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smalljaw

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Everything posted by smalljaw

  1. JD_mudbug told you where to buy skirt tabs from as there really is no "best place" to get them. As for your situation wanting to get better with a jig and the waters you fish, I can help with that. The first thing with fishing a jig in clear water with a lot of pressure is the kind of jig you are going to use. Using a standard type bass jig with 50 or 60 strands of skirt material isn't going to result in a lot of bites, in fact you'll take home a skunk more often than not. Look to make a downsized jig, 1/8oz to 5/16oz is the range you want to go with most of the time and 1/4oz will be like the best all purpose size. That isn't to say a larger full size jig isn't going to work, clear water isn't ideal for large jigs and add in high pressure and it practically eliminates a big jig. Skirts are going to be around 40 strands, that gives good movement with just a little bulk, you want to keep these jigs on the smaller, more compact size. Bluegill colors are good but don't use a lot of bright colors, keep it on the natural side. A good bluegill pattern in a 1/4oz jig would be 30 strands of watermelon blue magic craw Dalmatian, 5 strands of blue shad Dalmatian, and 5 strands of perch belly. That color pattern does well in my clear water fisheries and most of the places I fish get a lot of pressure. A good craw pattern would be 25 strands of green pumpkin, 10 strands of brown, and 5 strands of natures edge orange. Now if you find the fish are really active and you are catching fish, that is when you may want to try the larger jigs with a full 50 or 60 strand skirt. Good luck with getting better with your jig tying and fishing.
  2. The wire is too large for the size of the spinner as was noted but the body is too wide for the length of the spinner. What is happening is that the body is disrupting the water flow behind the spinner blade. You need to add about 3/8" in length and then a few more beads behind the clevis. That should allow the water to go by the blade well enough to carry the blade completely around the wire. If you want to have it be compact try using a smaller body and smaller wire or even jump up to a #2 blade.
  3. Welcome to TU. You are looking for a unicorn that most of us searched for at one time or another. I tried a lot, and I mean a lot of ball bearing swivels over the years. What I found was there are two brands that are great and the rest not so much. Worth ball bearing swivels and Sampo, the Sampo are the most expensive but you can get the Worth for half that, even less if you order in bulk. If you aren't going to use one of those options then you may want to try roller swivels. They are a step below the ball bearing swivel but way better than crane and barrel swivels. The best part is you can get good roller swivels at a decent price and they will perform better than cheap ball bearing swivels. Get these in a size #10 - Bulk Roller Swivels - Nickel Plated Sizes 14, 12, 10, 7 - Barlow's Tackle (barlowstackle.com) Then buy the size #2 standard split ring and you'll be set. The roller swivel in a size #10 is less than $5 for a 50 pack and a 100 pack of split rings will cost you $6. So you'll have 50 good swivels for $11 and they will perform better than cheap ball bearing swivels. Cheap ball bearing swivels have a tendency to spin well for a short period of time and then seize up. The roller swivels spin very well and I haven't had any that failed as I tend to use those on my smaller under spins.
  4. You can't go by what the colors look like on the screen. That said, I have orange natures edge and it isn't bright and I like it for accent in craw patterns. Now, I get mine from Barlow's and the reason I mention that is because I had pumpkin natures edge from LPO and I got some from Barlow's and they were very different. The pumpkin from LPO was closer to orange and the pumpkin from Barlow's was more brown and I find that it happens a lot across different vendors. So if you want the burnt orange Dalmatian color then get the orange natures edge from Barlow's, the number is 602. Silicone Skirt Layers Nature's Edge - Barlow's Tackle (barlowstackle.com)
  5. Aside from the 90 degree hooks which seem to match up to the EC 570 you can tell by the number. The 10786 is equivalent to the Mustad 32786. The 10798 is equivalent to the Mustad 32798. If the number starts with a 10 it is a round bend, if it begins with 11 it is a V-Loc or sickle style. All you need to do is go to their website or Barlow's Tackle, Barlow's has the hooks categorized into 90 degree fine and heavy, 60 degree, 30 degree, and flat eye which makes it easy to find what you need.
