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  1. Never used it, but most slow cure epoxy products hold up over time and most fast cure get brittle and yellow over time. If it is fully cured in 30, I suspect it will yellow in about one year. If 30 minutes is the working time, it should be good.
    2 points
  2. Yes. Vortices always want to be vertical, there is a reason for this but I cannot remember. tornadoes are formed by a horizontal vortex switching to vertical. So, if you provide a square(ish) boot then the vortices will form on the sides. Be prepared to experiment and prototype more variations. Shoot video and study the swim in slow motion. If the tail flips/twists as in the Shafteez video then you may have to reverse the tail. The rounder body may give you problems, but good luck with it. Always best to change one feature at a time or you will not learn what works and what doesn't. Dave
    2 points
  3. I have been told the Speed Trap is made out Butyrate a.k.a. Cellulose Acetate Butyrate. I don't know if that has been changed. Butyrate is weaker than ABS of the same thickness. Butyrate is easier to mold into very thin-walled items like the Speed Trap. A lot of Speed Traps end up with small dents/dimples from the molding process. Take a look at the belly of your Speed Traps. I know some lure companies will use Butyrate for some models to get a different rattle sound than other lures. It produces more of a deep thud type sound. I am a fan of the Speed Trap too. It is a great lure. The Metallic Perch color is one on my favorites. Of course, they discontinued that color. I have one that I painted black that works great too. Mark, I know you have made your own version of the Speed Trap which looks great. I thought you might like to read the 'Tech Sheet'. Jim SpeedTrap tech sheet.pdf
    2 points
  4. That smell will go away pretty fast. The solvent portion is the worst and does go away in a day or so.
    2 points
  5. Softer plastic should help a lot.
    2 points
  6. LHL, great point about the Z bend on a wire through bait. I ran into that problem on the wire through baits and did a Z bend as well. I forgot about that until your post. The body on bass colored bait has a rivet set into the ends of the body to stop the Z bend from sliding into the bait. It looks like on some lure bodies I used cup washers and on others I used a rivet set into the wire through shaft hole. The first pic shows a closeup of my Z from the side. I had the Z bend drop down. I also made one wire through that ended in a loop at the tail end of bait (gold colored bait). Off that loop, I attached a second short piece of shaft wire by creating a loop through the loop at the end of the body. This will also stop the shaft wire sliding as the loop is the stop. I never really like the way the blade hangs down at rest once I saw it in the water. It looks unnatural to me. I saw some baits like this and decided to try it. It works. It just looks weird to me. I prefer the lures with one shaft wire with the Z bend.
    2 points
  7. JD has already provided a ton of good information but I'll throw my hat in the ring here since I just recently built a delta prop bait. Hopefully this picture can help explain some things. I went with a through wire construction so I started by carving the cedar blank and then drilling a hole straight through the bait. This presents it's own complications as the wire is free to slide back and forth which will pinch the blade in the back when retrieving the bait, stopping it from rotating. To counter this I added a bead in the back and then bent the wire in a 'Z' shape so that the bead presses against the body when the lure is retrieved but stops at the bend in the wire, leaving the rear blade freedom to spin. Check out Musky Madness Trophy Topper for better pictures of the bend. I didn't go with the cup washers or screw eye base eyelets but if I were to do it again I definitely would. The final note I'd make is I added a small amount of weight just behind the front hook hanger to act as a ballast to keep the body from rolling on the retrieve. I'll have to double check but from what I remember in my testing this bait sits pretty level, if not very slightly tail down. If it sits nose down then the front blade will dig and not throw any water which is the whole point! This is a more subtle top water but if you bend the blades up to almost 90 degress you'll get a lot better commotion out of it.
