Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/16/2021 in all areas

  1. Exx1976 - I do not understand you. I have refrained from posting this sentiment before. You put a lot of effort in, making excellent contributions to the TU community, gaining a lot of respect. And then, you seem to have a brain fart and chop someone off at the knees for very little reason. I am not blame free, I too have had my moments of indiscretion. I suggest you think your more acidic replies through before hitting the reply button! Dave
    11 points
  2. #6 Don't quit your day job.
    6 points
  3. here are some videos, not the best but you get the idea. https://youtu.be/KPsVzycUTf0 https://youtu.be/YY0KLwPxOkY https://youtu.be/XjENNdaTFR4
    6 points
  4. I have a different opinion on what it takes to do this for a living. If you don’t like what you are doing now then it makes it easier to maybe change. While all the other posts are spot on there is another option. While it’s nice to have your own product and put them in shops you could on the other hand pour for someone who has the task of selling them. Most people here will tell you it is very hard to make a profit making baits but I know some who make a lot of money doing so. And it is much more than you might think. I will not mention exact numbers because you need to know that it is a lot of WORK. Yes that four letter word. Working with small larger company’s can be very profitable. But never let them dominate your time because if they cut you off then you are screwed. Do less work for more company’s and all your eggs will not be in the same basket. You will have to understand how you utilize your time is key to making baits. Waiting is not an option you need to keep doing something to get ahead. Keep your day job for say 6 months. Take the rest of your time investing in to your bait business. Get to a point that you can have enough molds and a system to pour that will get you where you need to be. Whatever system you use to pour you need to be able to change colors fast so you don’t have to wait. With a small guy you have to do smaller runs and multiple colors a day to make it work. For much more on how to do it you can pm me and I can enlighten you for days. Your dream can happen and you can do it if you want to WORK.
    5 points
  5. Gained about $2000 or more in sales last year just by giving away a handful of blemish lures at lakes that cost me maybe $100 in materials. It’s even better when the father of the kid calls me to buy some lures because his kid out fished him that day. Nothing sells lures better then fisherman seeing them catch fish I tell every kid that I give a lure to it’s their lure and Dad is not allowed to use it Think of it as investing in advertisement
    5 points
  6. Yep, the Deep Secret. Probably the deepest diving small body lure. Speed Trap body, trench digger lip. There's nothing wrong with casting it once you get past the lack of a weight transfer chamber, some helicoptering, and the lip causing the lure to sail off course in random directions on nearly every cast.
    4 points
  7. I would suggest moving your line tie a little higher on the nose and try that before changing lip location. Personally I think your lip needs to be moved forward some also. I've had to move a lip forward before to get a bait to wake better. I had to remove the old lip, fill the slot and cut a newer slot a fair amount forward. We called it the Frankenbait, as it had been cut apart and glued back together in various places, but it worked afterward. As Dave and JD above stated, try a shorter, wider lip. I've found those tend to get a taller profile bait like a gill, to wake better. The lip you're showing will want to make the bait dive or crank down, IMHO. Depending on how you have the bait ballasted, how low it floats in the water will also effect how it swims. Mine worked best as a very low float, barely floating with the back just out of the water, throws a great dual wake. The lip and nose create the big V wake and the tail will create swirling vortiscies{sp} to each side, inside the V wake. I would move the front hook hanger back a hair also, looks like the front treble will hang up on the lip when casting. That's a great looking bait, nice carving and paint, get er' waking and she will get crushed!! Here are a couple pics of a gill wake I made after moving all the components to get it to wake nice. This is a resin bait BTW, 6 inch long and just under 5 oz. Good luck moving forward with this bait and Happy Holidays to all!
    4 points
  8. I've not seen anything for spindle blanks. But there are plenty of CNC wood engravers that you could make half sides of crankbaits with to make mold masters. You could also probably make halves of any lure to though wire. I've contemplated this but never pulled the trigger and i just do low volume and like to carve lol.
