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  1. After experimenting with other woods I mostly use Tupelo and occasionally use poplar. To me they are just easier to work with. But if you not going to carve too many details basswood Tupelo and PVC would be good for floating baits, whereas poplar and other hardwoods would be better for sinking baits. Hardwoods are good for heavy floating baits, I made a spook out of mahogany and it didn’t take much wait to balance it.
    3 points
  2. 3 points
  3. I only make normal bass size lures when I can't find a blank that will fit the need. As there are of wide variety of normal size blank lures, I mostly make larger lures. I have used stainless nails for years. I got a big box of them cheap years ago. I use the stainless rods and shaft wire to have a range of diameters for pins. The Lowe's Kobalt 8" bolt cutters are decent and run $15. They make a good hook cutter too. If those can't cut a rod/nail, I go with a vice and hack saw. When using bolt cutters, I turn my head the other way and listen for how many ricochets I get around the shop. Using a sock or rag to cover the rod when cutting is a good idea. Sometimes my laziness gets the better of me and I just cut them without doing that. Safety glasses are always a good idea too.
    3 points
  4. I like using stainless steel finishing nails which are probably overkill but at least I don’t have to be afraid of failures. The only problem is they are heavy and a pain to cut (I snip them inside an old sock so that I don’t shoot my eye out haha). Otherwise I’ve heard of guys using weld rod or something equivalent.
    3 points
  5. Hi Dave, Thanks for useful input! 1 - Yes, it is too thick to pour. My solution so far has been to overfill both sides of the mold and clamp it together whilst hot. Some times emerged in hot water, if I am too slow. That way I don't get bubbles or voids. The metal mold holds heat well so it helps. I then cut away the excess plastic after cooling. (it can be re-melted, so hardly any loss) 2 - I don't really need air pockets for this bait, a sinking bait is fine. But if I was I was thinking about attaching floating, hard foam beads to the wire. 3 - I agree, not a method suited for production, but that's not my goal. I guess you could mold 8-10 baits per hour with this method if you really tried. Possibly more. Not that I am going try
    3 points
  6. This is interesting stuff, I am tempted to buy a kilo just to keep around for any future projects. There are a few problems with our application: 1 - It is too thick to pour or inject, so that means weighing an exact amount and pressing into the mold halves and closing, avoiding any bubbles or voids. 2 - The density of 1.145g/ml makes it heavier than water, so a hollow center has to be included in the mold. This means molding two halves separately. 3 - Too slow for production, but fine for own use. A 3D printed mold might work well, the flexibility will help assembling the two halves. My post reads a bit negative, but this could be fun to work with. Problems can be solved. Dave
    3 points
  7. I've found texture and pattern sheet stencils on Ebay, Amazon, AliExpress, Spraygunner and Coast Airbrush. If you want to make your own for a specific bait, check out Dakota Lakes Tackle on Youtube. He shows how to make vacuum stencils pretty easy. I find the blank stencil material at Hobby Lobby. Cut an appropriate size piece of blank stencil, place over the bait on the vacuum bed, heat with a heat gun until softened and kind of melty, then turn on the vac and suck the softened stencil material down around the bait. Once cooled for 30 secs, remove the stencil from the bait and cut in your pattern or design. I will make extra stencil molds of a bait to cut up to make masks for certain parts of the bait. I cut out the face and gill plate, and also the pec fin. These cut out pieces are your masks. I place a small piece of doubled over painters tape on the inside of the mask to hold in place on the bait. Then place my scale netting over and spray. Heat set the paint and remove the stencils or masks. The mask keeps the scale pattern from appearing on the face, gills and pec fin. Then you can use the piece of stencil you cut the pec fin out of and use it to mask the rest of the bait when painting the pec fin and keep things looking clean. The mesh material can be found at Walmart, Hobby Lobby and your local fabric store. Fabric store will have the largest selection, search for "Tulle". I use the knitting or embroidery hoops to hold the mesh tight and place over the bait to spray thru. Make sure any stencil is as tight to the bait as possible to keep overspray and bleeding to a min. Lower spray pressures help also. Hope this helps...
