Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 11/05/2021 in all areas

  1. I learned from the store "Tap Plastics" where I buy some epoxy and "lexan" scraps that it is OK to apply Epoxy over Polyester (UV resin) but it is not OK to apply Polyester over Epoxy.
    3 points
  2. I, have found an easier way to pour weedguards in a mold without getting all of the strands fanned out. I've tried this on the small .078 weedguard holes and the .050 holes. I went on line and found some really small diameter heat shrink tubing that fits around the weedguard. Put the heatshrink tubing around the weedguard (it will be a snug fit). Stick the whole assembly into the mold where the weedguard is supposed to go. Push the weedguard up against the hook and back off the heat shrink tubing so it only goes to the top of the jig head in the mold, not all the way into the mold. Close the mold and pour away. Once you open the mold slide off the heat shrink tubing. The weedguard strands stay intact. I am off to work but I will post a pic tonight. Also I found the heat shrink tubing on Amamzon. I don't remember if I bought precut pieces or a roll and cut 40 or 50 pieces to the length of the weedguard. It really is easy. More info to follow tonight. Just a note, I only pour weedguards in place, when someone isn't going to powder paint or if someone is going to airbrush. You can't powder paint jig bodies with weedgurds in place, because you will melt the weedguards.
    2 points
  3. Get this stuff in .078" diameter to make your own pins for the 1/8oz FG-12. PTFE Wire | Contenti
    2 points
  4. After experimenting with pouring the lead with the weedguard in place, I’m not a fan. There’s a reason they made the base hole pins. The heat of the molten lead melts the fibers of the weedguard and flairs what remains above the head. It makes for funky look and presentation. Try contacting Cadman for some base hole pins that will fit that smaller cavity and order some small weedguards.
    2 points
  5. I haven't fished a Fat Albert grub, but I did find this one... https://www.baitjunkys.com/Fat-Albert_p_535.html I can't speak to this mold as I don't own it and I found it on a Google search.. I fish the Do-it Molds 3" Essential Series grub. https://barlowstackle.com/Do-It-Essentials-Grub-Mold-3-P3682/. It may not be what you are looking for, but the mold is relatively low cost, and the bait catches fish. Do it also has their Chub Grub. https://store.do-itmolds.com/3-K-Chub-4-cavity_p_1106.html
    2 points
  6. I've built a lot of different things over the years. Mostly guitars and more recently it's been furniture like entry tables. I've picked up welding over the last couple years. Very novice, but I do a good enough job to make leg sets for tables. I built a boat when the covid thing started and sold it after its maiden voyage. And I'm also into jiu jitsu, which I like to describe as the art of folding clothes... While people are still wearing them.
    2 points
  7. I have no issues putting AlumiUV over Epoxy or Epoxy over AlumiUV. I think it depends on the UV.
    2 points
  8. Hello, I use Alumilite resin for many lure making projects. Although I haven't tried this, would mixing micro balloons in with a resin, such as Alumilite White that cures hard within five minutes, actually add buoyancy to the lure when the coating is applied as the first layer on the lure instead of adding a coat of primer paint as the first layer?
    1 point
  9. This stuff is the exact same as the original Pledge Floor Care Multi-Surface; same ingredients, same SCJ formula 35*3597. Just rebranded, I've been using it since the other stuff went off the shelves and it works exactly the same...
    1 point
  10. Fill the area with red high temp silicone to block the lead flow. If you decide to pour jigs with a weedguard or keeper, the silicone can be removed.
    1 point
  11. Very sad to hear. Ben and I talked about jigs and how I make them. He even bought a few from me that I custom made for him. Really great guy. Going to miss the times he and I chatted on the phone and thru e-mails.
    1 point
  12. 1 point
  13. In the Northeast, two types of rigs are popular. I don't see why they wouldn't work elsewhere. One is like a pompano rig with the weight being at the end. Your main line is tied to a barrel swivel. You tie a line from the barrel swivel to a snap with a couple of dropper loops spaced apart in between the barrel swivel and the snap. On the dropper loops, you rig a hook with bright tubing, a grub, or a streamer fly. On the snap, you can use a diamond jig if you have a pier or boat you can vertical jig from. If you can’t vertically jig, you can just put on a sinker. The other rig is a sinker slider rig. We use those instead of a Carolina rig set up. Slide main line through a sinker slider, put on a bead or a silicone skirt collar, tie on barrel swivel, from the barrel swivel tie your leader and hook/jig/fly. The bead/collar will protect your knot from the sinker slider. This set up has some advantages. You can use a braid main line and a mono or flouro leader. If your hook gets snagged, you can break it off and save the rest of the rig. The sinker slider has a clip so you can swap sinkers easily without having to tie a new rig if you need to change weights. You can pre-try some hooks so all you have to do is tie 1 knot if the line near the hook gets frayed. I usually use bait on a circle hook on this rig. I have also used some of the Gulp products and also a saltwater buck tail streamer fly. These flies have no weight and just flutter in the water. If there is current such as incoming and outgoing tide at a river mouth, we use the flat disc river sinkers. Strong current can cause bank sinkers and egg sinkers to roll on the bottom causing snags and line twist.
