NMELO

Crankbait - Best Foil Option

9 posts in this topic

Hi,

In my optimization crankbait´s, i want to know what type of foil are used in this lures !

I think in some situations, lures with foil, make the diference !

Now i ask fore some experient gays, to help us, to find the correct foil to use in our lures and how to apply it ?

By

Nuno

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The search function can be your best friend when trying to find information on just about every aspect of lure building. Just type "foil" into the box in the top right hand corner and click on the magnifying glass beside it and it will lead you to a vast amount of info.

Here's one to get you started.

http://www.tackleunderground.com/community/topic/22571-tips-on-foiling-baits/page__p__168628__hl__foil__fromsearch__1#entry168628

Ben

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Hi,

In my optimization crankbait´s, i want to know what type of foil are used in this lures !

I think in some situations, lures with foil, make the diference !

Now i ask fore some experient gays, to help us, to find the correct foil to use in our lures and how to apply it ?

By

Nuno

hmmmmmm

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I buy foil at a candy making shop, then use permanent stick glue to apply it to the crankbait. Rub a knurled (like some ratchet handles) object over for the scale effect.

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Hi Nuno,

Here is a quick run down on what I am currently using to foil baits, it is by no means the only way or the best but merely what I have settled on so far... I want to try embossing/leafing but have yet to make the effort or buy the materials.

I use a Aluminium tape, generally found in hardware stores for plumbing repairs or for ducting sealing. Some electronics stores may stock it for RF shielding. It has a good adhesive and sticks well.

Tape.jpg

The best tape is the thinnest you can find, it varies between brands. The thinner the foil the easier to work and smooth out any wrinkles, convex curves are a challenge but you will learn your own limits and the tape's with some practice. Relief cuts may be needed or they can be designed to fit your lure's overall look. Once again the thinner the tape the easier it is to cover seams/joins with epoxy or the finish you are using. Hence the reason I want to try leafing as it so thin.

Trace the outline of your lure, make sure it is a little bit oversize to go around the curves. Cut out the shape and apply the tape to the lure, use your thumb to work the tape down the center/lateral line of the lure, the slowly stick down the rest a little at a time. I use a hard plastic rod that is very smooth to work the tape further. When finished a cast iron rod can be rubbed over the Aluminium tape to get it to really shine.

It takes practice, after a few baits you will be confident and producing a better finished product.

Here is a 100mm hand carved wooden minnow using the above technique ( I produced the scale effect using the knurling on my exacto knife )

FoilMinnow2.jpg

FoilMinnow.jpg

Here is a flat foil finish on a diving minnow... 170g & 265mm long.

Testbait1.jpg

Another flat finish on a WTD minnow... 90g and 200mm long. ( I added the lateral line in the foil )

360SKIM.jpg

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Hi Nuno,

Here is a quick run down on what I am currently using to foil baits, it is by no means the only way or the best but merely what I have settled on so far... I want to try embossing/leafing but have yet to make the effort or buy the materials.

I use a Aluminium tape, generally found in hardware stores for plumbing repairs or for ducting sealing. Some electronics stores may stock it for RF shielding. It has a good adhesive and sticks well.

Tape.jpg

The best tape is the thinnest you can find, it varies between brands. The thinner the foil the easier to work and smooth out any wrinkles, convex curves are a challenge but you will learn your own limits and the tape's with some practice. Relief cuts may be needed or they can be designed to fit your lure's overall look. Once again the thinner the tape the easier it is to cover seams/joins with epoxy or the finish you are using. Hence the reason I want to try leafing as it so thin.

Trace the outline of your lure, make sure it is a little bit oversize to go around the curves. Cut out the shape and apply the tape to the lure, use your thumb to work the tape down the center/lateral line of the lure, the slowly stick down the rest a little at a time. I use a hard plastic rod that is very smooth to work the tape further. When finished a cast iron rod can be rubbed over the Aluminium tape to get it to really shine.

It takes practice, after a few baits you will be confident and producing a better finished product.

Here is a 100mm hand carved wooden minnow using the above technique ( I produced the scale effect using the knurling on my exacto knife )

FoilMinnow2.jpg

FoilMinnow.jpg

Here is a flat foil finish on a diving minnow... 170g & 265mm long.

Testbait1.jpg

Another flat finish on a WTD minnow... 90g and 200mm long. ( I added the lateral line in the foil )

360SKIM.jpg

Those look great! Do you need to prepare the foil in any way before applying paint?

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I do not take any special steps to prep the foil, I make sure it is clean and wipe with a tack cloth.

I don't paint directly onto the foiled surface, I lay down 1-2 coats of epoxy before paint. This way the seam/join in the foil is not seen under the paint, as we all know the slightest imperfection is amplified when it comes to paint. The foil really makes the paint "pop" a lot better than my photo's would show.

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