    3 points
  8. So I run a YouTube channel where I make baits on my 3d printer. I have all the files for each lure I make available for free. I keep getting people asking me how to actually 3d print them. I think most of the people who watch my videos don’t know how to use one. I want to do a tutorial video on how to print molds for someone who has no knowledge on the subject. I was going to focus it on resin printers as they can produce the same quality as a cnc aluminum mold for a fraction of the price. They are also relatively stupid proof and require little setup and technical know how. I want to make sure I cover most of the questions people will have and I figured this would be a great place. I was going to go over how a resin printer works, what printer to get, how to set one up, what you can make on it, and the cost vs a cnc aluminum mold. I was also going to show off the process from a file to a physical mold. Could you guys let me know what else I should cover in the tutorial for someone who doesn’t have any knowledge on the subject, I would greatly appreciate it. Here’s the link to all of the files in case one of are interested https://www.thingiverse.com/hand_crafted_angling/designs Thank you!
    2 points
  9. Please be sure to add information about what temperature you can pour in the final mold
    2 points
  10. I was also, seeing it. Last week my brother and my family visited Dad and he took us fishing. He still wears his promotional Feature Lures jacket. And he's still creating new lures, just not to attempt making a living... poor fish! ;)
    2 points
  11. Yes, a sharp knife will do it. Trout and crappie dots are a huge pain to try cutting but larger patterns like perch stripes, crawdad shell, etc are perfectly doable.
    2 points
  12. I appreciate the heads up on cutting those 2mm rods. I saw a small pair of bolt cutters at Harby freight. I've cut some 16 guage with wire cutters and look out..lol when it gives. I bought those rods because because I intend to be 2oz and above. Rat's and other stuff as they come out of me..lol. it's guy's like you that make this easier to figure out.. Thanks again. For prompt replies I also intend to be the same way.. it increases our own capacity for learning when we share what we know
    2 points
  13. I use the LPO .092" stainless screw eyes or make my own screw eyes from stainless lock/safety wire from Malin or US Wire purchased on Amazon. If there will be 2 screw eyes or the bait is under 2 oz, I go will with .051" twist wire. If it will be a heavier bait with one twist screw eye, I go with .062" twist wire eye. https://www.lurepartsonline.com/-092-Magnum-Screw-Eyes On small baits if I am using the LPO screws, I use the .072" stainless screw eyes and the 1.5mm rods, .062" shaft wire, or cut section of a nail for the pins. Those 2 mm stainless rods are very hard. I use a hack saw and vice to cut them to length. I file the ends smooth before installing them in the bait. Using a Dremel on these can be very dangerous. Cut off disks have a tendency to explode on those rods.
    2 points
  14. I will often use scissors to cut my own pattern stencils out of lamination sheets. Not the most clean or user friendly but gets the job done in a pinch. My brother owns a laser engraver for leather work, so I picked up some mylar sheet to try laser cutting. I’m hoping this will allow me to make trout dot stencils customized and sized specifically for my baits.
    2 points
  15. Getting old is not fun but definitely beats the alternative!
    2 points
  16. When I use shaft wire cutoffs for the pin, I typically use .062. I mostly make 5" baits or bigger and I like a thicker pin. You can find the .062 as well as the .051 using Mark's link above. I have just started using sections cut from stainless rods used for axles in RC cars. The 1.5mm diameter is .0591" and the 2mm is .0787". I use the 2mm rods on baits over 2 oz. 1.5mm diameter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082ZNTD4J/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&th=1 2mm diameter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08L7RKM6Q/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    2 points
  17. I have tried putting a hook on the tail of a glide and it never worked, it always affected the action. I would stick with a soft tail.
    2 points
  18. I wanted a couple more molds. Haven't tried to reach him yet. Found "Moose Ridge Molds" page on Facebook.
    2 points
  19. Very interesting explanation and novel technique. Nothing wrong with the English. Dave
    2 points
  20. I will try to make a rough guide based on my method. I made it up as I went along so probably massive room for improvement. I just use the pictures I already got. Also, English is not my native language, so things may come out wrong. Any questions, just ask. I made the molds out of tin/pewter as I melt old bowls and plates for some other lures. And I wanted the molds to be able to take some pressure without deforming. Also I left my silicone out in freezing conditions and fear it might not cure. Since the mold is made from metal at 230+ Celsius i made the masters from aluminium. Just hacksaw, files, sanding paper and patience. I also tried with a master of wood, it was very dry but it didnt work out at all. It emitted steam and got all bubbly and made a hole through the mold. It could probably be dangerous too. To make the molds I used molding sand, built a frame of some copper sheet, buried the master half way and poured molten tin over it. Then I turned it over, removed the sand and sprinkled talc powder over to keep the metal from sticking. Not sure if it is needed. Then another layer poured from the other side. After cooling the layers was easily separated and the master was not very hard to get out. In the first mold I did not make any bumps to make help aligning the two parts, but I did on the second: I also drilled some holes and fit in some screws to help out fixating the wire. Heads was removed with hacksaw, and I drilled holes in the opposite part to make room for the screws. To make the bait I melt the plastic in warm water, I also throw in the molds. I first fill the one with the wire, the attach the wire and lead. Next I fill the other mold and put them together. I use a screw clamp to squeeze out the excess plastic. If the plastic gets too hard to squeeze the two molds properly together I just throw the whole thing back in the kettle and tighten some more. Cool the whole thing in cold water and remove the excess plastic with a sharp blade. It can be remelted several times.