    1 point
  14. George If it were my choice for a saltwater lure, I would use a resin poured lure or a PVC and all this worry about water penetration would be over, and get to testing the lure out and catch some fish. I realize that sometimes we try different methods but sometime we just get stubborn (like myself) and finally go to a proven way. But if you may then go to it. Regards Wayne
    1 point
  15. JD, Once again thanks for sharing your knowledge. I watched the video and realized I can add an ink/dye and experiment with time and absorbance and possibly get a clue and weigh each and see if I can find a happy medium. Thanks for any and all insights.
    1 point
  16. I have never done vacuum sealing so I don’t know if this will help. Like Mark, I have sealed with Minwax Wood Hardener. That stuff does penetrate deep into wood if you submerge the wood in it for a while. I used it on baits made of Western red cedar and poplar. These were 7 to 9” baits that were 2 to 3.5 oz. They would gain from anywhere from .15 to .35 of an ounce with dunks over 15 minutes. Prolonged dunks in the hardener did affect the buoyancy slightly. The baits sat a bit lower in the water than similar baits sealed with superglue. I suspect it made them dive slightly deeper. My baits were wake baits and shallow diving jointed swimbaits. It did not affect the action that I could tell, which may be in part due to the large size of the baits and type of wood. Cedar and poplar are more buoyant than maple. Seepage was a big problem with the wood hardener on any dunk besides a brief one. The complete drying/off gassing time depended on the length of the dunk. I submerged a bait overnight once. It took 10 days before the paint stopped getting blisters. I don’t do prolonged dunks anymore because I have to let baits sit for so long just to be sure they were safe to paint. I would put a coat of Rustoleum 2x flat white paint + primer rattle can on the baits after I thought they were dry and let them sit again for 1-2 days to see if any paint blisters developed before continuing to work on them. I suspect with the penetration you will get with vacuum there could a prolonged period of seepage. I remember some posts years ago from a striper lure maker who vacuum sealed lures. I could not find the posts. His baits were also large baits, similar to Gibbs lures. He was using 20% distilled water and 80% water based polyurethane. It did add some weight but did not seem to affect the lure’s action. I believe his baits were made from poplar dowels. He was the only person I remember trying it. In addition to worrying about a change to a wooden lure’s buoyancy and action, the question is whether it is worth the extra effort (and additional equipment if you don’t have it) over the usual sealing methods and whether it is better to just use a casting resin or PVC. If you are vacuum sealing wood to pull all the air out of wood and replacing it with a sealer you are essentially changing a fundamental characteristic of wood (the air inside it) and essentially turning it into a resin-like product. Vacuum sealing never seemed to catch on as a way to seal baits. Maple is denser than the 2 woods I use. You would also be removing more of the air with vacuum as opposed to dunking. I think it would have some effect. I would weigh the wood before you seal and weigh it again after you have sealed to see if you gain more than 10% in weight. Maybe you could make some identical baits, vacuum seal some and seal some with superglue. After the baits are sealed and hardware is installed, you could compare how they sit in the water and their action. There are some videos on YouTube on vacuum stabilization of wood. I don’t know if these would provide any useful information. They all seem to use an epoxy like product called Cactus Juice. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWflb2KILIM&t=768s
    1 point
  17. Same for me for the most part. But sometimes you want a small profile spinnerbait that runs deep. You can wait and let the bait sink down and reel slow to keep it down. Sometimes the small blades don’t spin well at such a slow speed. By going slow, you also cover less water. In the past, I would add weight to the hook. I have an assortment of the hidden weight spinnerbaits for that now. You could also be on a trip where you couldn't bring all your gear and don't have access to a tackle shop. I have had to add weight to a lure in a situation where your gear is limited. It's definitely not ideal but you have to make do with what you have with you.