    4 points
  9. Never used it, but most slow cure epoxy products hold up over time and most fast cure get brittle and yellow over time. If it is fully cured in 30, I suspect it will yellow in about one year. If 30 minutes is the working time, it should be good.
    4 points
  10. Here is a gill detail I came up with ( at least have not seen before ) , I am making a top water and flat sided crankbait and will be layering a light color next to collar and darker on top for contrast . Think this will be cool detail
    4 points
  11. If one person was always right he/she would own the fishing industry, but that is not the case!! We all have had great years followed by not so great years.... as conditions change from year to year so does the fishing.
    4 points
  12. Like most opinion pieces put out by fisherman I believe some of it holds merit but a lot of it is just opinion biased on his fishing style My opinion attraction is based on flicker/flash, noise/vibration and overall visibility true triggering traits are that show weakness/opportunity or create the fish to fear a loss of opportunity. Weakness is a pause, fall, or small twitch showing struggles to move. Drawing on a now or never response is a long pull/jerk, variation in speed and veering to the side Above is the main factors I consider when creating a lure and what I choose to fish with. Water color is acknowledged but I also consider how close my presentation will be to the fish. For example I have caught lots of bass in muddy water flipping dark color lizards into cover. I have also had great results trolling Lakers with bright noisy crank baits in crystal clear water One I am dropping on the fishes nose the other I am drawing fish in from a distance There is a ton of other factors I consider but it would be writing a novel lol We all have our opinions and in the end if it works keep doing it. If not change something
    4 points
  13. I work for a large company in a product development role. I can tell you this, the bigger the company the less they care if the product "works" right. What they need to do is sell stuff profitably good bad or otherwise. Most have great ideas internally that never see daylight due to timing, market or whatever. Personally if i had a great bait that i could reproduce consistent quality catches and is manufacturable, you'd be better off doing an LLC. There is enough power in social media these days to not need the big companies anymore. Its a great time for entrepreneurs imho.
    4 points
  14. Let me rephrase that. They come out of the mold & they are oilier when warm until they've had time tocool & cure, but after a little time i really like the results. I think it's a little clearer than the calhouns too. Anyway it being a different plastic & me getting use to the slight differences between it & calhouns i'm completely satisfied with the baitplastics stuff.
    4 points
  15. Gliders will glide better if tapered, better as in farther. The more torpedo shaped the better in that respect. A lipped crank bait can be either, but as Hillbilly said, shape can and will change action (some better and some worse).
    4 points
  16. First you need to be brutally honest with the numbers. Many guys aren't. The time spent, the cost of materials, etc.. all end up disappearing when they think about how much they are making. One also need to look at what they really make at their job including benefits. I will use the average US salary of 38K (I don't consider this as a well paying job). Currently I get health insurance, dental and vision insurance, 10 paid holidays, 4 weeks paid vacation, sick time, short term disability, long term disability, 401 k match, social security, gym membership, life insurance, bonus, and other perks. At one time we also had an ESOP plan that added up to a nice chunk of money after a few years. I work 40 hrs a week. So for me to quit I have to match the effort and total compensation above. Everyone is different just something to include in thinking. For some it wouldn't be as difficult as they may be covered on spouse insurance, don't worry about life insurance, retirement, etc.... Add start up costs, depreciation of equipment, write offs, etc...into the equation. So yes it can be done. Statistically you will not be successful but the more thought and research you put into it the more likely you are to succeed.
    4 points
  17. I wouldn't be concerned with the tape, but with what’s under it. Raw wood? Foam? Expanded pvc trim? I make wood baits and foil them. There has to be a waterproof/gas proof coating under the foil or any heating of the lure will cause outgassing and bubbled foil (whether heated by you when finishing the lure or by the user storing the lure in a hot compartment).