    2 points
  21. I was a guy on YouTube who uses modeling clay to make masters for molds. I wonder if this would work similarly? Seems like a neat product.
    2 points
  22. That one is just a regular pumpkin. Definitely not green pumpkin and I think brown pumpkin would be too dark as well. It's been years since I've made a bait, but Lure Craft regular pumpkin did the trick for me. There are other options out there that might be even better. Good luck!
    2 points
  23. One way to avoid copy - lawsuits is to make unique designs and have molds made for mass production. examples: Of course, you'll want to know which type of angler you're supplying with lures:bass, panfish, muskie, walleye, striper, etc. Lure sizes and shapes depend on the species targeted. Many anglers hold their noses when I mention small lures for large fish though I know they catch fish. Advertising and reaching potential customers is a challenge. Even getting anglers to use free samples is difficult when trying to get them to use something other than proven lures they have confidence it. Shipping costs affect sales and add to the final costs of production + consumer shipping. They are going up this week BTW. How much can you charge for a package of 10 lures taking the above into consideration? Check Amazon for examples.
    2 points
  24. If you guys need/want I actually have a set of these I can try in molds to see if they will fit. I can't promise they will fit and I do not have them to sell but I can check for fit. If you want/need to know just drop us an email with the mold number and I will check. The sizes I have are 3/0, 4/0, & 5/0. JB
    2 points
  25. buy the wife a crikt. make all the stencils you'd ever need. win win
    2 points
  26. Pour a set of weights from the mold and weigh them. Easy way to find out and then you know for sure what they weigh. Arne.
    2 points
  27. Harbor freight has them. Think they were $4 last fall. Arne.
    2 points
  28. I literally just had problems with incomplete pours over the weekend. I typically get lead from LPO and Barlow's, but a friend had some free lead from an old muzzle loader ball kit. Even after fluxing that lead, I could not get a complete pour to save my life! The melted lead seemed a lot thicker than what I typically use...even with my Lee Pot at level 10. Anyway, I ended up emptying most of my pot and refilling it with good lead from LPO. After that, I was back in business. Moral of the story (at least for me) - free lead is worth it until it isn't. -Blaine
    2 points
  29. Aluminum is an excellent conductor of heat so it is used in high performance engine blocks and cylinder heads . It pulls the heat out of the molten lead fast so the hook is not exposed to those high lead temps for very long . Think about how fast the molten lead solidifies in the cavity it's almost instantaneous .
    2 points
  30. 2 points
  31. I will give an explanation a shot. It takes a lot of little steps that make it look more daunting than it is. With practice, it becomes fairly easy. The nice thing is there are opportunities to correct screw ups while in progress. Caution – long post ahead. Coming out of the back a body section you need a loop or 2 which can be eye screws, twisted wire screw eyes, and even wire through. The 9” bait pictured has two .092 LPO screw eyes coming out of the back of the front and middle sections. Through wire can be done but requires more work if there will be more than one screw eye in the hinge. The screws should be long enough to make sure they are secure as possible. I used 2.5” long screws on this bait in the front section section due to the bait’s size. I used 2” long screws in the middle section. There is around 3/4” inch of exposed screw leaving over an inch embedded in the body. Make the screw eyes as long as possible. I could have tightened this joint up a bit and left a little less screw exposed. It was an experiment in using a swinging tail fin made from paint brush bristles. The easiest way to go is to make the screw eyes parallel. You can do non-parallel angled screws but you will have to cut angled slots which can be a pain to prevent friction. Parallel screw eyes are best at reducing friction which will reduce action. You put the screws in the center of the joint across the bait horizontally. Do not glue the screws at this point. If you use 2 screw eyes, you must locate them on the vertical axis so there will be enough room in the following section for the slots. The following section usually tapers down. If you put the screw eyes too close to the top and bottom of the front section, there may not be enough material at the top and bottom edges of the following section for the slots. You don’t want the material at the top and bottom of the following section to be too thin or it could break. If you mess up installing the screws, you can slightly bend the screw eye shafts where they enter the front section if they are off a bit. If you mess up installing them by a big margin, you can pull the screws out, fill the holes with toothpicks and super glue, and reinstall in a slightly different location. Once the screw eyes are temporarily installed, line up the following section with the front section. Put the following section into the joint beside the screw eyes. Mark where the slots will go. Cut the slots. The