eyeball where to put the lip. At this point I would take some 80 or 120 grit or so and sand it to the shape you like it. Maybe finish off with 220 or so. Then cut the lip slot/put wire in and weight (it will most likely need a bit of weight to give it a ballast). Once all the hardware is in, I would seal the wood one way or another. It helps keep any moisture out, but really it can help the overall appearance of your lure. There are tons of methods - polycrylic, polyurethane, superglue, epoxy are a few. Size and shape of the diving lip will be tricky to if you want to make a unique lure. Honestly, copy one of your favorites to start. It will give you a feel for how it works. Then you can start making the same kinda lure and try different size or shapes or angles, there are many options. You can learn a lot from the ones you fail at too! There is tons to talk about - keep asking questions.
    3 points
  27. However you are making your spinner baits, apparently they are working, based on the photos you attached. I wouldn't change anything. Fish them the way you make them. If it works don't fix it.
    3 points
  28. I wouldn't change a thing. If it catches fish you can't ask for anything else.
    3 points
  29. I cant speak to the VAC 50 stuff - but using other products like that lead me to believe it wasn't mixed properly and you introduced alot of air when mixing it - which resulted in a all the bubbles/cracks, etc etc With some of those products you need to follow the instructions diligently (mix volume) and time from mixing to pouring, etc... and even some you'll need to pull vacuum on it to get the air out before pouring it and even after would help. As for mold design - look at aluminum senko molds - there are alot of issues with your layout as far as spacing, sprue and venting sizes. Also - with any material besides aluminum - assume you'll want to put a little more space between each bait to aid in cooling. So your mold either needs to be bigger or you nee to put less cavities in it. J.
    3 points
  30. wood choices: most builders experiment to settle on the wood they want to use on their crankbaits. With experience, you realize producing a crankbait that performs well requires limiting the variables that can otherwise screw things up. One important variable is wood density and the workability of different wood species. It doesn’t matter which wood you decide is right for you. What matters is gaining experience using it. How to shape it, how to ballast it, how to finish it. Eventually you need to settle on a limited number of wood species because if you don’t, your baits will tend to disappoint you. At least that’s been my experience building baits for 20+ years.
    3 points
  31. I don't know if anyone here watches this on YouTube but it is a good show. I wanted to let you know that I'm going to be the guest Thursday, March 31 at 7pm CST. Classic and New Bass Jig Designs With Smalljaw! - YouTube
    3 points
  32. I would avoid China had an order and had to get my money back after 3 months of emails. I ordered from Amazon and had the same product in 3 days. Let's all stick to USA products I know it is hard too, but we must try I don't want to get political so I will stop at this point. Everything I pick up is almost all from China. I understand that this is the Delima this country is in, we just have to do are best I know it sometimes comes down to cost and we don't even know we are buying a product from China. Wayne
    3 points
  33. Wow! Lots of great feedback on here! @AZ Fisher, I feel like you just took me to school on this, and I am excited to put some of this stuff into practice. @Flaswimbaiter, I hate the feeling of painting one up and making look just great then having it not swim like it did previously. Nothing hurts quite like drilling into a nice paint job and clear coat to add or adjust some lead...
    3 points
  34. This gel is just on the outside of the bait. I think some of the additives used might be destroyed by the high heat of the plastisol.
    3 points
  35. You said you are curing the jig at 275 for 30 minutes, right? Are you using a toaster oven? If you are, is the 275 what you set on the dial or did you check the temp with an oven thermometer? If you are using a toaster oven and just set the dial at 275 that is probably your problem. Toaster ovens are notorious for being off......By a lot! I have my toaster oven set at 325 and the actual temp is 354, that is 29 degrees. So if your oven is off by say 25 degrees, it is only 300 but 30 minutes at that temp is probably too long.
    3 points
  36. And the answer is: THE ONE THAT WORKS FOR YOU. Webster's definition of clear coat: The endless search by fisherman for the ultimate coating for a fishing lure. Derived from clear coatus, Latin for waste a ridiculous amount of time and money looking for a product that doesn't exist. See tackleunderground searches for more information back to 820 BC lol
    3 points
  37. There is a post just a couple above yours that will show you all the sites but just to name a few, angling AI for molds, bait plastics for plastisol and some other stuff, janns netcraft, dead on plastic....
