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  1. Exx1976 - I do not understand you. I have refrained from posting this sentiment before. You put a lot of effort in, making excellent contributions to the TU community, gaining a lot of respect. And then, you seem to have a brain fart and chop someone off at the knees for very little reason. I am not blame free, I too have had my moments of indiscretion. I suggest you think your more acidic replies through before hitting the reply button! Dave
    11 points
  2. Possibly inspired by divine intervention or alien telepathic communication, you come up with a great idea for a lure. You spend several hours shaping the body. It comes out perfectly symmetrical. The lip slot is perfectly straight. You seal the bait and get the perfect ballast placement in your test tub. You drill the ballast hole and have no wood splintering. After installing the ballast, you re-seal the lure for added protection. You are so excited about your creation you decide to take the lure to the unfrozen portion of a small river on a cloudy dreary 30 degree day to test the action. Yo
    7 points
  3. here are some videos, not the best but you get the idea. https://youtu.be/KPsVzycUTf0 https://youtu.be/YY0KLwPxOkY https://youtu.be/XjENNdaTFR4
    6 points
  4. As I do not build gliders or jerk baits, all that I can do is throw a lot of theory out there, to help you understand how the lure works. Understanding the theory helps the builder to design a lure to take advantage of the forces accordingly. Of course, experienced glider builders will have already figured this stuff out even if they do not know the reasons why their lures work. Experience is a valuable tool, theory only gives you a ‘leg up’ at the start. As you have already figured out, this is a very complex issue with multiple factors to be taken in to consideration. The appar
    6 points
  5. In my post about getting the screw eye holes in the EXACT middle of the lure, I had mentioned a jig I made for use with a flush trim bit on a router table. It occurred to me that some folks might like to see it. So, here it is: Used 1/2" plywood for the base, and did the profile for the back of the lure on the band saw and then the belt sander. Drilled 5/16" holes, then used a forstner bit to recess the heads of the t-bolts so it would sit flat on the router table and the t-bolts wouldn't scratch things up. Used a 3/8" trim bit to rou
    5 points
  6. Gained about $2000 or more in sales last year just by giving away a handful of blemish lures at lakes that cost me maybe $100 in materials. It’s even better when the father of the kid calls me to buy some lures because his kid out fished him that day. Nothing sells lures better then fisherman seeing them catch fish I tell every kid that I give a lure to it’s their lure and Dad is not allowed to use it Think of it as investing in advertisement
    5 points
  7. @Skeeter what I know that is different about it is that it was designed to have no toxic fumes because several well known lure makers had died of cancer and Joe, the guy that developed it, did so as a response to that. As far as anything about the product that makes it more suited to lure making I am not sure. It does work like a charm though. First time using it and I got the best, nearly flawless topcoat I’ve ever gotten:
    5 points
  8. Rubbish, the dolphin showed no interest in the lure what so ever! Just kidding, great work, looks amazing Dave
    5 points
  9. I work for a large company in a product development role. I can tell you this, the bigger the company the less they care if the product "works" right. What they need to do is sell stuff profitably good bad or otherwise. Most have great ideas internally that never see daylight due to timing, market or whatever. Personally if i had a great bait that i could reproduce consistent quality catches and is manufacturable, you'd be better off doing an LLC. There is enough power in social media these days to not need the big companies anymore. Its a great time for entrepreneurs imho.
    4 points
  10. Let me rephrase that. They come out of the mold & they are oilier when warm until they've had time tocool & cure, but after a little time i really like the results. I think it's a little clearer than the calhouns too. Anyway it being a different plastic & me getting use to the slight differences between it & calhouns i'm completely satisfied with the baitplastics stuff.
    4 points
  11. Gliders will glide better if tapered, better as in farther. The more torpedo shaped the better in that respect. A lipped crank bait can be either, but as Hillbilly said, shape can and will change action (some better and some worse).