    1 point
  18. I don't add weight to spinnerbaits. I either go up one size weight, or if it is running to high then reel slower and if it is running too low, then reel faster. It is that simple. You can control where your spinnerbait should be by doing this and letting the fish tell you if they want a fast or slow retrieve.
    1 point
  19. One advantage to having the weight added to the hook is that it gets more weight toward the back which helps with casting distance as that weight will lead the way on the cast. It's one of the reason an egg sinker is put on the wire shaft first (at the bottom) when building a bucktail. With the spinner body and hook weight being at the end it also cuts down on center of gravity tumbling in the air problems. On a spinnerbait or single hook spinner it can be easier to add weight to the hook. You can wrap lead wire around the hook or squeeze on a rubber core weight with the rubber remove. On spinnerbaits, bucktails or roostertail type spinners, the skirt/dressing is before the hook and hides the weight.
    1 point
  20. William. A fisherman may try to adapt or modify a lure in the field by adding weight to a hook or by putting a weight ahead of the lure on the line using some kind of swivel or leader to get the bait to sink deeper or cast further. Adding weight will effect action by imparting drag and will change retrieval angles etc. I would not say that hook weighting is a preferred option. But it may give someone a chance at putting a lure in the strike zone when you don't have any other options available.
    1 point
  21. A cheap, durable, easy-to-use clear coat for jigs and spinnerbaits is Dollar Store clear nail polish. It cures hard enough to fish overnight. I don't use in on my power coated baits, since powder coat is almost bullet proof by itself, but I often paint jigs and spinnerbaits with Createx air brush paint to get more complicated or different colors than the powder coat I have. After priming them with Rustoleum Self Etching Primer, I paint them with the Createx. Then I top coat them with the nail polish. It holds up for years. If one does get nicked, it's a simple matter to touch it up and then use it again the next day.
    1 point
  22. I can't make toast in the morning and your suggesting I use a soldering gun lol
    1 point
  23. Welcome to the site. I mostly use .051" stainless safety wire (also called stainless lockwire) when there is a chance at fish over 10 lbs. I use wire from Malin or Wire & Cable Specialties (WCS). It's good for wire-through baits and making twist eyes. I sometimes upsize the wire to .062" on big baits 7 inches +, and 3+ ounces. I will downsize to .040 on smaller bass lures. I sometimes use .092" screw eyes on medium size lures 1-2 oz. When I use screw eyes, I try to get the eye of the screw countersunk into the body of the lure a bit so my epoxy will reduce the chance of the eye opening up. I don't like going with the smaller screw eyelets.
    1 point
  24. I have been successful by placing masking tape over the pattern trace out the design ,place the cut out on the tape, make the cut out a little larger then the traced form. By making the cut out a little larger your going to have an over lap but just a slight one. It's easier to find the border I trim with a sharp razor blade. A dull blade will bunch the tape. It's work intensive and slow. But, it works. I'm always looking for better ways.
    1 point
  25. Would somebody on here who has tons of money start a company here in the U.S. that makes skirt material. This covid crap is killing me. Been wanting to make an order from fishing skirts.com since September of 2020 and 95% of items are still out of stock. Was told in an email to them on February 7 they had an order on the way. It must have got lost. Lurepartsonline can't even keep inventory of their own exclusive colors. And forget about anything that remotely resembles Magic Craw. Sorry for the rant, know its not their fault.
    1 point
  26. Ben was an amazing person. Always willing to help and spread his knowledge. Its with an extremely heavy heart that I read this and I hope he is in a better place and happy. My heart and prayers are with you and your family Sir!
    1 point
  27. I just received a dear customer letter from Skirts Plus explaining the current situation for them. Covid and all the related issues in the supply chain. They go on to say silicon suppliers have doubled their lead times and increased their prices up to 300% in some cases. So the shortage isn’t getting better and the prices are going up. Hope everyone has a pretty good stock.
    1 point
  28. Jim does amazing work. He posts a lot on do-its forums & tries to help everybody out by explaining how to do about everything he does when it comes to jigs.
    1 point
  29. As a disclaimer, you probably shouldn't put flammable material like wood inside an oven and leave it unattended, and you should also look up the flashpoint or autoignition temperature of whatever you're working with. I have used a 300 degree oven to dry black walnut, sitka spruce, red cedar, padauk, mango, goncalo alves and eastern hard maple without any problems. Nevertheless, don't burn down your house and then say I told you it was safe to do so!
