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  1. Never used it, but most slow cure epoxy products hold up over time and most fast cure get brittle and yellow over time. If it is fully cured in 30, I suspect it will yellow in about one year. If 30 minutes is the working time, it should be good.
    2 points
  2. Yes. Vortices always want to be vertical, there is a reason for this but I cannot remember. tornadoes are formed by a horizontal vortex switching to vertical. So, if you provide a square(ish) boot then the vortices will form on the sides. Be prepared to experiment and prototype more variations. Shoot video and study the swim in slow motion. If the tail flips/twists as in the Shafteez video then you may have to reverse the tail. The rounder body may give you problems, but good luck with it. Always best to change one feature at a time or you will not learn what works and what doesn't. Dave
    2 points
  3. This is a 6" crappie swimbait made entirely of natural wood. There is zero painting on this bait. Every detail was inlaid with a scroll saw. It is made from five different kinds of wood: maple for the belly, pine for the yellow of the upper back, green poplar for the back, walnut for the head and tail, and ebony for the black spots. I had to do everything twice to make two sides, and I joined the two sides with a center core of maple and poplar.
    1 point
  4. 1 point
  5. I have not seen epoxy melt glitter. I have made baits out of wood, pvc, lead, brass and have used a few different epoxies. I have also used glitter nail polish with a top coat of epoxy and that worked. I don't have much experience with vinyl paint. I have only used it on small crappie jigs with no glitter. I have seen some vinyl jigs get gummy but I don't clear coat those tiny jigs. Once, I did foil an old 4" diamond jig. The jig had to be either Bead or Marathon. I remember doing each side individually and trimming with a razor knife. I think I used D2T as a top coat on that. It lasted a few years and then water started getting under the foil from dings on the edges of the jig. The foil is still on the jig but has been discolored in spots on the edges by the water. You could also try one of the foil Jig Skins. I have a few lures with a foil herring on them. One is a 6" bar/slab type jig. It still looks good after 2 years and maybe a dozen fish. It is coated with D2T.
    1 point
  6. I do need a sprue extender for the 6" bait, but not really long I just use a 1/2" copper coupler and just enough pipe to bottom out in the sprue 1/8" or so more. I am not sure if that would work in the 5" bait since there are two cavities, it my have to be bigger. even mine should be 1/4-3/8" longer I still top up the sprue after shooting it, I should have it so I don't have to backtrack but I am too lazy to bother. I find the 1/4, 5/16 or 3/8 works for most of my fishing. But I did find a head on aliexpress that would be perfect. a line tie a dropper loop and a screw lock all in one unit. I have not ordered it yet so I can't really say if it is good enough.
    1 point
  7. Terry, I live here in the Mogadore, Ohio area at this web site you can order pin men's. click here > Magadore Bait and Tackle. They do work well. I am planning on stopping at the Mogadore Bait and Tackle store on the way home from work today to pick up 4 each # 8 pin min's ,orange, green chartreuse and white. I have at trip scheduled in Wisconsin for the end of May, 2022 that I am looking forward to. Going to bring these new pin min's with me. Chad
    1 point
  8. Definitely looks like a boat hull. I have always had this image in my mind that Luhr Jensen had an aerodynamic wind tunnel and used it to come up with the body design. I have wondered if the small notch line on the back actually did something or if it is was just to catch fisherman by making the lure look less plain. After Rapala bought Luhr Jensen in 2006, Rapala moved the production to China and then to Indonesia. My Speed Traps are from before 2006. They have Made in the USA in the package and the old Oregon address. I am going to pick up some of the new ones to compare.
    1 point
  9. It works for me now Thanks Dave
    1 point
  10. Can you try it now and let me know if it works. YouTube have made changes and messed up the permissions. Dave
    1 point
  11. Vodkaman, Could you repost the video or try sharing the link in PM’s? It seems to not be working for me. Great posts by the way, I appreciate you sharing the information. Tommy
    1 point
  12. Most of the purple swirls that I see are a shade of green pumpkin with violet or purple hi-lite. So much easier than trying to get that swirl effect.
    1 point
  13. PPE is great but is always the last line of defense.. engineering controls are first and foremost. Vent with proper CFM and enjoy.
    1 point
  14. I would guess the best way to do a crab replica would be in soft plastics. Then just make an appropriate weighted jig that would hook into that.