    4 points
  18. I guess if I was in the lure business, mine would be labelled 'NOT made in USA'. Dave
    4 points
  19. JD - The spherical domain enclosed by the tall man's spell of 4πr³/3 is an intriguing and fascinating subject. It is the simplest shape and yet the most difficult to carve. I have actually experimented with spherically derived shapes and the resulting actions are interesting. If you pull a sphere through water you get a pure spiral action. I do most of my cranial development work while sleeping, so you could say that I work in an alternative universe Dave
    4 points
  20. You are correct and many would find making baits is a losing endeavor if they put any dollar value on their time. Building cranks one off is about the least efficient way to make cranks. Multiples pay off as less time is wasted setting up tools, measurements, etc.. Some aspects are rather quick so may just knock out a bunch of blanks for future use. May take 30 minutes and drill all the hook hanger and belly weights, etc.. (jig holds the blank in position on drill press). I will just keep blanks in plastic shoe boxes or shallow tool box trays in different stages. If time really becomes important and you don't mind switching media. Taking a master and molding it a few times will allow you to really kick out finished baits in a hurry.
    4 points
  21. People do not buy hand made baits because they are cheap, they buy because the lure is unique and of the highest quality. Your bait has to gain a reputation for catching MORE fish than the chunk of plastic on the shelf at Walmart. Yes, you need a pro angler on board who believes in your lure. A Kevin Van Dam is not going to get the job done, people will not attribute his success to the lure but to the man himself. I would take my lure to a struggling pro, get him to try the lure, prove that it is a fish magnet, then you can both retire on the lure's success. Only my opinion; charging $10ph is not doing you or your lure's reputation any good at all, you might as well just give them away. No, I am not rich. I cannot afford to live in my birth country of UK and certainly could not afford to live in USA. A few years ago, I lowered my charge rate to $25ph to do some mold design work. I regretted that decision, it stuck in my throat and formed an indigestible knot in my belly. I vowed never to do that again. My last paid design job was $100ph although I could be tempted out of bed for $70ph for a short engagement. Like I said, not rich. My philosophy was always work to live, not live to work. Here is a quote from George Best: "I spent a lot of my money on booze, birds and fast cars, the rest I just squandered." Dave
    4 points
  22. This is a tale of multiple ‘happy accidents’ making a memorable lure. I have a bond with this lure that is tempting me to not retire it, even though it belongs on the wall now. My favorite lure is one I call Dicky Moe after the whale in a Tom & Jerry cartoon. The cartoon whale was the first thing I thought of when the lure was finished. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bttiQVVweJE It is all white, 9.75” long, and weighs 3.1 oz. without the hooks. The bait came out longer than expected because I forgot to take into account the joint gaps would add close to an inch of length because I used big gate eye screws for hardware. The V cuts for the joints don’t mesh perfectly and are ‘close enough’. I made numerous mistakes during its construction. I was so disappointed with its appearance that I was ashamed to fish with it initially. Dicky Moe was my first attempt at a big bait. I wanted to make it a simple design. I started with a section of 1-1/8” diameter poplar dowel. I just rounded the nose and tapered the back half of the bait down a bit. It is clunky and amateurish. I screwed up the eye sockets. I eyeballed the locations with a hand drill (no pun intended). The eyes are not in the same spot on both sides. The drill bit walked making the edges of the sockets jagged and not perfectly round. The lure looks a bit cross-eyed. I made another mistake in sealing the bait. I soaked the body sections in MinWax Wood Hardener for a day. Wood Hardener will work a sealer, but it has a long off-gas time. I did not know this at the time. Soaking the sections for that long probably requires a month of off-gassing with that stuff. This would cause the paint and clear coat to separate from the body later on. I finished the parade of screw ups when I installed the lip. I was trying for a 70 degree angle. I cut the slot too big for the Lexan. I used 2 pieces of blue tape like tent rope supports