    1 point
  30. Torrification is a more involved process that uses higher temperatures and a zero oxygen environment, but for the average home woodworker the results are more or less the same. Bringing the moisture content of wood down to zero makes it much more resistant to future changes in humidity. In some woods, particularly the spruces, bringing the moisture content to zero with heat causes the wood's resins to crystallize and gives the wood a higher strength to weight ratio, but also makes it more brittle. The only reason I know about this stuff is because most of my woodworking experience has been in building guitars. Using the heated drying process on the spruce soundboard of an acoustic guitar gives an instrument that has a more desirable tone and is much less prone to deformation due to humidity changes.
    1 point
  31. LPO is Lure Parts Online. Unless you need that particular weight spinner body right away, it's not really worth the effort of gluing 2 weights together. Unpainted lead bodies or finesse sinkers are fairly cheap. https://www.lurepartsonline.com/Lead-Lure-Bodies_2?quantity=1&custcol_beads_eyes_paint_size=78
    1 point
  32. Here ya go Mark. Post your results! https://custombaits.com/index.php?topic=13596.msg102088#msg102088
    1 point
  33. If I EVER make a jig that beautiful, I would be scared to throw it. Do you know how he does it?
    1 point
  34. Water only helps the reaction proceed faster and anything above the needed amount has no impact on strength. Most materials contain enough water on their surface to start the polymerization reaction and of course we have the ambient humidity. The majority of strength is gained within minutes. Then up to 24 hours is need for full cure. Most wooden baits, depending on the area of the country are going to have moisture content of 6 to 12% (for most 10 to 12% would be safe bet) and more than sufficient for the needed polymerization reaction. Where most encounter issues is they use too much superglue. Only need a thin coating on the surface. Wetting the surface will make the reaction go faster initially but too much water and you negatively impact the bonding ability of the superglue to the intended substrate. Plenty of information on cyanoacrylate glue and performance out there. Superglue is fine for hook ties, thru wire, undercoat on balsa cranks etc....
    1 point
  35. Nice video , had no idea changing colors could be so easy . I need to take a break from my fly tying and art project so this will be perfect this weekend , melt some lead pour some spinnerbaits and jigs . Thanks for Jungle Jim info too So many things to do ...
    1 point
  36. I don't think the topcoat will matter as long as the wax mid coat is used. As Anglingarcher said, the key is using a wax that does not have cleaners in it. KBS was asked about by someone in the comments. He said " The best results are from using the floor wax but...it still becomes slightly dull. To answer your question, yes you can coat it with KBS over the floor wax."
    1 point
  37. Salam everyone, use crayons it's cheaper and look fine Already try it Idea from this nice person : Enjoy
    1 point
  38. The first body i made consists of a 3/4 ounce barrel weight and a ~1/4 ounce bullet weight. I wanted to paint them, so to keep the pattern consistent I glued them together with some gel super glue. It held fine for a handful of test casts. Once I get the design right I'll clear coat them together for added security. I'm going to test it with a different blade, because the one I used was too small. If it still doesn't work I'll add beads. I'll get a picture up when I get one working.
    1 point
  39. Remember that there is so much more than wattage. You need to consider the wavelength put off and the required wavelength for the specific UV Resin you are using. Most UV sources have a fairly wide range of waves, but most also have a sweep spot that is strongest. I prefer 365 nm for what I use. Remember also that distance from the light is super important. If you double the distance between the light and the lure than you only have 1/4 the light strength. Yep, the strength of the light is inversely proportional to the distance squared. So, if Bob and Mark and I use the fingernail light curing lights, our lures are about an inch or two from the light. Let's assume that our lights are 10 watts each, and we have four lights in the device for a total of 40 watts. Now, assume Killintime uses his lights, 2 of them at 30 watts each. That is 60 watts total. Will his 60 watts cure his faster? Actually, I bet he is at least 4 inches from his lures, so his energy is only 1/16 as strong as ours (or about that, I'm tired and going by mental math LOL). So, our 40 watts compare to his 60/16 or less than 4 watts. Consider this when building some form of UV curing device. Engineered Angler has a good contained system but his is not the only style. The number of his lights, and the UV range, and the distance from the lure all make a huge difference.