    2 points
  8. My first creeper did not work until I bent the rear end of the wing back less than they came. The wings were too open on the retrieve with a wobble so large that the whole bait would flip over. The good thing about a creeper is you can test the wings after you seal the bait with a small bent piece of shaft wire for a pin. From the prop lures I have made, my single rear prop lures are louder than my front and rear prop lures. Both can catch fish. And you can vary the retrieve on both. I think the front and rear prop bait works best when it sits flat in the water so both blades get enough water. I like a single rear prop lure to sit slightly tail down to prevent any nose diving and to make sure the prop gets a lot of water. If going with a rear prop only, the bait may sit tail down too much depending on the prop and rear hook weight. You may have to put a small ballast somewhere in front of the midpoint lengthwise to get it to sit only slightly tail down. The most commotion is a double rear prop with counter rotating blades. It looks like a blender in the water. The double rear props maybe too cause much commotion. I know peacock bass like them. I have only caught a single fish (pike) on that one. I would use a cup washer on the body ends. Cup washers give the body more durability from prop and hardware impact on casts and clear coat wear from the prop rotating constantly. On the front after the loop, I had a bead then the prop. After the prop blade, I had a bead and then a LPO disc washer free spinning on the shaft or screw. Then, a cup washer epoxied to the lure body. The disc washer is probably overkill but I want the bait to last. On the back, I had a cup washer epoxied to the body, a free spinning bead, the prop, a disc washer or bead, then a rivet. I used a rivet to give the prop a little more space from the rear hook attachment loop. Big baits have big hooks which can foul the rear prop especially on a slow retrieve. You can use surgical or shrink tubing to hold the hook straight out if the rivet doesn't prevent that. The beads and washers may seem like a bit much. I wanted to make sure cut floating grass and scum had the least chance of stopping the props. You don't even notice them due to the size of the bait you are making. Also, I had trouble getting props to spin on twisted wire screws. I made mine with the longer LPO .092 screws which have a smooth section near the screw eyes that props spin very easily on. I also have made a couple of wire-through prop baits and the props spin easily on shaft wire. Lastly, if making a prop bait shaped like a baitfish on its side, the fish will be viewing it from the bottom. I focused my painting efforts on the side the fish sees. Good luck. There is nothing quite like a topwater hit especially own your own bait.
    2 points
  9. I have heard crawler and creeper used interchangeably. You should check out Dieter's creeper. It is one of the best I have seen. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9H3hQGIWwAg&t=626s The wing mounting position is critical. The wings should be mounted just below the horizontal mid-line to catch water and just forward of the front-to-back midpoint for the best pivoting position. The wings should be long enough to reach just past the nose of the bait. Too long they could hit the line, too short and the wings may not open up. Fortunately, Dieter included some mid-construction still shots at 7:55 showing the mounting placement. I made my first creeper with LPO wings. I made my second with wings made from a small aluminum sheet i got at a big box hardware store. I bent the back end of my wings back to limit the frequency of the wobble. Dieter's uses a limiting arm on the wing mounting bracket to limit the wobble. By prop bait do you mean a single rear prop, a front and a rear prop, a double rear prop, or a globe lure type prop bait?
    2 points
  10. 2010 reducer, Transparent base, Airbrush restorer. Wicked: Det White, Det black, Det sepia, Det Moss green, Pearl gold, pearl silver Createx: Pearl blue, Pearl white, Iridescent Red, IR yellow, IR green, Transparent brite yellow, T Red oxide, T Dark Brown, Flo yellow, Flo Sunburst, Flo Violet, (flo white) Folkart: color shift red, green, and violet, titanium. The Wicked detail colors can be made transparent by adding T base and reducer. White then pearls make an excellent base. Transparent, iridescent, and Flo can be layered to achieve many colors. IR and color shift make excellent highlights. T bright yellow turns silver to gold. This list cuts out a lot of duplication, yet covers almost all your color wheel. Hope this helps.
    2 points
  11. Well forget it the flash will stick together so not a good idea. Well we live and learn! Wayne
    2 points
  12. If I need a vacuum chamber just to use Dead On, I think I'm gonna stick with Baitplastics. It's much clearer too, not to mention less expensive.
    2 points
  13. I do need a sprue extender for the 6" bait, but not really long I just use a 1/2" copper coupler and just enough pipe to bottom out in the sprue 1/8" or so more. I am not sure if that would work in the 5" bait since there are two cavities, it my have to be bigger. even mine should be 1/4-3/8" longer I still top up the sprue after shooting it, I should have it so I don't have to backtrack but I am too lazy to bother. I find the 1/4, 5/16 or 3/8 works for most of my fishing. But I did find a head on aliexpress that would be perfect. a line tie a dropper loop and a screw lock all in one unit. I have not ordered it yet so I can't really say if it is good enough.