    4 points
  12. I have a different opinion on what it takes to do this for a living. If you don’t like what you are doing now then it makes it easier to maybe change. While all the other posts are spot on there is another option. While it’s nice to have your own product and put them in shops you could on the other hand pour for someone who has the task of selling them. Most people here will tell you it is very hard to make a profit making baits but I know some who make a lot of money doing so. And it is much more than you might think. I will not mention exact numbers because you need to know that it is a lot
    4 points
  13. First you need to be brutally honest with the numbers. Many guys aren't. The time spent, the cost of materials, etc.. all end up disappearing when they think about how much they are making. One also need to look at what they really make at their job including benefits. I will use the average US salary of 38K (I don't consider this as a well paying job). Currently I get health insurance, dental and vision insurance, 10 paid holidays, 4 weeks paid vacation, sick time, short term disability, long term disability, 401 k match, social security, gym membership, life insurance, bonus, and ot
    4 points
  14. I wouldn't be concerned with the tape, but with what’s under it. Raw wood? Foam? Expanded pvc trim? I make wood baits and foil them. There has to be a waterproof/gas proof coating under the foil or any heating of the lure will cause outgassing and bubbled foil (whether heated by you when finishing the lure or by the user storing the lure in a hot compartment).
    4 points
  15. I guess if I was in the lure business, mine would be labelled 'NOT made in USA'. Dave
    4 points
  16. JD - The spherical domain enclosed by the tall man's spell of 4πr³/3 is an intriguing and fascinating subject. It is the simplest shape and yet the most difficult to carve. I have actually experimented with spherically derived shapes and the resulting actions are interesting. If you pull a sphere through water you get a pure spiral action. I do most of my cranial development work while sleeping, so you could say that I work in an alternative universe Dave
    4 points
  17. You are correct and many would find making baits is a losing endeavor if they put any dollar value on their time. Building cranks one off is about the least efficient way to make cranks. Multiples pay off as less time is wasted setting up tools, measurements, etc.. Some aspects are rather quick so may just knock out a bunch of blanks for future use. May take 30 minutes and drill all the hook hanger and belly weights, etc.. (jig holds the blank in position on drill press). I will just keep blanks in plastic shoe boxes or shallow tool box trays in different stages. If ti
    4 points
  18. People do not buy hand made baits because they are cheap, they buy because the lure is unique and of the highest quality. Your bait has to gain a reputation for catching MORE fish than the chunk of plastic on the shelf at Walmart. Yes, you need a pro angler on board who believes in your lure. A Kevin Van Dam is not going to get the job done, people will not attribute his success to the lure but to the man himself. I would take my lure to a struggling pro, get him to try the lure, prove that it is a fish magnet, then you can both retire on the lure's success. Only my opinion; cha
    4 points
  19. This is a tale of multiple ‘happy accidents’ making a memorable lure. I have a bond with this lure that is tempting me to not retire it, even though it belongs on the wall now. My favorite lure is one I call Dicky Moe after the whale in a Tom & Jerry cartoon. The cartoon whale was the first thing I thought of when the lure was finished. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bttiQVVweJE It is all white, 9.75” long, and weighs 3.1 oz. without the hooks. The bait came out longer than expected because I forgot to take into account the joint gaps would add close to an inch of length
    4 points
  20. If those are your first baits man you are well on your way! They look great. In my day job I am a network engineer so I can appreciate the fact that you used the two sides from an old computer case for your painting booth. That's awesome man:) You have for sure found yourself in the land of bait makers here. Everyone here is extremely helpful and listening to their advice will only make you better at this amazing hobby. There have been so many good tips provided here and I'd like to give you a couple as well. Just a couple of tips to make things easier for you I guess. I used to have HP
    4 points
  21. There are a bunch of different types of lipless crankbaits. A flatfish is just one type of many different types of lipless cranks. The one in your pic was a common style years ago similar to the Heddon Bayou Boogie, Pico Chico, Storm Whiz Bang, Buckeye Shad Lipless Crank. Poe's also made a lipless back in the day similar to your pic. Although some of the older style baits are still being sold, that older style seems to have fallen out of favor since the Rattle Trap type baits gained in popularity. Your pic does have the line tie lower than most of the older baits. The pictured lure'
    4 points
  22. RPM - It must have been a huge buoyancy force to have that effect, as you stated. The other clue is the 'thumping' action. This is an indication that the lure is swimming at a very steep angle. The drag from the lip is very high but the down force is small. The optimum angle is around 45 degrees for maximum depth. This smaller angle presents less lip, so less thump but more down force. To achieve this, your tow eye needs to go further forward. Dave
    4 points
  23. Easy.... You have to invest in machinery and tooling and take the human element out of it.
    4 points
  24. Just wanted to send a thanks out to all the peeps who answer the same questions over and over for those of us just starting out, the money you guys save us newbies is one of the only ways we can afford to get into this hobby! I’ve been reading the forum for a month or so, this is my first post. Haven’t really needed to ask anything, you guys have covered everything I can come up with. Thanks again, really appreciate it!
