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atnipjd

The hazards of soft plastic bait making

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Melted plastic will always produce vapors - the higher the heat the more. Whether it causes serious chronic  respiratory problems is dependent on how much is melted and how often. Producing a good amount of lures to sell seems to be a sure way of upping the odds of that happening. Ventilation is key meaning the use of a fan to ventilate fumes upward into a ceiling vent or horizontally as in my example.

Like I said, I inhale second hand smoke from my pipe daily but not enough that I can't run up and down stairs a few times or jog 40 yards at a clip. If you can't do that without breathing difficulty, future lure making in quantity is in doubt. At most I only heat plastic 20 minutes in a 24 hour period and most times only a few times a week - if that.

My melted plastic has no smell but will if I heat it beyond a certain temperature.

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So, my son decided to expirement and melt down pieces of old senko baits he had collected and made his own molds to pour them in and proceeded to melt them down in my microwave in our kitchen! Do I need to worry about the fumes ruining my microwave or anything toxic getting into the food we heat in it? I did get a pretty good headache after he was done but I am very sensitive to smells and suffer headaches from just about anything. I can still smell it pretty well when I open the microwave, does that mean I now need to replace my microwave???

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18 hours ago, Jen said:

So, my son decided to expirement and melt down pieces of old senko baits he had collected and made his own molds to pour them in and proceeded to melt them down in my microwave in our kitchen! Do I need to worry about the fumes ruining my microwave or anything toxic getting into the food we heat in it? I did get a pretty good headache after he was done but I am very sensitive to smells and suffer headaches from just about anything. I can still smell it pretty well when I open the microwave, does that mean I now need to replace my microwave???

If he only did a little, it should be no problem, but don't let him keep doing it.  Wipe down the inside with dish washing soap and water, then rinse it really well and wipe it dry.  Let it sit to dry with the door open.

He needs to be out of the house when he makes plastisol baits, and use a dedicated microwave with good ventilation and a respirator with a solvent-filter, like painters use.  3M makes them, and they are a good investment in your child's health.

Here's what I use:  https://www.homedepot.com/p/3M-Medium-Paint-Project-Respirator-Mask-6211PA1-A/100653900

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19 hours ago, rhahn427 said:

I would not use a microwave for cooking food after I cooked plastisol in it.  Microwaves are not that expensive and I wouldn’t take a chance.  Besides, it may make your food taste funny or worse.

So that's the reason my kids say I can't cook!  Hahaha

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heres what i know from the 2 weeks ive done soft plastic baits. i think the most dangerous moment is when u overcook it and u leave it in the cup. my cup exploded into pieces as i was messing with choppin up the burn plastic it seems to have released a heavy amt of vapor enough to make me cough. 2nd most dangerous moment is when ur open pouring and ur face is right there near the fumes. in a total of about 8 days ive produced over 1200 baits. its that addicting. i wish i had more ventilation, but for now i have 1 fan blowinf twds the window and another one blowing it out the window.....u can never have enough ventilation. my advice is never cook over a cup for more than 3 minutes....1/2 cups 2 min and anything less if u absolutely have to cook it off then 1 minute or throw it in with ur next batch regardless of color, unless u have to be picky. try and keep ur face as far away from fumes by learning to pour with ur face away.....kinda like a bartender pours wine or beer.

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On 3/19/2020 at 10:24 PM, atnipjd said:

Hello all. I’m very new to the world of soft plastic bait making and I’m pretty concerned about the health effects of plastisol. If I’m using a fan and wearing a respirator, along with using pthalate free plastisol such as the one Do It Molds sells, have I eliminated all of the chemical health risk associated with heating plastisol? I know there are always what I will call mechanical dangers such as spilling hot plastic or your Pyrex cup exploding and so forth. I feel I can mitigate most of those risk by wearing the proper PPE and just taking my time. However, I’m very concerned with the chemical side of things from a health standpoint. Any information you can share would be appreciated! 

I'm probably late to the discussion, however, I am chemical science instructor for HAZMAT teams. Plastisol is listed as a carcinogen when heated. Wearing the proper PPE is highly recommended. The off gassing is will cause respiratory issues, and as one post stated it is caustic when the eyes are exposed to the gasses. Plastisol has been found in homemade explosives. A color change that occurs while heating in a microwave is a sure sign of over heating. I don't feel comfortable working with something like this. I'm not saying that you shouldn't, but I am saying that you should be aware of the hazards of this chemical. 

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19 hours ago, Fishin Big said:

I'm probably late to the discussion, however, I am chemical science instructor for HAZMAT teams. Plastisol is listed as a carcinogen when heated. Wearing the proper PPE is highly recommended. The off gassing is will cause respiratory issues, and as one post stated it is caustic when the eyes are exposed to the gasses. Plastisol has been found in homemade explosives. A color change that occurs while heating in a microwave is a sure sign of over heating. I don't feel comfortable working with something like this. I'm not saying that you shouldn't, but I am saying that you should be aware of the hazards of this chemical. 

PPE is great but is always the last line of defense.. engineering controls are first and foremost.  Vent with proper CFM and enjoy.

 

 

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