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Roger LaPointe

quick question on flotation additive

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I have made hundreds of floating baits using the floating "bubble" additive, and have never experienced the baits being too soft. If anything, they were hardened up using the additive.

I use mostly soft plastisol. And yes the additive does wash out the color. One color I've made a lot of floating baits with is black. That should be the easiest color to make, but even black requires a lot of colorant to make it truly black, or you end up with grey of a washed out black.

I'm using a lot of additive to make baits that will float high on the surface to float over lily pads and such. Some other bait makers just make their baits float enough to suspend.

Either way plan on using a lot of colorant.

And if you want your biats to float. test the first couple of baits in a bucket of water with a hook in it. Once on the water with floating baits it's too late to find out they don't float.

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I will usually start with 4oz plastic, then add by volume around 2oz of additive, and some softener. Stir, bake until ready. Pour, or inject. Give the float test. Repeat until satisfied with results. Just keep adding floatant in small amounts until satidfied.

That about as close to a recipe that I use for floaters. I do both hand pours, and injected stuff.  One thing to keep in mind, if you're fishing the floating lure weightless, they don't cast very far.

 

I'm typically using a 2/0 EWG thin wire hook. You'll have to adjust for your hooks

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If you want to use hardener, add it to the plastic before it's heated, and stir it well.  If you add it to hot plastic, it won't mix and you'll get lumps.

When I want to add hardener to some already cooked, but cold, plastic, I mix the hardener with new plastic in a separate bowl, until it's completely mixed, and then add it to the cold plastic and heat them both together, stirring as soon as the old stuff is soft.

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Thanks Mark, I really appreciated you sharing your expertise, your willingness to share really saving me some real time and hassles not to mention probably ruining a bunch of materials. When I as a young man I was a wood worker and there were people that when I was to ask a question, they were less than helpful. Turns out to them knowledge was power and since they might have learned the hard way they felt I should have to do the same. I was never that way, I was always willing to share what I knew and help them any way I could. I'm glad that you are cut from the same cloth. I'm retired now and live on a very, very low income . . .  I've come to realize this is really not a cheap endeavor. I've always been a inventor of sorts and have started to do this on a shoe string, I'm starting out pouring my own molds, even going so far as to mold my baits out of clay as a master. I'm no artist but so far I'm having fun and little by little things are starting to come together. By the way that's a nice little bass you have in your picture, that's about the size we use for bait here in Texas . . . . of course I'm kidding. How much did it weigh? Where did you catch it? Did you catch it on one of your own baits? While I have bass fished all over this country my best was probably in the 6 -7 pound range. Well thanks again for sharing hope you and your family are staying safe in this crazy time we're living in.

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On 8/17/2020 at 6:55 AM, Roger LaPointe said:

Thanks Mark, I really appreciated you sharing your expertise, your willingness to share really saving me some real time and hassles not to mention probably ruining a bunch of materials. When I as a young man I was a wood worker and there were people that when I was to ask a question, they were less than helpful. Turns out to them knowledge was power and since they might have learned the hard way they felt I should have to do the same. I was never that way, I was always willing to share what I knew and help them any way I could. I'm glad that you are cut from the same cloth. I'm retired now and live on a very, very low income . . .  I've come to realize this is really not a cheap endeavor. I've always been a inventor of sorts and have started to do this on a shoe string, I'm starting out pouring my own molds, even going so far as to mold my baits out of clay as a master. I'm no artist but so far I'm having fun and little by little things are starting to come together. By the way that's a nice little bass you have in your picture, that's about the size we use for bait here in Texas . . . . of course I'm kidding. How much did it weigh? Where did you catch it? Did you catch it on one of your own baits? While I have bass fished all over this country my best was probably in the 6 -7 pound range. Well thanks again for sharing hope you and your family are staying safe in this crazy time we're living in.

Roger, I am a retired carpenter, 50+ years in the trade, and I feel the same way.  I was fortunate enough to learn my craft(s) from WW2 vets who were used to pulling on the same end of the rope to get the job done.  There were a few who were selfish, always worried that teaching someone else would mean eventually losing their job to whoever they taught , but I have never found that to be true.  Selfish people never lasted on the job, but I've had people I've taught come back to me and say thank you, years later.  Everything I know about lure making I learned here on TU, from others willing share their knowledge.  I think it's only right to turn around and share what I now know with other people.  What goes around comes around.

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I know what you mean about people thinking your going after their job. Years ago when I was a leadman building furniture for private jets,Learjets and such, it was my job to teach the new ones. I was more than willing to train them until some would get the idea that now that they were trained they were as smart as me and sometimes tried to undermine me with the boss. That was when they "Graduated" and I'd let them realize you don't learn everything in a month of training. I do appreciate you sharing . . . makes things alittle easier and cheaper

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On 8/19/2020 at 7:25 PM, Roger LaPointe said:

I know what you mean about people thinking your going after their job. Years ago when I was a leadman building furniture for private jets,Learjets and such, it was my job to teach the new ones. I was more than willing to train them until some would get the idea that now that they were trained they were as smart as me and sometimes tried to undermine me with the boss. That was when they "Graduated" and I'd let them realize you don't learn everything in a month of training. I do appreciate you sharing . . . makes things alittle easier and cheaper

Funny how that works.  Life is too short to be chickenshit.

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I have used Alumalite micro balloons. Had to add a ton of them and be very carefull to not inhale them. They are white so as said you need a lot of a dark colorant. It will also make the bait very stiff so a lot of softener is needed. Baits are very weak and rip on the hook. Also dont overheat or reheat as the hheat causes the balloons to pop and not float.

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