    4 points
  25. 051 would be a good diameter..you could go up to 062 but that would be a bear to bend...Nate
    4 points
  26. I've tried the adhesive backs stuff.... like hvac tape and such - WAY thicker than the stuff I'm using. For something large or a flat side crank the HVAC stuff is not bad - but no where near as "flexible" for the really contoured stuff. I use a light spray of Super 77 - then press this thin foil down, working it with my fingers to get it as flat as I can over half the bait.... I then use popsicle sticks I've sanded/shaped to press and burnish it down into the details and rub flat the wrinkles as best I can. In some instances this stuff will rip if your a little too physical with it....
    4 points
  27. Most of the major brands have a wide array of colors. It is hard to just single out one brand. SK has a lot of colors I like. 6th Sense makes some nice ones too. When I make a lure, the color just comes down to personal preference or perhaps to fill a hole in the color spectrum that I can’t buy elsewhere. I repaint some brand name lures with black or black with blue flake because that color is hard to find in a hard bait. At night, dawn/dusk, and in muddy water, black is usually a great choice. A lot of people use a certain color based on confidence. I think that becomes a self-fulli
    4 points
  28. Good reply Anglinarcher. My prey are bawal, a deep bodied very aggressive fish, which explains why I only need a belly hook. Dave
    4 points
  29. Tough question for sure, and a lot of personal opinion is involved. Personally I think it depends on the size of lure, the type of fish you are after, even the type of lure you are making. I should take more time to explain myself on this, but this is the short version. (This could take a chapter of a book to explain) On species that are less aggressive, like many freshwater trout species, I find that the tail hook is important. On larger lures, lures that often work much better than people think, the trout will tail tug or test the lure first and tail hooks really up-the-catch rate.
    4 points
  30. I have two new lure building spreadsheet tools available: 1 - TU resin lure calc – Designed to help with the amount of filler (MBs) and ballast required to achieve the required buoyancy without having to resort to many trial and error builds. 2 - TU wood lure calc – As above but designed for carved lures (wood, PVC or other). Many members have the Ballast Calculator, an older tool. I feel that No2 above is a better tool for this job as it takes into account internal and external hardware as well as ballast. So if anyone requests the Ballast Calculator in future, I will del
    4 points
  31. Check out this video from Jekyll Baits on YouTube, seems like she achieves a similiar effect.
    4 points
  32. I use one of two ways, depending whether the bait is one part or jointed. For one part I use papertrick, shown below. First, I trace the bait to a peace of paper and cut it out. Then I fold it in half, find the balancing point and press my pen through. Then I mark the point to my bait. Easy way to find center of gravity for one part bait. For jointed baits, I always find the CoG for each segments. I could use this paper trick to find the center but then there's an weight distribution problems... So I use this method below instead. I'll
    4 points
  33. Weather is acting up so no testing yet for my lightened spoon. It means, I'll go forward with this design. Kinda mimicked an Roach fish here. Pretty basic color scheme, just a tad of fluoriscent red, blue and green on the sides which shows depending the lighting. Next step would be obviously epoxy coating but also making the stinger setup. Not sure how much it inhibits the swimming action but we'll see. Have to test with fluorocarbon, leader wire and Kevlar thread would also be one option. I know all of these are being used in these kind of baits so just have to test which
    4 points
  34. SB paints dry fairly quick, usually you can handle them in 5 to 10 minutes. Dry time is affected by how much paint you lay down and ambient conditions as well. Some residual tail solvent will take longer to completely leave and it is recommended to let them dry over night before packing if doing so. As far as the other Post there is something else going on as it shouldnt be tacky, need more info on that one. See above. Same applies to for all SB paints as Clear 3000. The addition of SB Coat Retarder if needed will slow dry time, the amount added will determine the final dry time. The p
    4 points
  35. I would love to jump in on this post, but everything I want to say has already been said. Dave
    4 points
  36. With a pure clean ingot dross should be minimal. If your buying from a reputable refiner such as Rotometals here on the USA it should be really clean. But for scrap lead from a scrap yard or anywhere else it will vary every time.