  6. The hooks are legit!! I've used the round bend 10786 which is their version of the Mustad 32786 and it is a good hook. I also used the 11149 in a size #4 for crappie jigs and it is kind of a cross between the EC Lil nasty and the Matzuo sickle. The wire is about the same diameter as the EC, the first bend is the same as the Matzuo sickle and the point is slightly curved like the Lil nasty. I will say this, their points have held up so far and make no mistake, they are sharp. I have not used any of the larger V-Loc hooks but based on what I have experienced so far I know I'm going to get some eventually. I really want to try the 11798 for some shaky heads. The reason is the V-Loc or sickle style hooks really hold fish, at least the 90 degree ones do. I use a 3/0 EC Lil nasty for small finesse swimbaits with 6lb line for river smallmouth in clear shallow water. I have never had a fish throw it when using that hook. So I want to try it in the 60 degree flat eye version and see if it works as well as the 90 degree hooks do.
  7. Plated steel blades aren't that common anymore. Steel blades are more commonly sold raw or painted. Yes, most of the painted blades you buy are steel. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that I think you are talking about tarnish and not rust. Not all brass blades are equal, some are plain brass and then there are the lacquer coated brass blades. Plain brass blades, even those that are plated will tarnish. Lacquer coated ones will tarnish but it takes years but there is a way to prevent it. Take a damp, not wet, just damp towel and use it to apply a thin coat of your favorite paste car wax to the blade. Do it before storing your spinnerbaits and they won't tarnish. If you are in an area that you can fish year round then apply a coat about once a year and you'll be fine.
  8. 5102 just refers to LPO's catalog number, the actual hook number is 5304. LPO just forgot to put the number on their website. If you go to their site you'll see the Owner 5318 hook listed like this: 5101 Owner 5318 90 degree lite wire jig hooks. Then the have the other one as 5102 Owner 60 degree deep throat jig hooks, they omitted the number which is 5304.
  9. Why would you need to modify the mold? Do you want to use a different hook that might not fit? Are you wanting to change or add something? You only have to modify a mold if you want to use a hook that doesn't fit, or if you want to add a wire keeper or something else. I'll be honest, get a mold that you want that has all the elements you want without making changes. Don't worry about the hook brand, if you don't like a hook that the mold calls for there usually are alternatives and members here will let you know what fits. I say that because a lot of times a modified mold could get finicky and may need to be tilted a certain way or poured at a higher temperature to get a complete pour. You can end up with some flash that will need to be cleaned up so the straightforward pouring jig head now becomes a not so straightforward affair. Let us know what you want to do with that jig and we may be able to help.
  10. That is a great mod!!! I don't have an issue as I use hard lead for those. I like the flat head not only to make my plastics fit flush but I use that head for a lot of hair jigs and that collar would make most of them impossible to tie. The mod itself is a really good idea, especially when you consider that it still leaves ample room for the wire keeper. While it doesn't serve my needs I'll bet there are a bunch of people that would really benefit from that design, well done!!!!
  11. Here is where you can buy the Eagle Claw 2724 - Captain Hook's Discount Warehouse (captainhookswarehouse.com)
  12. Slow steady retrieve, you don't want to give it too much action.
  13. I like a 1/0 hook with my marabou jigs. I also like the 3/32oz weight as that fits my needs, yours may differ. I have several different versions that I tie but they all work well. I like the worm nose jig as well as the Midwest finesse jig for my marabou jigs.
  14. Tell that to my 2nd LEE pot that was ruined due to wheel weights with high zinc content...LOL!!!! I have a couple LEE production pots as back up and they won't get wheel weight lead if I have to put them back in service. The RCBS pro melt furnace I use now will never see a wheel weight, it may cost me a bit more for lead but I know what I'm melting and it is worry free.