to hold the lip in place while the epoxy cured in the slot. The lip shifted and I ended with an 85 degree angle lip, just slightly forward of straight 90 degree down. The lip ended up being slightly tilted, not straight across the bait. The lip reminds me of a snowplow blade, titled to push the snow off the road. Despite its ugly appearance, it has great action. It wriggles and clacks on the surface. The sections whack against each other. With my rod tip down, it bulges just below the surface. It makes a big wake. In its debut, I caught 3 fish on it, all largemouth, 2 to 3.5 pounds. After that first trip, some off the painted lifted from the body. This problem would pop-up throughout Dicky Moe’s life. Through the years, I would peel off the lifting section, cut it off with a razor blade and patch that section with random white paints and epoxies. The lure is now has uneven color ranging from bright white to some spots that have ambered. The clear coat is uneven due to overlapping patch jobs. I keep catching fish on it including several over 5 lbs. Years ago, I decided to not strip the paint. I have just kept on patching it. I don’t want to strip the paint and possibly ruin Dicky’s mojo. Dicky Moe was responsible for one of my favorite fishing memories. 3 years ago, I was fishing off the dock at my parents’ lake house. They were having an extended family bbq with over 30 people attending to celebrate my oldest uncle’s birthday. I decided to take a few casts while waiting for food. My relatives made numerous jabs about the ‘ridiculous’ size of my lure. On the second cast, I caught a 2.5 lb. largie which surprised my relatives. I was then able to respond with “never doubt the master”. A couple of minutes later, as the lure was no more than 10 feet from the dock, the lure got hammered. The strike was like someone threw a bowling bowl in the water. After a brief but intense fight, including a massive tail splash that sprayed me, I landed a 7.2 lb. largie which stunned everyone. There is nothing quite like catching a big fish in front of audience that was mocking your lure. Dicky Moe has a special place in my heart. It continually reminds that a lure’s appearance does not necessarily relate to its effectiveness. It has provided faithful service for a decade. It will probably go on the wall this year. One of the big gate screws does not look secure anymore. When I die, I want to be cremated with this lure along with some my other favorites. This pics don’t really show how mottled the paint is. One pic is with a SK 2.5 squarebill for a size comparison. After looking at the pics, I never noticed how crooked and misplaced some of the eye screws are.
    4 points
  23. Today I made my 16 year old kid sit down with the fluid bed from TJ's, 5 of TJ's removable cups, and 5 jars of 2 oz Pro-Tec powder paint. I told him to make it work and show me each color when he had it right. He got all five colors working great. He took the full TJ's cups and dumped each back into it's original Pro-Tec jar. He then took one color at a time and added powder to to the cup a little at a time and played with the air until he got it fluid. The trick for him was to add about 1 oz. to the TJ's 2" diameter cup. He showed me every color and they were all fluid. If you tipped the cup to side it was as fluid as a liquid. Took him about half a hour and when he was done, he asked me if there was anything else I needed him to do. If any else has problems, I suggest you get a kid to do it!
    3 points
  24. This is an update to an older post. It is long so I made a new post. Luhr Jensen Speed Trap – old vs. new, and the new Norman Speed N. Pre-2006 Speed Traps were made in the USA. The new ones are made in China. I compared 4 old ones to 4 new ones. In my unscientific opinion, I think the new baits are made with the same butyrate plastic and in the same or similar molds. The plastic feels and looks the same. The clear coat on the new baits does appear to be different from the old baits. The clear coat on the new baits is thicker. This resulted in slightly different dimension between the old and new baits. The diving depth for all 8 models appeared to be around 7’ on 12 lb. Yozuri Hydrid Line. The actions of the new and old baits seem identical. I fished all baits on the same rod with the same reel. The vibration from bait to bait was the same. I was fishing in 7 feet and just ticking the bottom. The rattle sound seems similar across all 4 pre-2006 baits. Three of the new bait sounded like the pre-2006 baits. One of the new baits seemed a bit fainter than the old ones. The tone of the rattles in