    1 point
  14. Terry, I live here in the Mogadore, Ohio area at this web site you can order pin men's. click here > Magadore Bait and Tackle. They do work well. I am planning on stopping at the Mogadore Bait and Tackle store on the way home from work today to pick up 4 each # 8 pin min's ,orange, green chartreuse and white. I have at trip scheduled in Wisconsin for the end of May, 2022 that I am looking forward to. Going to bring these new pin min's with me. Chad
    1 point
  15. It works for me now Thanks Dave
    1 point
  16. Vodkaman, Could you repost the video or try sharing the link in PM’s? It seems to not be working for me. Great posts by the way, I appreciate you sharing the information. Tommy
    1 point
  17. I'm probably late to the discussion, however, I am chemical science instructor for HAZMAT teams. Plastisol is listed as a carcinogen when heated. Wearing the proper PPE is highly recommended. The off gassing is will cause respiratory issues, and as one post stated it is caustic when the eyes are exposed to the gasses. Plastisol has been found in homemade explosives. A color change that occurs while heating in a microwave is a sure sign of over heating. I don't feel comfortable working with something like this. I'm not saying that you shouldn't, but I am saying that you should be aware of the hazards of this chemical.
    1 point
  18. You’re welcome, Jig Man. Nice looking standup jig head. Years ago when I used to pour, I needed to modify spinnerbait mold on short notice and couldn’t remember what I had used to block the lead. It was a mold I borrowed so I couldn’t permanently alter it. I used either a skirt collar or a disc punched from a silicone cooking mat. I may have used both ways at some point. I’m glad the skirt collar worked. I made some spinnerbaits without a molded skirt collar to mate a paddle tail swimbait or craw directly to the spinnerbait head with a bent wire type bait keeper. The bait had no skirt. I made a ½ and 3/4 ounce model with a single Colorado blade. It is like an upsized Beetle Spin for bass. Just cut the tip off the head of a soft plastic bait flat and put it on the spinnerbait with a drop of gel superglue. It works great for re-using damaged soft plastic baits. If I had enough time to make a big batch, I would use RTV on the mold. I wanted to make my own mold for that bait and incorporate a corkscrew into it. But, I never got around to it.
    1 point
  19. Sure, a lot of guys still making wood lures just most on this site don't post pictures or discuss it unless an issue is encountered. One reaches a level that issues become less and less and more importantly the ability to fix those issues becomes second nature.
    1 point
  20. its kind of sad, dead on gets a great reputation from youtube, but if you watch the videos saying how clear it is, you cant even see the sides of a 1 cup pyrex, and it always has bubbles in it. i use bp and have been very happy with it, might try calhoun again but im happy with bp so no real reason to change. either way ill never try dead on after hearing what real bait makers have to say. youtube and some facebook fanboys sell a lot of dead on, not for me thats for sure!
    1 point
  21. Jig Man, if you are doing a lot of jigs, put some red RTV silicone on both mold halves just under the head. Smooth out the silicone flush with the mold halves, and stick one of your hooks in the cavity on one half. Let RTV cure. When cured, slowly take hook out of mold and peel away carefully from RTV. Next take a razor blade and skin off any excess RTV on the mold halves. You're now ready to pour. If you ever want to use the lead keeper again, peel off all the RTV.
    1 point
  22. Sometimes I just pour without the blocker and cut the lead off later.
    1 point
  23. Yes this design has caught pike, musky, and large mouth. Personally I have only caught pike but that is the target species in my area I have made about 40 of them that have found there way to a few provinces in Canada
    1 point
  24. JD, Do you know what plastic was used in the original Speed Traps? We used to call them egg shells, because they were so delicate, but they caught fish.
    1 point
  25. Agreed! I learned a lot about wood and carving using this method. It's also important to note that "free" doesn't always mean "trash." I've gotten free redwood, mahogany, basswood, and plenty of other quality pieces. Keep your eyes open and you never know what you'll find.
    1 point
  26. thanks to all how took the time to reply!