  15. Apdriver is on the money with the Mustad 32833. I know of some good ones but once you add in that you want something with a reasonable price they all go out the window. Also, Aberdeen hooks are designed to bend out so when you get hung up the hook will straighten out and can then be bent back.
  16. As far as I know it is, the only place that I know sells it is Captain hooks. https://www.captainhookswarehouse.com/products/m92000npbn
  17. I don't know any that are available in the 1/0 size but there is an option for 3/0, 4/0, and 5/0. The VMC 7346 swimbait jig hook, it is a 45 degree hook made with heavier wire and the EWG bend like the hooks you are currently using. There is also the Mustad 92000 that starts at 3/0 and goes up. That hook is the same as the 91768 but is a little heavier wire so that may be something to look at as well.
  18. They are plated. There are places that you can send your baits to in order to have the heads chrome plated. I don't know if it would be worth the cost.
  19. I do that exact thing, the double barb holds well and the head shape skims over rocks really well.
  20. smalljaw

    hair jig

    http://www.leadersandlures.com/index.php?route=product/category&path=117_124
  21. I modified that mold to take a Mustad 91768 hook and it works. The issue though is the hook you want to use with it. There isn't a lot of room at the top by the hook eye for a large diameter hook. I used the 91768 in a 3/0 for the 3/8oz size, a 2/0 for the 1/4oz and a 1/0 for the 1/8oz and there is very little clearance but it does work. The success you will have will depend on the hook and the cavity you are using.
  22. What about the VMC 7250 in a 1/0 ? It is a long shank hook but it should be a little shorter than a regular 2/0. It is also available in both nickel and black nickel and is small enough in diameter that you would have issue using 8lb line.
  23. I think it is ok to do something like that as long as you market it as such. Perhaps a Halloween series or just a novelty lure as some people are into things like that. It also doesn't mean it it won't work but it is like Travis already said, the head design really offers nothing in the way of performance. I can't help but think of the Rebel crankbaits made to look like Camel Joe, beer cans, and even cartoon characters. Did they work? Yes, but we all know that there are days that fish will eat anything and a skull jighead would fall into that category. The head shape isn't offering more snag resistance, rock crawling ability, or some other trait that would make it a must have. It would be a jig that simply looks cool and then you have to decide if it is worth putting the time and effort into making something like that. I do think that if you wanted to do it just do make a unique head it would be fine but it would be a novelty jig head to most other anglers.
  24. I can't tell what wire or blade sizes the lures have but I'll guess. The first guess is going to be about the smaller spinner on the bottom. I'm seeing a small willow blade but the bait looks to have a heavier wire and a stirrup clevis. Willow blades are harder to get spinning on an in-line spinner but they will work. The one in the picture looks like the wire diameter is making you use a larger clevis and that is the problem. Small willow blades don't have a lot of torque so when you use them they need to be reeled extremely fast to spin. You do have to have the right clevis in order for that to happen though, if the clevis is too big the blade just can't generate enough torque to move the clevis completely around the wire. What you end up with is the blade rocking or wobbling back and forth rather than making full rotations (spinning). If that is the case the lure can't be fixed and you have to start over but I can't say for sure unless I know the wire diameter, blade and clevis size. The larger bait has a couple areas that may be an issue and the first is the skirt. It is out of proportion to the bait size and it might be disrupting water flow coming off the spinner blade keeping it from spinning. The next issue is the paint or whatever the white residue on the wire is, that could be causing a binding issue with the clevis. For that bait I'd clean the wire and then make sure the blade can spin freely. Then I'd take half of the skirt strands off of it and try it again, willow blades are hard to get started and it doesn't take much to affect the way they spin. The other thing is they spin in a tight arc, the skirt material is tied in an umbrella type configuration which makes it flare but pushes it closer to the blade. Just based on that I'm guessing it is causing a major water flow disruption and it is easy to find out if that is the problem. I'm not saying 100% that what I said are the exact issues but that is where I'd begin, good luck and let us know if you figure it out.
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