depth will decide how big the gap will be between the sections and the potential range of motion. There is no set distance so you have to figure what you prefer. I cut my slots with a hand saw. I then clean up the slots with small files. The spade file and square file in this kit is very useful here. https://www.homedepot.com/p/Husky-Steel-Precision-File-Set-with-Storage-Case-6-Piece-707476H/207112197?NCNI-5 After cutting the slots, I use a drill and small drill bit to scoop out some material inside the slot by drilling in on an angle from each side. Start around 1/8” inside the side edges of the slot. This gives the slot a curved back inside the lure making it easier for the top of the screw eye to fit and move. Line up the 2 sections with the screw eyes going into the slots to check if the slot depth and gap between the sections are ok. Deepen/widen the slot, tighten the screws, extract the screws a bit until you get the gap and range of motion you want. You can temporarily tack twist wire screws with soft glue or even tape. You probably want the gap to be a bit bigger than you what looks good to you to accommodate a thick clear coat on each section which will decrease the gap. Looking down from the top of the bait, mentally note the location of the holes in the screw eyes for the next step. Now you can drill the hole for the pin. You will be drilling straight down from the top of the following section in the center. Try to drill downward parallel to the pointed front of the section. How close to the pointed front of the section will vary from bait to bait. On the pictured bait which is western red cedar, there is just over a 1/4” inch of material between the hole and the front point of the section. Smaller baits will not require as much material between the pin hole and the point. After you drill through the top piece of material and just start to hit the middle piece, stop here. Take the drill out, put the sections back together for a test fit to see how you are doing so far. Use a test pin that is long enough to stick out of the top for easy extraction. If good, keep drilling. You can stop drilling just before you breach the bottom of the bait. If you go through the bottom, it does not matter as the hole can filled anyways. Once the pin hole is drilled, you can test fit again. If you need to adjust, you can elongate the pin hole a bit in the direction required with the drill. You can also use tooth picks here to fill in a messed up pin hole or even just a portion of the hole as long as you have enough material between the hole and front of the section. Just use toothpicks going in from the top and bottom for test fitting. Once you have everything where you want, pull the pin out and any toothpicks out of the pin hole. Mark the depth of the screws where they go into the front section with a sharpie. Pull the screws out so you can glue/epoxy them in. Right after the screws are set in and before the epoxy/glue sets, you can test fit again to make sure you marked the screws correctly. Make any adjustments to the screws before the glue sets. When the screws are set, I seal the sections. If you have not done so when shaping the sections, you probably want to round off any sharp edges as clear coat doesn’t cover those well. Make sure you seal the slot as it will be hard to get in there after you permanently install the pin. If you want to seal the slot here with epoxy, you will have to deepen and widen the slot a smidge with a drill/file/sandpaper to make up for the epoxy’s thickness. Install the pin. At this point, you can just cover the top and bottom of the pin hole with tape to test the bait. I use .062” or greater stainless shaft wire or a clipped off steel nail for the pin. The pin diameter depends on the size of the bait and size of the eye hole in the screws. If you needed pinhole toothpicks, put those in with the pin with super glue. Once the glue is dried, trim off the exposed parts of the toothpick. Seal any exposed toothpick caused by the trimming. You can now the fill and seal the top and bottom of the pin hole. I usually use a short piece of the middle section of a toothpick or a small wooden dowel to plug the ends of the pin hole. Seal the ends of the pin hole. Now you can test and finish the bait. Some people prefer to paint and finish each section before permanently installing the pin. When starting out, I thought it was easier to complete the pin installation and test the bait before wasting time with painting if the bait was a dud. You can just make out the pins in the pics.
    2 points
  32. I used the essential plastisol for a lot of my baits. Softener should help. Not sure it matters but Do It sells softener with there plastisol.
    1 point
  33. KBS is a thinner and hard clear coat. You can just hang your bait and no turning needed KBS can definitely have applications issues like bubbles if applied too thick. I also found that it needs to be well cured before applying another coat and the direction on the can regarding multiple coats did not work well. Storage for long periods take extra care. It is tough but I find with pike it will chip easier than epoxy. It stinks and is a harsher chemical that needs extra care Just like all clear coats it has its learning curve and down falls I have use Etex, KBS, and alumilite UV they all have their quirks.