    1 point
  27. I have painted some nickel blades as basskat suggested- rough up with steel wool or scotch brite, wipe clean, paint, and clear with Rustoleum 2x Clear. Both the paint and clear were rattlecan. When using the Rustoleum 2x, I do a couple of light coats to keep it thin and avoid drips at the blade tips. That paint and clear have lasted fairly long so far. You can also use finger nail polish and Sally Hansen Hard as Nails as a clear. Some of the glitter nail polishes look good on a nickel blade. When I paint blades, I usually do batches of 5-10. It really isn't much effort. The only pain is drying time for the paint and clear which really isn't that bad. In most lure making endeavors, there is going to be wait time. I usually only paint blades for custom patterns or a color I can't purchase. If you are looking to make a custom paint job on a blade an easy method is to use the cheap painted LPO blades. These blades are the 'H' series and are cheaper than both the premium and regal series. These blades are painted a matte base coat without a clear. Basically, the prep work including base coat have been done for you. You can use tape or stencils to come up with most anything. Just wipe any dust off and you're ready to paint. I have used the white blades a lot as they make a good base coat for just about anything like rainbow trout blades, red white stripe blades, and slate blue blades. I use the chartreuse blades to make firetiger blades, chartreuse red diamond blades, and mustard colored blades. I have added yellow dots to the orange blades and black blades for pike. https://www.lurepartsonline.com/Painted-Willow-Blades?quantity=1&custcol_blade_spoon_size=52 https://www.lurepartsonline.com/Painted-Colorado-Blades https://www.lurepartsonline.com/Colorado-Deep-Cup-Blades https://www.lurepartsonline.com/Painted-Indiana-Blades
    1 point
  28. If this is the new Victory 6317, our understanding is there most likely won't be more available until November.
    1 point
  29. Has been my experience also. Keep trimming the tail and maybe thin the area from the main body to the tail. Typically if too thick it starts to create too much drag and will cause a bait to start to roll on the few I made initially. Good thing about soft plastics easy to trim and change shape. A lighter can be used to thin the tail section on the water and let the melted plastic drip back on the tail paddle.
    1 point
  30. another thing you might consider is you can isolate the paddle from the body to some extent with segmentation like the yamamoto zako. its very popular as a vibrating jig trailer as is doesnt mess up the vibration and yet still has tail kick.
    1 point
  31. AGAIN YOU SHOULD WALK BEFORE YOU RUN, different blades require different spacing to allow flow without disrupting the other blades flow....I am not saying it can't be done but you need to build some regular blades that actually work before you take on more complex spinners. I would suggest that you use the search tab above and see the different path and angle that each blade uses. Just because someone else made it work does not insure that you can right out of the gate.
    1 point
  32. Not much of a computer guy but if you search surface paddler on the forum it should show
    1 point
  33. I would try bending the loops yourself. I mostly use round nose pliers, needle nose pliers, and vice grips for wire work. My round nose pliers have a stepped jaw. I also use a bench vise to hold nails and bits of metal rod to make bends around those on heavier wire. You get good at it real quick. Unless you plan on making a lot, I don't know if a wire former is worth it. I buy my shaft wires with a loop on one end. I build my spinners from the bottom up. At the line tie end, I bend the loop with the tools above. I sometimes use a Shyster type line tie loop. I sometimes put a swivel on the line tie loop of larger spinners. I am not sure if a wire forming tool can do those easily. I attach the hook by split ring on the loop that came on the shaft. I have made around 100 spinners over the past few years as I got into species other than bass. At most, I made maybe 25 a year which is not a lot. If I had to break it down, I probably have 40 for trout (sizes 1 to 3), 30 for bass and pike (sizes 4 - 6), another 20 or so in the size 4-6 range with hooks for soft plastic trailers, and around a dozen .051 wire musky bucktail type spinners. Now that I have a supply built up, I make only a couple a year to try something new or re-shaft a mangled spinner. At one point, I had a wire former from Twist-tech (which was good). It only did small wires so I didn't use it much. You had to buy an extra kit to do .040 wire which I like on size 5 spinners because I fish in pike waters. You also needed another larger wire former to do .045 and .051 wire. Because I have to use from .025 all the way to .051 wires, I would rather spend the money on blades and other components. A screw-up only costs you a wire shaft. You can buy a lot of shafts with that money. Once you start making them, wire bending becomes easy and you rarely screw-up. Side note: For wire twist eyes on hardbaits, I bought these pliers. I paid $10. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082SX8D4G/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 The 9" pliers work fine. You just need to use a glove because the knurling on the knob is harsh when new. Took a couple of tries to get good at it by twisting the wire around a nail in a vise. Well worth the $10. Don't waste your time on the 6", too flimsy.