    1 point
  40. Do you use matte or gloss colors? I'm excited to watch the video!
    1 point
  41. Bob, I do the same.
    1 point
  42. T_man7 - nailed it Dave
    1 point
  43. Quick video of the rod dryer I built this morning https://youtu.be/DEZ-BVFDhfo
    1 point
  44. Never used it, but most slow cure epoxy products hold up over time and most fast cure get brittle and yellow over time. If it is fully cured in 30, I suspect it will yellow in about one year. If 30 minutes is the working time, it should be good.
    1 point
  45. OK, I dug up some old and a few new attempts with convex and concave lips. As we know there can be a lot of variables in action and depth with just one lip shape- I wonder why it's not used a lot more ''Text'' is on each photo, just in case I can't post this many pictures here -----hope this is legal, otherwise I will post them in my attachments, or somewhere?? Pete **** SORRY, pic's 4 and 5 should read ''Concave Lip"
    1 point
  46. Back when I was playing around with moving ballast I made three "identical" crankbaits, using an already successful design. All of those had a concave forehead, leading to the back (I misspoke when I said concave back) . They had a tight Xing (wiggle) and ran down to 6'+-. Without the concave the same bait would only run down 4'+-. The moveable ballast was at the kill spot. The higher the ballast, the more erratic the bait would act on the retrieve (hunting).
    1 point
  47. At Rowhunter's suggestion, I'm starting a PVC thread. I use it for all my lure building, for the following reasons: It is totally waterproof, so I can shape a lure, and then test float and ballast it without any sealing. I have a 3 gallon bucket of water in my driveway that I use for test floating. It is buoyant. The Azek PVC decking is as buoyant as poplar, a hardwood I used to build my jointed swimbaits from. The Azek trimboard is even more buoyant, like medium density balsa. I can make really active shallow cranks with it. It is strong. The decking is as strong as any wood, for lure building, and the trimboard, although not as dense, is still plenty strong enough for any crank. And I use it for my smaller two piece jointed lures, too. I caught a 7lb largemouth with a PVC trimboard spybait I made that was 4" long, but only 7/16" thick, and I had drilled several 3/16" holes up from the belly for my ballast. She ate the rear hook, and the bait held up fine. Both are strong enough to hold screw eyes with just a small pilot hole. No need for any reinforcement, or setting into holes filled with epoxy. I usually use the gap filling/brush on super glue alone to set my hardware, and a lot times my bills, too. I use the accelerant (thank you Ben) dripped onto the glue to help it set quickly, once things are positioned. It machines and carves well. Although the sanding dust is nasty, because it sticks to everything, including my sinuses, PVC is easily machined and shaped with the same tools I used for wood. As with any work, sharp tools work best. I cut out my bait profile, and lip slot, with a bandsaw, and try to drill any ballast hole while the bait has the flat sides, so I can drill straight holes with my drill press. I use an oscillating belt sander with an 80 grit belt to do my major shaping, working from a centerline I put on the bait after I've sanded the bandsaw marks off. I "carve" details with a dremel sanding drum, and drill out my eyes with a multi-spur bit on a drill press. I typically sand down from 80 grit to 120 grit with a vibrator sander, and finish up with a small piece of sandpaper to get edges and details softened. Because it has no direction-oriented grain, it carves really well with sharp tool. It can be laminated into bigger lure blanks using the same PVC glue plumbers use for PVC pipe, or you can use super glue. If you use both the PVC primer and the glue, the two pieces actually melt into one solid piece. As long as the two surfaces are flat and mate, you're good to go. It paints well. I can shoot Wicked White as a base coat onto a raw PVC bait, heat set it, and never have any separation problems with my paint schemes. When I've had occasion to remove some paint to modify a bait, I've had to sand down to the PVC to get the paint off. It never peels. Occasionally, heat setting too hot can cause trapped air to bubble up under the seal coat, so I generally seal baits by rubbing crazy glue, or thinned epoxy, over them before I paint, if I want a super smooth bait. But any bubbles that do appear can be popped by the sharp tip of an exacto knife, and they lay right back down when I press them with my exacto knife handle. I've never had any baits with popped bubbles fail. And, because it is totally waterproof, I don't have to worry about nicks and scuffs from rocks and hooks. Any top coat works. I've used epoxies, urethanes, and concrete sealers, with no problems. In short, it make lure building faster and easier, and that make it even more fun, so why I use it.
    1 point
  48. I haven't seen anyone post that you can use eye make-up from your wife's purse, but that would work great for you. Just add small amounts to your plastic before you heat it. It's not the cheapest colorant out there but for sure will make some great colors. Might upset the wife a bit? So have a good tarp on your boat to sleep in. jeff@mf
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...
Top