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Spraying powder question for the experts

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I have the powder airbrush  from TJ's. When I'm spraying powder to get a dark back on, for example, a spinnerbait head, I'm getting the powder spray coming around and adhering to the back of the head, too. I am spraying into a box to limit mess and recover some of the overspray. Not sure if that is the issue (creating air swirling inside the box?). Move the box further back? Any insights appreciated. 

Getting black to spray without clogging is a whole different issue but I think that's the nature of the black more than anything.

For the makeup brush tappers, I get a pretty overbearing dose of powder when I try that. Any tips for more finesse with that?

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For your brush tapping, I found after loading your brush with powder paint, tap some back in your container to remove some paint off your brush. This will allow you to finesse what’s left onto the bait. 

I’m leaving to powder spray to someone else. Never was any good at it:-)
 

 

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 I  have found that the air brush for powder is not very good for small  detail . In my experience it puts out a lot of powder  and is difficult to be  accurate. I find it is great for  base coating blades and heads and for blend one color into another  to get a smooth two color  finish with out the thickness of paint that you can get from brush dropping two colors. The excessive paint spray definitely causes  more of a recovery/ clean up  issue and uses a lot of paint compared to brush tapping , dipping or fluid bed painting . It has its place in the craft and if practiced dose a great job for what it costs.

As for brush tapping, I use cheep  acid brushes, have not yet tried make up brushes. I first  tune my brush up by pushing it into the palm of my hand to spread the fibers apart to change the amount of volume that the brush will hold to get different affects and yes dip and tap off the excess powder if you need less before tapping over your work.  I also like to use what I call salt and pepper shaker delivery for doing the detail work like top of jig heads ,backs of  minnow shaped jig heads ,kill spots etc. If your not familiar it is like an old  film roll  canister , one inch sized craft plastic cup with a snap on lid, easily purchased at dollar store or craft store everywhere. Drill a single small hole in the center of the lid and shake or drop the powder out by tapping it like the brush method. Different sized holes for different volumes of power flow. Not my invention or idea , got it reading on this site  a few years back  but has allowed me to do some really interesting effects  creating some life like imitation bait fish designs. Like every part of our craft, figure  out  what you want to do and match or make the   tools to get it done ,then above all  practice the technic until you master it or are happy with the result. Hope this helps. Cheers

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Outlaw4 the answer to your question is hot enough to get the powder paint to melt / change state on your jig or blade with out overheating the intended project ie melting the lead or burning the brass, metal etc. . Heat sources like hot air guns are great for smaller jigs and blades if your work isn't to large to prewarm fairly quickly. If you are doing bigger stuff with more lead density metal mass  to get the desired effect I use a propane torch on low flame .I move the project around back and forth  above the actual flame (heat cone) not directly into the flame itself.  Hot air is a little more forgiving as to how long you can and need to warm your piece. Start with a slow count of seconds and then try a drop of powder on your work. See how it reacts. If its not hot enough then put back under the air again for another few seconds.  Same goes for the torch timing. When I first started using the powder spray gun I found the air gun took to long and did not warm the blades fast enough to do a lot of larger  blades and achieve a nice smooth coverage without having to reheat several times between coats . Every time you reheat you have to  be aware of the possibility that there is a chance of burning the paint layer that you have already been able to apply.. once the melt temp is achieved and you want to add some more paint ,it will take less time to bring the temp back up unless you have really delayed application for a bit. The paint will tell the tail. Residual heat will stay in the lead or blade for quite a while. Enough to be a burn hazard to unprotected skin. Wear gloves and hold part with forceps.   To do your second color over the first you do not need to  heat cure  to say, like bake the painted part in an oven ,just reapply enough heat to bring the temp up and  spray, drop, shake add the second color without burning /overheating the first color. Powder can be applied right over top of a base color without bleeding. In some cases like a white base will enhance a chartreuse over coat etc. Once you have attained the color and look of the bait that you wanted  Then you can cure /bake it in an a dedicated  oven  to attain the high gloss tough finish. Usually between 250 to 350Degrees for 20 to 30 minutes. Everyone has there own preferences and experiences.  All of this is trial and error, timing and practice. Comfort level ,equipment available and knowing  ones abilities and surroundings all are variables to consider . Each can and may change the  timing of how long you need to  preheat. I do a lot of work in an unheated basement at approx. 60*f. All of my jigs and  blades and molds are at room temp to start. Some guys may be in there garage even colder or warmer. It all changes the timing and prep time to get a reliable quality finish.   Hope this makes sense to you and answers your question. Cheers 

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I saw a video of a guy using a salt shaker.  To limit the flow he taped over as many holes as he wanted so he could control the powder.  I haven't tried this yet, but it's on my list.

Smalljaw has some great stuff out there on this topic too.  I posted a question about multiple colors with powder and got some great feedback.  You can find it in this forum somewhere in the not-too-distant past.

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On 2/25/2022 at 8:40 AM, Outlaw4 said:

blending

 

 

Happens to me with chartreuse. Baking the base color before adding another fixes that

 

 

 

 

On 2/25/2022 at 8:40 AM, Outlaw4 said:

 

 

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