all baits is similar. Molding ‘dents’ All of the old baits and 2 of the new baits have what appear to be small ‘dents’ where the plastic sagged into the body during the manufacturing process. The dents on the older baits were far more numerous and far more pronounced. Two of the new baits had no dents. One new bait had one very slight dent. The other new bait had two very slight dents. (Older baits) Pre-2006 - Black - has two dents on the belly in front of the hook hanger, a dent on the starboard side of the nose, and the starboard side of the tail. Pre-2006 – Metallic Perch - has two dents on the belly in front of the hanger, dents on the starboard side and port side of the nose, a dent on the starboard side of the tail, and a slight dent on the back near the top on the starboard side. This is the oldest bait in the group which I believe was made in the late 90s. Pre-2006 – Crystal Mudcraw - has two dents on the belly in front of the hanger, a dent on the starboard side of the nose, and a slight dent on the starboard side of the tail. Pre-2006 – Bluegill Perch (with orange sharpie on belly) - has one large dent on the starboard side of belly in front of the hanger. This dent is the largest and deepest by far. It looks like and inverted water drop. It also has dents on the starboard side and port side of the nose, a dent on the starboard side of the tail, and a slight dent on the back near the top on the starboard side. (Newer baits) Post-2006 – Blue chrome - has no body dents. Post-2006- Gun Metal Shad – has a very slight dent on the starboard side of the belly in front of the hanger and another very slight dent on the starboard side of the nose. Post-2006 – Breeding Bluegill - has no body dents. Post-2006- Mossback Craw – has a very slight dent on the starboard side of the belly. Because the few dents on the new baits appear in similar spots to where they occurred in the old baits seems to me that they are still made the same. Luhr Jensen must have figured out a way to mold the bodies with far fewer dents/sags. Clear coat On the 4 older baits, the clear coat is thin and uniform with no fish eyes. The clear coat on the newer baits is thicker. There are ‘fish eyes’ in the clear coat on two of the new baits so you can see that it is thicker than the old clear coat. Measuring the length and width of the body and thickness of the lip also indicate the clear coat is thicker on the new baits. The thicker clear coat may increase the durability of the new baits compared to the old ones that would not likely survive an errant cast into an object. This is not a complaint about these baits. I really like the bait. There are usually at least 5 in my tackle bag in different colors. They are very thin walled and were difficult to manufacture. The quality on the new baits has definitely improved. I have fished these baits for 20 years and have caught multiple species on them. The new ones and the old ones both are great fish catchers. The have a very tight wiggle that draws some vicious strikes. They are very stable and don’t blow out even on fast retrieves. The only disappointment I have in the new baits is they discontinued the Metallic Perch color - gold chrome perch pattern with the green chrome on the shoulders and orange on the belly. It doesn’t show well in the pics. It is a deadly bait in the Northeast as it looks like several of the local baitfish. INCHES Lip **** Pre / Post OUNCE Body Body Port Starboard 2006 Color Weight* Length** Width*** Thickness Thickness pre Black 0.334 2.6135 0.7210 0.0845 0.0845 pre Metallic Perch 0.322 2.6040 0.7185 0.0845 0.0845 pre Crystal Mud Craw 0.328 2.6210 0.7220 0.0840 0.0840 pre Bluegill Perch 0.340 2.6000 0.7205 0.0850 0.0850 AVG 0.331 2.60963 0.72050 0.08450 0.08450 post Blue Chrome 0.330 2.6460 0.7440 0.0970 0.0970 post Gun Metal Shad 0.363 2.6395 0.7450 0.0950 0.0955 post Breeding Bream 0.341 2.6395 0.7465 0.0955 0.0950 post Mossback Craw 0.358 2.6390 0.7445 0.0960 0.0955 AVG 0.348 2.64100 0.74500 0.09588 0.09575 Norman Speed N New Evoo 0.463 2.69800 0.82400 0.07300 0.73000 * Weight with no hardware. ** Length of body of plastic measured from above tail loop to noise point *** Body width just behind belly hanger **** Lip thickness on both sides as close as possible to center hump on the bottom side of the lip Norman Speed N vs. Lurh Jensen Speed Trap The Speed N is a new lure very similar to the Speed Trap. The Speed N is close in size to the Speed Trap with a similar action. The Speed N is also made of butyrate. The Speed Trap is available in more colors. The Speed Trap also has some bluegill colors and chrome colors