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william cohen

Bead in between clevis

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I would think that if bead and clevis is not proportionate it could cause some jamming or delayed blade pick up when it hits the water plus it may cause a bit more friction /wind resistance if fouled while casting. Other than adding a bit of weight, minimal and a bit of added color /flash /originality to your creation I would be surprised if it increases blade spin or reduces friction. As the blade lifts it pulls outward on the clevis and would not even touch the bead. I have seen a lot of designs of spinners that are using tandem blade clevis set ups with the bead actually providing a bearing surface between clevis surfaces and that has performance value. That is the beauty of creative energy and design,  if you like it and it works then go for it . A bead dose not cost a lot unless your going into full production mode so make some and try em out on the fish. If they like em your golden. Just my feed back  . 

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4 hours ago, william cohen said:

canuck2, thank you for your opinion. The reason for the bead is to act as a bearing to help the clevis to move freely which in turn would allow the blade to rotate faster?

I would test that idea with an air compressor to see if it is actually the case.  That's how I test all my propped baits.

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William yes I understand what you want to achieve . Metal beads provide a reduced contact surface area between components and that is why they are usually round for our purpose. On a wire shaft lure  the clevis holding/ supporting the blade  moves back and forth along the wire shaft until the lure is retrieved.  At that point drag pulls everything along the shaft toward the back of the lure  putting load or pressure against all the components. The more weight that each component is subjected to   is different as you move from back to front  along the shaft . Certain key bearing or bead surfaces do more work for you than others . If the front  bead ahead of the clevis has no real weight forced against it, dose it actually do anything to improve rotation ,How can it reduce friction if there is none to contend with ? The bead in your example  is between the clevis legs  and sees no real side load or weight pushing on it. I certainly recommend a bead down stream  on shaft contacting the clevis  and up stream of it if your  mounting anything else  that would directly rub against the clevis surface.  A bead between clevis legs can be decorative and dose not need to be heavy ,metal and as it has no side load imparted to it , it is totally up to you if you want to use it or not .IMHO. 

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I have found in fishing inline spinners that I have a lot more bites at the bottom end of the blade speed, almost to the point that the blade will stutter/shimmy  or just stop... I would say 90% of all my fish come from the unstable slower speeds.

You need to figure out what works for the fish and area you are fishing.

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19 minutes ago, azsouth said:

I have found in fishing inline spinners that I have a lot more bites at the bottom end of the blade speed, almost to the point that the blade will stutter/shimmy  or just stop... I would say 90% of all my fish come from the unstable slower speeds.

You need to figure out what works for the fish and area you are fishing.

I do the same thing with chatterbaits in the winter.  I drag them slowly along the bottom, with a rage bug trailer, so the blade acts like a rattle.

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19 hours ago, azsouth said:

I have found in fishing inline spinners that I have a lot more bites at the bottom end of the blade speed, almost to the point that the blade will stutter/shimmy  or just stop... I would say 90% of all my fish come from the unstable slower speeds.

You need to figure out what works for the fish and area you are fishing.

The last part of your comment is bang on. Personally I have had good luck with bass running really slow but when it comes to trout and coho salmon a fast spinning blade swung slowly through a river is king

Just like all lure fishing you need to try different retrieves till you find what they want and it can change depending on temperature or other conditions 

As for the original post have you tested it yet? Personally I could see it interrupting the spinning of the blade do to it making contact with the bead. Small metal beads on the outside of the clevis top and bottom is definitely the proven way to achieve a good spin 

If it causes the blade to stutter you might get a click sound of the bead and blade making contact. This might be something useful 

test it and let’s hear the feedback 

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The good part, when the spinner was reeled at the normal speed it ran very well.  To my  eyes I believe it spun faster than any other lure I tested. But it has many negative's. At a slower speed trying to just roll the blade over it would not start. Blade stayed close to the wire. Tried to jerk the spinner it would not start. Only fast speed made it work.

Well nothing ventured nothing gained. 

Learned a great deal from you posts. Thanks for everything.

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