    1 point
  15. I think the first cranks I painted were somewhere around 1995. My use of the internet was absolutely zero at that point. Just get to spraying....
    1 point
  16. I'm probably late to the discussion, however, I am chemical science instructor for HAZMAT teams. Plastisol is listed as a carcinogen when heated. Wearing the proper PPE is highly recommended. The off gassing is will cause respiratory issues, and as one post stated it is caustic when the eyes are exposed to the gasses. Plastisol has been found in homemade explosives. A color change that occurs while heating in a microwave is a sure sign of over heating. I don't feel comfortable working with something like this. I'm not saying that you shouldn't, but I am saying that you should be aware of the hazards of this chemical.
    1 point
  17. The wLure blank UPM515 is the closest I have seen to the size 5 Smash Shad. It might be an option for you as most of the blanks seem to be the size 7. The blank is between the size 5 and the size 6 Smash Shad. The Smash Shad size 6 is 2 and ½”. The blank is a 2 and 1/3” long. wLure has a video of the action. https://www.wlure.com/collections/blank-minnow/products/fishing-lures-blank-minnow-upm515?variant=16898554438 It’s on Amazon as well https://www.amazon.com/wLure-Unpainted-Jerkbait-Floating-UPM515P10/dp/B00QZPAH34/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=wlure+upm515&qid=1631586915&sr=8-1
    1 point
  18. Sure, a lot of guys still making wood lures just most on this site don't post pictures or discuss it unless an issue is encountered. One reaches a level that issues become less and less and more importantly the ability to fix those issues becomes second nature.
    1 point
  19. Jig Man, if you are doing a lot of jigs, put some red RTV silicone on both mold halves just under the head. Smooth out the silicone flush with the mold halves, and stick one of your hooks in the cavity on one half. Let RTV cure. When cured, slowly take hook out of mold and peel away carefully from RTV. Next take a razor blade and skin off any excess RTV on the mold halves. You're now ready to pour. If you ever want to use the lead keeper again, peel off all the RTV.
    1 point
  20. Just throwing out some ideas. How about using a silicone skirt collar, a disc punched from a silicone cooking mat, or high temp RTV to block around the hook? Maybe you could use some mold-making material to make a bunch of discs/cylinders with notches in them to fit around the hook.
    1 point
  21. Sometimes I just pour without the blocker and cut the lead off later.
    1 point
  22. Needs to get a thermometer , to see what temps it is getting to. then get back with us. Also contact Plastisol maker for recommendations on temp limits.
    1 point
  23. Yes this design has caught pike, musky, and large mouth. Personally I have only caught pike but that is the target species in my area I have made about 40 of them that have found there way to a few provinces in Canada
    1 point
  24. I have been told the Speed Trap is made out Butyrate a.k.a. Cellulose Acetate Butyrate. I don't know if that has been changed. Butyrate is weaker than ABS of the same thickness. Butyrate is easier to mold into very thin-walled items like the Speed Trap. A lot of Speed Traps end up with small dents/dimples from the molding process. Take a look at the belly of your Speed Traps. I know some lure companies will use Butyrate for some models to get a different rattle sound than other lures. It produces more of a deep thud type sound. I am a fan of the Speed Trap too. It is a great lure. The Metallic Perch color is one on my favorites. Of course, they discontinued that color. I have one that I painted black that works great too. Mark, I know you have made your own version of the Speed Trap which looks great. I thought you might like to read the 'Tech Sheet'. Jim SpeedTrap tech sheet.pdf
    1 point
  25. With small lures, members discovered that very thin fiber/circuit board lips were more effective than thicker Lexan lips in creating waggle action. The thinner the lip, the better the action. The reason for this has not been discussed much, if at all. It is all about the sharp edge. Water can flow around a round object with minimum 'peeling off' of the flow, thus minimum disturbance of the water. Conversely, flow cannot negotiate a sharp corner; it cannot change direction that quickly. This causes a low pressure area behind the edge of the lip. Water gets sucked back into this low pressure area and thus the vortex is born. At very slow speeds, the shape of the water flow is symmetrical, the same both sides of the lure. But, as the lure speed increases, a certain speed is reached were the vortices start to interact. There is not enough room for the vortices to exist independently so they take turns. The vortices start to alternate, forming one side then the other. This effect is called ‘vortex shedding’, a ‘vortex street’ or ‘Kármán vortex street’. This alternating vortex is the engine that drives the lure, causing the desirable ‘waggle’ or action of the lure. This also explains why a lure has a minimum speed before the action starts. The sharper the edge is, the stronger the low pressure area, the stronger the vortex and therefore the stronger the action. Larger lures in the range of 8” and larger will require a thicker lip in order to survive bouncing off rocks with all that body weight behind. But the thicker lip is not going to produce as much action as the knife edge lip of the 3” lure. The solution is to cut a chamfer behind the lip face. This reintroduces the knife edge and improves the vortex strength and thus the action. Another way to improve action is to make the face of the lip concave. This causes pressure to build up in front of the lip which further increases the strength of the vortex. Here is a video that shows vortex shedding, and the start transition explaining the minimum speed. Dave
