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Glide Bait Design

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I'm planning to try and build my own glide bait soon.  The current plan is to design and 3d print a master, make a mold, and pour resin to create the baits and I'm trying to get a good understanding of how it should be weighted to keep it as stable as possible during fast retrieves.  Most videos I've seen online they just glue some weights to the bottom of the lure after it's all said and done but I was thinking about creating some kind of harness with lead towards the bottom of the bait and maybe foam towards the top.  

The bait would either be two sides per piece, glued together at the end with the harness sandwiched in, or poured with the harness already inside the mold.  Anyone here have experience doing this and could tell me if I'm on the right track or not?

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I think that you might be getting the cart before the horse a little by 3D printing first, but .....

Glide baits are a broad category of baits, and getting them to "glide" often takes a lot of work just getting the shape right, and then, getting weight right.

As for the rest, I pour with the weight in place, and have used foam on the top.  It takes a little adjustment to get it right, but it makes for one solid bait.

 

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For the very first bait pouring without weight is obvious. It will take a digital scale and experimentation to get the sink rate that you want to achieve. Once you know your desired weight you can include them in your molds. This will speed up production.  However not every one will be perfect. 

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I think people don't know what they are getting into when they say " I am making a glide bait" Hands down it's the most temperamental bait to make!! the bait characteristics will change with elevation, temperature, line size, snaps, no snap, barometric pressure...and folks there are many more considerations that can/will effect a glide bait.

I am not saying don't try to make a glide bait but get ready to be frustrated at almost every turn to get a decent glide bait and not a paper weight.

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i think your on a fine track. but as others have stated you will just need to do a lot of R&D work to figure out the densities / weighting required for the size and shape and desired actions. So think out a plan of how you can build test baits that you can control the variables well, with a mind always how you can build one repeatable if you plan on selling. 

 

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You can do most of the R+D on the computer using your CAD software. Inputting material densities and ballast positions, you can get your lure to float exactly how you want it to, with the desired buoyancy too. Split body materials can also be modeled, saving probably a hundred hours or more of test pours.

Dave

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A few questions, thoughts and things to consider IMHO!

Is this your first time designing building a lure? 

What type of glide bait a 1 piece or 2 piece?

If 2 piece glide like others have mentioned in my years of building baits (and a few years tinkering on 2 piece glides) I still dont fully understand them and the mechanics. They are by far the most difficult lure to get perfect.

In general your first baits probably are not going to work how you would like.

The time and monetary investment to design and mold them will be fairly substantial. 

 

Now If I haven't scared you off you can do things in the order you mention. I have not poured the 2 sides and glued them but I make balsa cranks that way and its fine. Pouring a bait with an internal harness is fine as long as you use your loops as locators and to hold the harness straight. I would strongly suggest building a few baits by hand to get an idea of what works and doesn't or at least copy a known design to test your methods. You are going to have a learning curve and mess things up at first I know I did but thats ok and part of learning. 

Whatever you decide ask questions lots of good people on here.

 

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In another forum thread on the Hard Baits Forum, several years ago, I learned that making sure that the two sections fall at the same rate, fall horizontal, and have friction-free hinges, were the keys to getting my two piece glide baits to glide.  Be sure you have all the hardware, and the hook/split rings, attached when you float test each section side by side, and not attached to each other.

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