which the Speed N does not. Hopefully, Norman will add more colors in the future. The Speed N is made in Guatemala. The Speed Trap is made in China. The Speed N dove to around 5’ on the same setup that the Speed Trap reached 7’. The Speed N is heavier and casts further than the Speed Trap. The Speed N I purchased had no defects. The Speed N had a tight wiggle very similar to the Speed Trap. They both have a similar lip design. Like the Trap, the N also did not blow out on a fast retrieve. I could feel the action of the Speed Trap a bit more on my rod tip. I guess I would describe the vibration of the Trap as just a bit crisper compared to the N. The Speed N did have a different rattle from the Trap. The Speed N makes more of a thud knock rattle. The Speed N has 2 chambers that run horizontally across the bottom of the bait that each house 1 fairly large ball. The balls have a limited range of motion, they can move and knock side-to-side. The Speed Trap has one medium ball in a horizontal chamber on the belly with very limited moment that provides a very subtle knock and a smaller ball free roaming in the open body that gives off a fairly high pitch rattle. I have only fished with the Speed N one time and caught no fish in 40 degree water so I can’t attest to its ability to catch fish. I have had years of success with the Speed Trap. It would be great to have a successful Speed Trap like lure that can hit shallower water. It will be interesting to see how the Speed N does next year. Neither lure performs well being dragged across 6 inches of ice. Jim
    3 points
  25. Thanks man for the tips I actually ended up molding the bait last night so I can get another one and mess around with it but I did take some of your advice and drilled a small hole and added just a bit of wait in the tail section and straightend right up. Now to mess around with the 3 piece I made. Thanks again
    3 points
  26. Let me expand on the advantages of 3D printing of baits. Once you have a CAD model that works for you, it is little more than a push button exercise to produce more bodies. There are various materials available, but I will not discuss further here, it is up to you to research. The print is slow, but for a small crank bait, 4 or 5 could be printed per run on most budget machines. We are basically talking low volume production. The HUGE advantage is that you can produce lures that are impossible by injection molding and/or casting. Features such as concave lips, lips with sharp edges, external sharp corners. You can produce 3D pectoral fins as discussed in a recent post on sculpin fish, for that extra realism. If your intention is to one day hit the BIG time and get your lure injection molded, you can emulate the injection molding and check that the lure works before spending thousands on expensive tools, there is no money back policy on tools that produce duds. Dave
    3 points
  27. Chris, you’re right that a line tie in the nose of a wood bait can be a weak point, especially in soft balsa. If you break the finish in the bait while tuning it will be a goner quickly. Rather than use a steel screw eye, many builders use hand twisted screw eyes made from soft temper stainless steel or brass, either of which is easy to bend to tune a bait. I use .041” soft temper stainless from McMaster-Carr online in standard sized bass baits. It’s easy to twist accurately and plenty tough enough to last well, and won’t break finish while tuning the bait.
    3 points
  28. I built this lathe to turn my cork handles, out of a $5.00 sewing machine motor, and $6.00 bushings.
    3 points
  29. I learned from the store "Tap Plastics" where I buy some epoxy and "lexan" scraps that it is OK to apply Epoxy over Polyester (UV resin) but it is not OK to apply Polyester over Epoxy.
    3 points
  30. We don’t need no stink’n badges!
    3 points
  31. You don't need to cure separate colors most of the time. I have one pattern, Table Rock Shad, that I have to cure the base coat first before adding the accent color. That pattern has a chartreuse body with a purple back and when I do the body and then add the purple and then cure it, where ever the purple touches the chartreuse it turns brown. So I paint the chartreuse and then cure and afterward I add the purple and then cure again with the purple and no problem. That is a rare case, most of the time the colors don't blend when curing. I use a hobby sandblaster to spray powder paint, it is like an air brush but you can't do fine detail. The good part is that you can blend colors and you can get good fading effects, watch my video on how I do this.