    1 point
  26. As I understand the subject, the lateral line is the fish's ears, a row of sensitive pressure sensors along each side of the fish's body. Just like with our hearing were not only can we hear sounds, but with an ear on each side of our head, we can tell roughly where the sound is coming from. When a fish moves through the water, it is pushing and pulling at the water making pressure changes, just like when you shout, you set up pressure changes or waves in the air. those changes in pressure travel away from the source, gradually getting weaker until they dissolve away to nothing. it is the same in water except it is movement rather than sound. The vortex disturbance that our lure sends out create an image of something moving rhythmically through the water. An inanimate object would not send out such a sound wave, thus creating an image of something alive and possibly edible. Of course, the image may be the equivalent of a Keystone Cops video, but real enough to warrant further investigation. I hope this helps. Dave
    1 point
  27. I have posted this complex sinusoidal idea many times, in the last post of comments page 2 for example. I have even drawn the graphs on post No19 of this link. I might have posted some 14 years ago when I first thought of the idea and experimented with it, but may have kept it to myself at that time. I am very impressed that you arrived at the graphs independently, good engineering mind. Simple harmonic motion is always on an architect’s mind when designing tall thin structures or long bridges. There have been famous disasters due to combinations of SHM and vortex shedding. I do think that the double sinusoidal action has a chance of an explanation for your tail-spin lure, but not the Bass-Oreno, that is more likely caused by my definition of hunting, the lip passing 90° on the retrieve. On the tail-spin, the two actions are quite separated. Here is a video of a lure that I was experimenting with called ‘Big Ed’. It is a soft bait with a bulbous nose and a tail boot. The large sinusoidal motion is too slow to be assigned regular vortex shedding and so I am inclined to think that a complex sinusoidal action is going on. See what you think. Dave
    1 point
  28. If I need a vacuum chamber just to use Dead On, I think I'm gonna stick with Baitplastics. It's much clearer too, not to mention less expensive.
    1 point
  29. Thank you for sharing the great idea, Dave. I'd like to add a small one to yours. First, thin circuit board lips are more flexible than the thick lexan lips. So, when we retrieve a crankbait, the thin circuit board lip is twisted to one side (right or left) by the pressure of the water. Then the twist of the lip turns back to the original state, and ths moves the crankbait waggle faster. This process will occur continuously every times the crankbait swim to one side (right or left). Sorry for my long absence and poor English.
    1 point
  30. Tried many types of blank coatings. PermaGloss, IMO, by far the thinnest and most durable.
    1 point
  31. The software that I think that you are talking about is called 'computational fluid dynamics' or CFD. It will give a graphic representation of how the water will flow around a fixed object. The computations are massive and complex. Last time I checked, it takes many hours to achieve the result. It could be used to show the flow around a lure, but it will not show how the lure will move. Also the software is very expensive and very complex to use. The success or failure of a lure is a fine balance of lip (size and shape), ballast (hooks and weight), and most of all tow eye position. I list the tow eye position as the most significant adjustment, because the water flow around the body will be consistant given a particular body shape, lip shape and ballast, but tweak the tow eye position and the action changes dramatically. CFD software, as far as I am aware, only deals with shapes, it does not take into account weight distribution, buoyancy or movement. The best tool that you have available for determining whether a lure will swim or not, and as an engineer who likes to calculate things it really pains me to say this, is experience. Build your prototypes, fit the hooks and top coat (very important) and swim it. Then make one change at a time and keep notes. Dave
    1 point
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