    3 points
  38. I store my plastic in a five gallon Igloo water cooler. Unscrew the lid and mix it then dispense what I need through the spigot. They make these coolers in smaller sizes as well. https://www.acehardware.com/departments/outdoor-living/coolers/hard-sided-coolers/84243?x429=true&msclkid=6e64983742881b4cc530fa26e5dccd59&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=PLAs_N4_Outdoor-Living_Coolers_All_Other&utm_term=4581527521796400&utm_content=Outdoor-Living_Coolers_All_Other&gclid=6e64983742881b4cc530fa26e5dccd59&gclsrc=3p.ds
    3 points
  39. If they're all the same, get a 5 gallon bucket with a lid, dump the liquid in, cut the gallon jugs and scrape out the hard pack. Put the hard pack in the 5 gallon bucket with the liquid and use a paint mixer on your drill.
    3 points
  40. Chris, you’re right that a line tie in the nose of a wood bait can be a weak point, especially in soft balsa. If you break the finish in the bait while tuning it will be a goner quickly. Rather than use a steel screw eye, many builders use hand twisted screw eyes made from soft temper stainless steel or brass, either of which is easy to bend to tune a bait. I use .041” soft temper stainless from McMaster-Carr online in standard sized bass baits. It’s easy to twist accurately and plenty tough enough to last well, and won’t break finish while tuning the bait.
    3 points
  41. I'm far from an 'expert' but have some anecdotal advice I'd like to give you: There's a fine balance between stability and instability in a glide and I think you did a great job showing this in your experiments. An 'unstable' lure will have a tendency to roll. This roll is also what causes the lure to have an 'S' swimming pattern when straight retrieved. Instability is increased the higher the center of gravity is. A ballast close to the center line will cause it to roll and the further away from the center line the more stable it will be. A stable lure will have no roll, and therefore no swimming action on a straight retrieve BUT will often have a really good gliding action when given a hard twitch. It's because this hard twitch/jerk forces a point of momentary instability, and when the lure stabilizes itself it then glides like a torpedo in a straight line either left or right. You need something that is stable enough to glide, but unstable enough that it has a small amount of belly roll. From your experiments, I think you found both "extremes." My advice would be to find something in the middle. Two things I would try: 1. Start with the most stable gliding bait, drill out your weight holes and add the weights. Test it. If it's a torpedo on the straight retrieve, remove the weights, drill the holes deeper (closer to the center line), put them back and test again. Keep doing this to see what happens. My thought is the closer the weights are to the center line, the more it will roll, but the less it will glide. 2. Start with the better swimming lure. Remove a small amount of weight from the largest ballast and take that little bit you removed and add it back to the bait so that it remains level when sinking. Test it. Keep doing this until you achieve a glide that's far enough with a bit of belly roll and you should be able to also have it swim on the straight retrieve. The last thing you could do would be to change the shape of your lure... This sounds like it would be the most difficult but it would be interesting to see what your lure looks like to get a better idea of what's happening.
    3 points
  42. We don’t need no stink’n badges!
    3 points
  43. You can use the search feature at the top right or under the ‘Activity’ button to look up clear coat posts. There are a lot of posts with lots of tips. Which ones have you tried already? I have used Devcon 2 Ton (D2T), Envirotex Lite (Etex), and Bob Smith Industries (BSI) and they all can work well. They all can also have issues if not used correctly. Avoid 5 minute epoxies for clear coats as they tend to yellow and can cure too quickly to level out. Look for ones with a 30 minute or longer working time. I mostly use D2T now because it is readily available where I am and it seems to be tolerant of environmental factors. Everybody has their own preference. I plan on trying Crystal Clear Epoxy from East Coast resins in the near future. Someday, I will get around to building a UV resin curing light box and try that. Your picture of craters is also called ‘fish eyes’. That term should help in your searches. As others have pointed out, the most common causes of this are surface contamination, missing spots when applying, and not using the clear coat properly. Surface contamination can occur from touching the bait with your fingers and leaving oils on the paint, the paint not being fully dry, or dust settling on the lure after painting. Try to not to touch the bait and use disposable gloves. You may want to try a spray mid-coat like Rustoleum 2X Clear Matte or Krylon Matte Clear if the problem continues. Do your sanding in another room or outside to avoid dust. Sweep or shop-vac when you have no painting or clear coating planned. Use a heat gun or hair dryer to set the paint and also to blow off any dust just before clear coating. You may want to let the paint dry overnight. It is also possible the sealer or paint you used is still off-gassing. Off-gassing usually produces blisters or areas