    1 point
  34. Some of those body weights do seem low for the bait weight on the right. When using the chart, you have to add up all the components, the body weight, plus the head weight (the small body piece in front of the main body piece, sometimes there are 2 of these), solid beads, clevis, and blade will get you to the total bait weight. I think the bait weight also includes the weight of the undressed treble hook. The things I use most from the chart are the bait weight and blade size. The chart is just a suggestion and you can vary all of it to some degree. I don't often use the numbered bodies on the chart. I am too cheap to buy all the body types and different solid beads. I use various size hollow beads and just have a one bag of small solid beads. I usually use a sinker or generic body I have laying around. In the winter, I like to walk the ice and pluck lures from trees with a telescopic pole, usually the bodies can be re-used even if the rest of the bait is destroyed. You can buy weights cheaper and paint them with nail polish, clear with Sally Hansen Hard as Nails or thinned epoxy. I use a hollow bead (or 2) in front of the sinker/body. In front of the hollow bead, I like to use a small solid bead for the clevis to spin on. I have no real weight except the blade and body. I weigh my components on a small precision digital scale I got off Amazon. You can weigh all of the components including blade and shaft before assembly. You can compare your components' weight to the bait weight column to get a blade size similar to a Mepps. The bait weight column in the chart matches the Mepps Aglia weights. https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/mepps-aglia-original-plain-spinner Aglia Mepps 0 1/12 oz Mepps 1 1/8 oz Mepps 2 1/6 oz Mepps 3 1/4 oz Mepps 4 1/3 oz Mepps 5 1/2 oz With a body weight of 3/8 oz, you will be looking at a bait around a 1/2 oz the way I make them, probably a bit over 1/2 oz. Then, I look at the 1/2 oz bait weight line on the chart and find the blade size of #5. I usually go with the chart's hooks size for trebles (size 2 treble for a #5 bait). That bait if built will run just a bit deeper than a Mepps 5 Aglia. File that body down a bit and you could get the bait weight even closer to a 1/2 oz and be really close to the Mepps running depth if you want as close to exact as possible. The key thing to look at when building a spinner is the blade size compared to the total bait weight. Each blade size will have a range of bait weights it will work with. You can downsize a French blade for a given bait weight to make it run deeper. You could use a size 4 blade with that 3/8 oz body for a deeper running spinner. Too much weight vs. blade and the bait could retrieve too vertically and not spin well. You can upsize the blade to make it run shallower. If you upsize the blade too much, the bait could surface or just retrieve without spinning like a sled. Trailers like grubs and paddletails will also give some lift and add even more variables. You do have to experiment. Fortunately, shafts are cheap. If I am fishing a shallow river for bass/pike with major snag hazards, I might try a 1/4 oz body on a spinner with a #5 blade to keep it high in the water column. Conversely, I have a couple of spinners made with a 1 oz body and size 5 blade for deep water in reservoirs. There is no set formula. The blade size to bait weight depends on the specific fishing style you are trying to achieve. This also works in combination with retrieve speed. Faster retrieve, more rotation = more lift/shallower. Slow retrieve, less rotation = less lift/deeper. A scale and keeping notes on the exact size and weights of the components help a lot when you find combos you like. This prior post has some more info. http://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/37973-inline-blade-thickness/ I hope this helps.
    1 point
  35. Have you got a pic of one made up . When you cast it do you just start reeling when it hits the water? Because if you do a lot of in lines don't get going by doing that . As it sinks pop the rod tip . This causes the blade to move farther from the shaft. Then real quickly . You should feel resistance as the blade spins. After that you can slow your retrieve to the desired speed and the blade should continue to spin.