    4 points
  37. I've had good luck with baltic birch plywood. Not the normal plywood from home depot. Normal plywood uses low quality plies in the middle. Baltic birch uses high-quality plies all the way through. I got mine at Rockler woodworking store. They sell smaller pieces (1ftx2ft) so you don't have to buy a whole sheet. No problems with grain, it finishes fairly smooth and then wipe on layers of lacquer and final dip in floor wax to get gloss finish. The plies show up as alternating light/dark lines that help you keep symmetry. You can get pretty fine detail. If I wanted super fine detail I'd
    4 points
  38. azsouth, I also have experiemented with this phenomenom and I'll try to reply post or relay as best in short as possible. Dave Vodkaman peaked my interest so I challenged myself and here are my findings best described in short terms. Building hunting crankbaits are a challenge, but with his knowledge and scientific approach it was acheivable and honestly more acheiveable than I thought, but Hunting crankbaits are not for everone! I have a fishing partner that cannot stand a hunting crankbait because they have a sweet spot for speed, maybe not his but he agreed they do have a place. I also
    3 points
  39. A good wife is priceless in this game. I showed Tessa a video of a hunting lure being exercised in the apartment swimming pool. She didn't seem impressed, remaining silent. I played it again and then asked her thoughts. She replied, "Why you put fish in swimming pool, it will die and make water dirty"! Best confirmation of a realistic action ever Dave
    3 points
  40. I build baits in batches of 6 and I use Rod Bond paste epoxy, the original slow cure variety, to glue in hardware and lips. It’s strong and waterproof and stays where you put it. Plus, I can mix up a batch and easily install 6 lips before it begins to harden. For lips, I push the paste into the slot with a thin wire until its filled with epoxy, then push in a dry lip. The excess squeezes out of the slot at the rear of the lip and is easy to wipe clean. Do not butter the lip before insertion as that causes a mess on the front of the lip. The slow cure time (6 hrs to begin, 24 hrs to finis
    3 points
  41. Curt - I am confident that this year will be different and EVERYONE will read the rules and follow to the letter. Good Luck Dave
    3 points
  42. Simple crank bait. This bait is the first one I've used True Coat epoxy on and I'm a fan! Goes on nicely, don't have to rush at all and is very clear.
    3 points
  43. ... ... If anyone needs a tester* in northern Illinois you just let me know! *said tester is not a professional and has absolutely no social media presence outside a YouTube channel with 2 subscribers. Said tested is also has a very poor quality camera and cannot guarantee any good photographs of the successful use of your lure. Said tester has 4 sons who are very energetic and enthusiastic about fishing, but not particularly focused (especially the 2 month old).
    3 points
  44. A quick video highlighting a few modifications to my 10" WEN 3962 bandsaw http://rvbprecision.com/machine-tools-welding/wen-3962-bandsaw-modifications-walk-around.html
    3 points
  45. So I finished my first batch. Thank-you everyone for the advice. Worth it's weight in gold. Quite happy with the way the run. Made MANY mistakes along the way. Not happy with how blotchy the epoxy set. I made a rotisserie, and hit them with a heat gun - but not the most ideal finish to be honest (30 minute epoxy). My eyes aren't the size I wanted - I had ordered some online, and are"6-8 weeks behind" on shipping. I had to pivot and get other ones - that don't fit the way I want. I used an avacado bag for the scales - my template didn't show up. I need a good firetiger template.
    3 points
  46. For some reason, I could not post to this thread until now. I was getting Error code: 1S160/2 I have had some failures that should make any lure maker feel better about themselves: 1. I made a one piece glide/jerk bait out of a piece of wood. It looked like oak. I only put in a couple of small ballast weights. I did not test it before finishing. The lure sinks faster than a piece of lead. I drilled most of the lead out, touched up the paint, and it still sinks fast. In an attempt to re-purpose it, I added a line tie a third of the way down the back to vertically jig it, like a bi
    3 points
  47. Yup, I will use 5 minute epoxy, then fill in any imperfections or lead holes with superglue/baking soda, or car body filler (bondo). If you have a large deep slot and don't want to use tons of epoxy, I will epoxy in the wire (enough to cover the wire), then with some strips of wood, I will mix more epoxy and fill the slot with epoxy and the strips of wood making sure they are completely covered on all sides with the epoxy. Here is a pic of what I mean: Welcome here!
    3 points
  48. Cheap is never good and good is never cheap...
    3 points
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