where the clear coat and paint peel off, and not craters. Another problem could be that the paint itself does not allow good adhesion even when dry. Some metallic paints in particular can have this problem. This problem can be solved by spraying a clear mid-coat before the final clear coat. Missing spots or applying the epoxy too thin will create fish eyes. Your fish eyes appear along the back ridge of that lure. You may have missed that area with the epoxy or put it on too thin. On thicker epoxies, you could thin the epoxy with a couple of drops of denatured alcohol to make it easier to apply. Missing spots was a problem I had before I got a bright light to look over the bait closely. You need to get real close to the bait and may want to use a magnifying glass. Right after applying the clear coat, rotate the bait under a bright light to look for bare spots or uneven clear coat. Look at the glare from the light on the surface of the bait. Deviations or wavy-ness in the glare mean missing or thin epoxy. Pay particular attention to around the hook hangers, line tie, diving bill, any corners or ridges like a gill plate or fin ridge, any sharp curves like the back and belly of the lure. Look for areas that would block a clean brush stroke when applying the clear. You may be mixing the epoxy in too big of a batch, trying to do too many baits at once. The epoxy could be setting up while you are applying it. It does not have time to level out on the bait. You may have to do smaller batches. On my large baits, 7+ inches and 3+ oz., I do one bait at a time. Make sure you follow the instructions of the clear coat you are using. Mix the correct ratio. You may need a digital scale for this or disposable measuring cups. After using D2T for so long, I am able to eyeball this. Try mixing with a plastic stick as opposed to wood. I use disposable paint brushes to apply my clear. I cut off half of the plastic handle for use as a mixing stick. Don’t mix on a surface that can add contamination. Mix thoroughly. Find the temperature and humidity information for the clear coat on the package or their website. Most clear coats have a preferred temperature and humidity. You may need AC, heat, a humidifier, or dehumidifier if you are not close to the optimal temp and humidity. You may want to warm the bottles in a bowl of warm water before mixing if they are stored below the optimal temperature. Try to avoid clearing on rainy or high humidity days. If you are using a rotisserie to cure the baits, make sure the baits are not rocking as they rotate. This can happen with larger lures. You may need a 3rd point to secure the bait from the belly hanger to keep it from rocking. You want the bait to not move on the rotisserie as the rotisserie spins. Big baits have a tendency to flip on the rotisserie if only secured at the two ends. Rocking or flipping can prevent the epoxy for leveling out. I don’t know what clear coats you have available in Australia. There has to some that will work well if the instructions are followed carefully. It may seem like a pain to pay attention to the proper procedures. But once you get used to it, it becomes second nature. Below are some other posts on clear coats. Jim https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/37686-tacky-epoxy-check-your-temps/ https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/37532-new-guy-old-questions/ https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/12510-trying-to-achieve-a-flawless-finish/ https://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/36877-epoxy-issues-and-lure-turner-questions/?tab=comments#comment-301056
    3 points
  44. Good example of Vortex Shedding, bite was slow so took this video.
    3 points
  45. its kind of sad, dead on gets a great reputation from youtube, but if you watch the videos saying how clear it is, you cant even see the sides of a 1 cup pyrex, and it always has bubbles in it. i use bp and have been very happy with it, might try calhoun again but im happy with bp so no real reason to change. either way ill never try dead on after hearing what real bait makers have to say. youtube and some facebook fanboys sell a lot of dead on, not for me thats for sure!
    3 points
  46. Sometimes inaction is the trigger - like when a Muskie hits it on the pause. I have seen prey freeze when faced with a predator. Some fish attack a school, stunning or wounding prey. This might be another case where inaction triggers a strike.
    3 points
  47. Not sure what the expectations of this product were or are. Just to explain what it is from what I have recieved. It is hilite put on clear film and cut into glitter. An explosion of color is not what you get. But you can get a transparent bait with flashes of the color you choose. Clear and light smoke color will get you the highest quality affect. Putting it in an opaque color will not yield a result that is worth the effort to put it in.
    3 points
  48. Usually you can go up or down one size on a Do-It mold. If you need to go really big, take the hook place it in the mold, close the mold and lightly tap the mold with a hammer. This will give you an impression on the mold halves on where you need to cut. The you can use a Dremel as mentioned above or a hand file. The mold is alum. and soft, so go slow and steady.
    3 points
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