    1 point
  36. Yes it is, and very effective, and also getting hard to find. I'm trying to make 7" ribbon tail worms, and have come close. And I've been making Senko types in the close color with guys constantly asking me for more as it seems they're highly successful on smallmouth bass. Thanks guys. So I have the baby bass, but now need root beer, light pumpkin and Carolina pumpkin. And the light root beer. Of course the only colors I don't have! And of course they have to be from different suppliers. Oh well this addiction keeps off the street and out of trouble
    1 point
  37. Try MF baby bass for the green and Spikeits root beer for the brown. For a more fleshy brown color use Spikeits Carolina pumpkin, use a lot of it cause it is week.
    1 point
  38. Like Sonny said, Createx makes a "transparent base". It is actually a pigment free paint, so it is 100% compatible. It appears milky white in the bottle but dries crystal clear. This can be added to opaque (or any other Createx paint) to make it more transparent. It does not thin the paint, so viscosity is not affected. Use a reducer with the mixture for the right consistency. It is cheap and has many other uses. I also use it over foiled baits or epoxy to make a nice base for paint to stick to.
    1 point
  39. There is a razor saw / miter box combination specially made for Balsa and basswood. It is fast and clean, and I like working from a square cut.
    1 point
  40. W lure has a similar blank available in smaller quantities (WM600). I am not crazy about the insert style lure blanks. But they do swim well.
    1 point
  41. Any paint with a pearl, metallic or color-shift pigment has a greater chance of clogging. I reduce mine quite a bit an spray it at low pressure. You really don't need a lot of it to make a big difference - at least the way I use it. The size of the powder pigment may not be fine enough in that brand. I have had no problems with the folkart. Pearls tend to clump sooner than other paints (like transparent, opaque, detail). Don't thin your paints in advance then store them - esp pearls. They do weird thing in the bottle. One thing you may try is a little retarder mixed in with the paint.
    1 point
  42. I have a good idea what you are thinking and if it’s what I am thinking you would need a relatively thick lip compared to lexan/metal I bet most of my lipped pike lures would be comparable to what you use for Murray cod. I actually built a surface paddle based off the ones you Aussies use and have had decent results for pike here in Canada Check out the believer made by drifter tackle company or the platypus made by westin lures. These will give you an idea on an alternative option to bibs that could easily be done with resin. Maybe a modified version of what you are thinking could be possible by adapting the principles of these lures
    1 point
  43. With small lures, members discovered that very thin fiber/circuit board lips were more effective than thicker Lexan lips in creating waggle action. The thinner the lip, the better the action. The reason for this has not been discussed much, if at all. It is all about the sharp edge. Water can flow around a round object with minimum 'peeling off' of the flow, thus minimum disturbance of the water. Conversely, flow cannot negotiate a sharp corner; it cannot change direction that quickly. This causes a low pressure area behind the edge of the lip. Water gets sucked back into this low pressure area and thus the vortex is born. At very slow speeds, the shape of the water flow is symmetrical, the same both sides of the lure. But, as the lure speed increases, a certain speed is reached were the vortices start to interact. There is not enough room for the vortices to exist independently so they take turns. The vortices start to alternate, forming one side then the other. This effect is called ‘vortex shedding’, a ‘vortex street’ or ‘Kármán vortex street’. This alternating vortex is the engine that drives the lure, causing the desirable ‘waggle’ or action of the lure. This also explains why a lure has a minimum speed before the action starts. The sharper the edge is, the stronger the low pressure area, the stronger the vortex and therefore the stronger the action. Larger lures in the range of 8” and larger will require a thicker lip in order to survive bouncing off rocks with all that body weight behind. But the thicker lip is not going to produce as much action as the knife edge lip of the 3” lure. The solution is to cut a chamfer behind the lip face. This reintroduces the knife edge and improves the vortex strength and thus the action. Another way to improve action is to make the face of the lip concave. This causes pressure to build up in front of the lip which further increases the strength of the vortex. Here is a video that shows vortex shedding, and the start transition explaining the minimum speed. Dave
    1 point
  44. Good advice Dave I think I mentioned in this thread or some other about using a system wear I used different lexan tails. I did that with my old paddle tail lures. Nothing fancy just two small eye screws is how I secured them for testing
    1 point
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