    3 points
  32. With small lures, members discovered that very thin fiber/circuit board lips were more effective than thicker Lexan lips in creating waggle action. The thinner the lip, the better the action. The reason for this has not been discussed much, if at all. It is all about the sharp edge. Water can flow around a round object with minimum 'peeling off' of the flow, thus minimum disturbance of the water. Conversely, flow cannot negotiate a sharp corner; it cannot change direction that quickly. This causes a low pressure area behind the edge of the lip. Water gets sucked back into this low pressure area and thus the vortex is born. At very slow speeds, the shape of the water flow is symmetrical, the same both sides of the lure. But, as the lure speed increases, a certain speed is reached were the vortices start to interact. There is not enough room for the vortices to exist independently so they take turns. The vortices start to alternate, forming one side then the other. This effect is called ‘vortex shedding’, a ‘vortex street’ or ‘Kármán vortex street’. This alternating vortex is the engine that drives the lure, causing the desirable ‘waggle’ or action of the lure. This also explains why a lure has a minimum speed before the action starts. The sharper the edge is, the stronger the low pressure area, the stronger the vortex and therefore the stronger the action. Larger lures in the range of 8” and larger will require a thicker lip in order to survive bouncing off rocks with all that body weight behind. But the thicker lip is not going to produce as much action as the knife edge lip of the 3” lure. The solution is to cut a chamfer behind the lip face. This reintroduces the knife edge and improves the vortex strength and thus the action. Another way to improve action is to make the face of the lip concave. This causes pressure to build up in front of the lip which further increases the strength of the vortex. Here is a video that shows vortex shedding, and the start transition explaining the minimum speed. Dave
    3 points
  33. Sometimes inaction is the trigger - like when a Muskie hits it on the pause. I have seen prey freeze when faced with a predator. Some fish attack a school, stunning or wounding prey. This might be another case where inaction triggers a strike.
    3 points
  34. I exchanged a few messages with Harry Simmons (sales rep for Victory) and it seems they are starting out with the most popular sizes and styles. My opinion is they are taking advantage of the covid sales boom, and the fact that often in the last year items were out of stock from older known vendors. I recently was asked to work on a project using some Victory hooks. I was sent Mustad, Eagle Claw, and Victory hooks in the same sizes. I found on testing the Victory hooks were very sticky sharp. At a glance they look very good and on pull testing they were as strong before permanent bend as similar size premium hooks. Since I do custom work and I am often asked for a "perfect" (no such thing) fit for a particular hook I started measuring across batches of hooks. The one thing i noticed is visibly there was not any real difference, but when I started measuring and fitting the Victory hooks I had slightly less consistency in exact shape than other premium hooks and even some regular line hooks. Its not horrific, but I had to make things a little sloppier. The eyes weren't consistently the same flatness. The shanks weren't consistently the same straightness. The radius and angle of the bend (90 in this case) were not perfect from hook to hook. I think for a cross over hook in a Do-It mold it would be no issue as for the most part Do-It molds tend to have greater looseness tolerance for hooks. If you have a custom mold that is a "perfect" fit for a particular hook and you are trying to cross over a Victory hook it was not made for you may need to file a little clearance or have to expect some resistance to closing the mold as it forces the hooks into the slots. Does this mean I think Victory hooks are bad? No. They are sticky sharp, and they are as strong for their wire size as any other premium hook. They are using good metallurgy What about the size/shape/fitment tolerance? It should be ok. Like I said, they will probably work just fine in mass produced molds that also have loose tolerances. At worst you may have to jiggle the mold and press a little in a custom mold crossover that it wasn't specifically designed for it. Does that mean they are no good for custom molds? No. any custom mold maker can make a mold that will fit most of any hook you choose. Just make sure they have an ample sample size to test and measure. Don't be that guy who sends one hook and says "fit this one." Does this mean I shouldn't buy Victory hooks if I'm that guy who's voice goes up in pitch when I say the word EXACTLY? Not at all. They are very good, decent price, and better than many lower end hooks from many of the major manufacturers. Beside YOU CAN GET THEM. Even when I saw other hooks as unavailable and sold out I was able to get Victory hooks. Yeah, but you seemed to go out of your way to point out their shortcomings. I also tried to point out their strengths. Every hook was sticky sharp. The wire quality and metallurgy is very good, the price is good, and they are available. Now I am going to let you in on a little secret. I have chatted with Harry Simmons off and on for years. Mostly be email and a few times by phone. I started talking with him when he worked at Mustad, and he has history going back further than that. In my opinion he's not going to keep representing a product that isn't constantly evolving and improving. As consistent as Mustad hooks are he still would talk the actual manufacturing plants trying to get better and better consistency so that every hook in a model and size was always "perfectly" interchangeable with any other of that size and model number. I doubt that he left that drive for better and better product behind. The Victory hooks are good now, and they will be getting better over time.