    1 point
  34. This is how I deal with KBS and it works well I have a large rubber made with a lid that I put a wire grid to hang baits on. I throw some bunched up wet paper towels in the bottom. Hang the baits, put on the lid and tape it shut. Tapeing the lid is mostly because of the smell but it does keep the moisture in. I don’t thin KBS and I brush it on with a foam brush
    1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. Monofilament was traditionally used once Dacron fell out of favor in the 50's with Dupont patenting of Stren. Most monofilament lines are extruded above working temperatures of plastisol. Copolymers usually even higher. Trilene XT seams to be the bread and butter with those currently making prerigged worms.
    1 point
  37. Thank you! Just wanted to know if it was common or if I was going to waste a ton on custom molds I appreciate it
    1 point
  38. No experience with burned plastisol but I would soak it in acetone and then try using a tooth brush or nylon scrub pad to see if the burned material is softening. If it is, then continue soaking and scrubbing. If it's really stubborn then you might have to use more aggressive mechanical abrasives like steel wool or wire brush.
    1 point
  39. Great guys to do business with & they back up their molds.
    1 point
  40. https://www.facebook.com/FishingStencils/ i have not bought any from them, but they look great
    1 point
  41. now that im looking at the photos he sent me he was definitely trying to hide it by how he had bright light on it, because it dosnt show with light on it but you can see little bits of it in the pics so hopefully hes not gonna be hard about it, luckily i used paypal goods and services
    1 point
  42. Barlow’s spit jig is spincasted by Cast Industries. Allen
    1 point
  43. This is how I do it without an airbrush. A combination of brush and various markers. It probably takes a bit more time than the airbrush but I like the look
    1 point
  44. 1 point
  45. ttps://www.mcmaster.com/304-stainless-steel-wire Take the time and look around and learn that's how all of us gain knowledge. I but the straight wire 1 ft. long. Wayne
    1 point
  46. I would trust the epoxy over the super glue and baking soda. The super glue and baking soda combo make a great body filler but I am not sure of its holding strength. 20 lbs may seem like a lot but it is really not. The torque a big fish can put on eyelet can be more than that. The fish can use the lure's weight as leverage to snap it back and forth. A fish thrashing in a net can also put on tremendous stress on a lure. It depends on the size of the fish you are targeting. Some of the waters I fish have big pike and musky. 20 lbs wouldn't cut it. EA was getting 160+ lbs on pull tests with twist wire and epoxy. As for tallness, I think of it as more a question of the weight of the lure. A 6 inch minnow would be 1 to 2 ounces. I would use .051 wire for that. A bluegill bait of the same length would depend on the weight. Once the weight gets over 2.5 oz, I would start looking at .062 wire. It could also be a combo of wire. If I was making a big 'Shellcracker' type bait with a joint, it could be .062 for the line tie and .051 for the joint loops as there are two of those to share the stress. The pin that goes into the back section and through the 2 loops would be .062 shaft wire, a cut section of a stainless nail, or heavier stiff wire like a stainless toy car/plane axle. You do not want a hinge pin to flex. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08L7RKM6Q/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 On large baits, it don't use woods like balsa. I use cedar, poplar, and PVC. So, density is not an issue. Also, the baits are big enough that if I am using twist wire eye I can get the twists an inch and a half into the bait. The twists give a ton of surface area for epoxy to bond it to the lure. If I am using less dense wood like balsa, I would keep the wire diameter appropriate to the size of bait and try to get in longer screws or just make it wire through. You want to reduce the chances of failure as much as possible. That failure could happen on the fish of a lifetime. A failure like that will sting years later. When I make a twist wire eye, I file the end to a point. Filing takes a minute and prevents the flared cut ends from widening the pilot hole. I drill a pilot hole the same size or slightly smaller than the twist eye. The twist wire screw acts like a normal screw with a reversed thread. I can screw the twist eye into the hole with counterclockwise turning. I test fit it to make sure I have the length right, unscrew it with clockwise twists, and pump epoxy into the hole with a disposable plastic syringe, baggie with corner cut off, or pushing epoxy in with a tooth pick or scrap wire. I then coat the twists with the epoxy and screw the twist eye back in. They max out my 50 lb. fish scale and then some.
    1 point
  47. Another variant on that method (credit Hand Made Fisherman). make a container with a long spout. 1. fill it with water until the water spills out the spout. 2. dip the lure and capture the over spill in a previously weighed small container 3. determine the weight of the displaced water .
    1 point
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