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Kyler M

Powder over colorant

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How many of you have experimented using powder pigment over regular liquid colorant? What all do you guys use and is there any advantages to using it? Any help or tips would be appreciated! 

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I’ve not done that.  I’m not sure how or if it would hold up.  First, the paint would have to be heated to over 300 degrees for the powder paint to melt and cover.  If that did hold up, you would be binding powder paint to an overheated paint so it may not hold up.

I don’t know how a regular liquid colorant would be applied to a hard surface without mixing it with a paint substrate.  Liquid colorant is supposed to be mixed with another medium like paint or plastisol

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13 minutes ago, rhahn427 said:

I’ve not done that.  I’m not sure how or if it would hold up.  First, the paint would have to be heated to over 300 degrees for the powder paint to melt and cover.  If that did hold up, you would be binding powder paint to an overheated paint so it may not hold up.

I don’t know how a regular liquid colorant would be applied to a hard surface without mixing it with a paint substrate.  Liquid colorant is supposed to be mixed with another medium like paint or plastisol

He's talking about powder colorant for plastisol mixed into the plastisol... not powder paint over the top of a bait.

With that being said - I've only used pearls and some color shifting mica I had leftover from painting cranks instead of colorant - and it works nice... like everything else - you have to mess around to figure out the right amount to use.

For me - I sort of mix "seat of the pants style" even with liquid instead of counting every drop.... and powders seems a little more fussy as you can over do it quickly (compare to drops of liquid) so get a really small spoon (REALLY SMALL) and try to be precise. I also found it a little harder to stir/mix evenly into the plastic compared to liquid - and that's with stirrers running in a presto - as if the powder drops in and gets on the blades or pot before the plastisol - it just stays there - no way to really "push it in to the mix"..... again - sort of me being a little sloppy when using it - liquid seems a little more user friendly.

Personally the two big benefits seem to be it won't bleed and you can use a variety of color shifts from what I've seen.... I'm interested to hear what others are doing and how it goes.

J.

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I've found that when using powders it's easier to add before cooking. Have dabbled around with them but just sticking with liquids myself. The color shift does have some appeal but will they catch more fish than green pumpkin? 

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2 hours ago, basskat said:

I've found that when using powders it's easier to add before cooking. Have dabbled around with them but just sticking with liquids myself. The color shift does have some appeal but will they catch more fish than green pumpkin? 

It better catch more fish... why else would I spend more money and time!!! LOL!!   I go crazy with baits just to drive my friends nuts that I have something they don't... but then again... what if Green Pumpkin shifts to Watermelon then back!!! LOL!!  J.

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I'm an hobbyist and lastly I played around with several mica and shifting powder pigments. I put Mica powder pigments, taken in artistic shops, directly inside hot plastisol, obtaining massive baits, for instance with white mica I reach a great marble white, a good base for following "painting". Instead with shifting powder pigments, coming from nail art, I brush them with a sponge over the bait surface. The best result is obtained with a black base (obtained for instance with black powder pigment ...be careful about scorching plastisol), after that I fix the pigments with a torch and encapsulate them with a hot or cold coat.

Well, every time you change the base color, you reach a different shifting result.

Till now I used only "white" shifting powder pigments, not those ones colored, used in the automotive field, and to mix them in hot plastisol has been an unsuceful trial. I'm waiting Chinese colored shifting powder pigments and I'll try again to use in mass ... finger cross.

Lastly I received some basic solvent lacquer colors for the soft bait surface, it's possible to use them only with a brush, and I tried to mix yellow with gold powder pigment, here the result:

 

Bye Cami

1061732613_20210321h.jpg

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I have used some colorshift Pearl powder from here https://didspade.com/

to color plastisol for swimbaits and doing a laminate bait. Works really well and gives some look that’s hard to get with liquid colorants. I like adding it as opposed to brushing it on. Here’s a couple.

image.jpeg.27702c709c68f2d2c25d893bfa6ad88b.jpeg

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Apdriver said:

I have used some colorshift Pearl powder from here https://didspade.com/

to color plastisol for swimbaits and doing a laminate bait. Works really well and gives some look that’s hard to get with liquid colorants. I like adding it as opposed to brushing it on. Here’s a couple.

... me too, but till now I found only shifting powder pigments that cannot be added to hot plastisol, or better you can, but the result is really poor, even if you mix them with black.

I'm waiting to receive from China some colored shifting powder pigments, then I'll show you the results of coloring soft bais in mass.

Bye

 

Cami

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12 hours ago, Apdriver said:

I have used some colorshift Pearl powder from here https://didspade.com/

to color plastisol for swimbaits and doing a laminate bait. Works really well and gives some look that’s hard to get with liquid colorants. I like adding it as opposed to brushing it on. Here’s a couple.

image.jpeg.27702c709c68f2d2c25d893bfa6ad88b.jpeg

 

 

 

Very fishy, nice.

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On 3/22/2021 at 7:01 PM, Cami said:

after that I fix the pigments with a torch and encapsulate them with a hot or cold coat.

Hi Cami,

Can you please elborate on what you would use for a "cold coat" to cover the bait after applying the powder?

Thanks

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French Recipe for Soft Baits Cold Coat: 50% PVC Glue + 50% MEK (Methyl Ethil Ketone).

You can only brush it, you cannot airbrush ir.

You can also add powder or liquid pigments or glitters.

It works also as a bonding system to repair soft baits.

Bye

 

Cami

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49 minutes ago, Cami said:

French Recipe for Soft Baits Cold Coat: 50% PVC Glue + 50% MEK (Methyl Ethil Ketone).

You can only brush it, you cannot airbrush ir.

You can also add powder or liquid pigments or glitters.

It works also as a bonding system to repair soft baits.

Bye

 

Cami

Nice, I'll give it a try.

Thanks Cami.

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On 3/24/2021 at 4:10 PM, Apdriver said:

I have used some colorshift Pearl powder from here https://didspade.com/

to color plastisol for swimbaits and doing a laminate bait. Works really well and gives some look that’s hard to get with liquid colorants. I like adding it as opposed to brushing it on. Here’s a couple.

image.jpeg.27702c709c68f2d2c25d893bfa6ad88b.jpeg

 

 

 

Wow!  Those are beautiful!

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