    3 points
  35. https://cart.saltwaterplugs.com/tail-weights.html Maybe you could use these tail weights with the cup washer. You could trim the weights to fit your lures. Maybe you can find a tail weight mold or someone who has one? I don't know if anyone on here has the mold that could make you some. I could not find the mold for sale anywhere. Maybe you could use a bullet nose or worm nose type mold instead with a piece of shaft wire to preserve the shaft hole. https://barlowstackle.com/Do-It-Bullet-Nose-Jig-Molds-P228/ https://www.lurepartsonline.com/Worm-Nose-Sinker-WNS-6-A The tail weight mold looks like this:
    3 points
  36. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUd5zpGwA5Y The loudest rattling bait I have made was based on the above video. Drill a small pilot hole through the body being careful to avoid internal hardware. Then, I used a forstner bit on each side to drill out a disc on each side just a hair deeper than a dime. I think it was a ¾” bit, maybe 5/8”. A dime should sit being just a hair under flush. Once the disc holes are drilled, use a ½” (or 3/8”) bit to widen the pilot hole going through the bait. Seal the hole with superglue. Put one dime in place and glue/epoxy it in. Once dry, place that dime side face down and drop in the biggest diameter steel ball (or 2) that will fit in the hole going through the bait. Glue/epoxy in the dime on the other side to cap the hole being careful to only get glue on disc cut. Use epoxy, super glue & baking soda, or bondo to make the dime face flush to the surface of the body. It should just need a skim coat. The steel ball will whack against the dimes which are just at the edge of the body. On a wide body bait, this will be very loud. You can downsize this set up with smaller metal discs and a smaller balls if the dimes won’t fit in the body. My local hardware store sells assorted size stainless ball bearings in the pull out box racks. You can cut small discs out of sheet metal if you can’t find any. If you have to trash a defective or broken plastic bait, make sure to smash it open and take any steel balls for future use.
    3 points
  37. I don't mean to stir this boiling pot, but I am old enough and fish enough that I have had several lures break in my day. Funny, they were normally the older two piece cheep molded lures or the through wire balsa lures. I have had the OLD wooden lures that had the poor seal coats have screws rust out, and I have had a few Lucky Craft Live Pointers where the "through wire" on the multiple joints broke. But....... Guys, they are lures, not bridges. If a few break, people don't die.
    3 points
  38. SlowFish that is the lure I mentioned in an earlier post, thanks for sharing that. There was a video on youtube several years ago that showcased and explainted the theroy and reasoning, along with action and results. Very cool. azsouth, great work explaining how you arrived at your conclusion. Several years ago when I had the test tank I had planned on trying something like this, never got around to it, to busy I guess, but great work anyway and thanks for sharing. Dave, I think we talked about this sometime ago, I was on a Japaneese Crankbiat kick and then swithced to your Hunting theroy because it called to me. Like I said in previous post's I have had success using Vodkaman's theroy and method, which in short is making the Diving bill longer and trimming it to get the desired action. There is alot more to it but that is the skinny of it. Please correct me if I'm wrong, I've even got myself in trouble or accused of absurdity when I mentioned this, the thought of tuning your crankbaits can be a touchy subject with some builders. So in general one thing I've learned from several guys here on TU, theres a lot of information that can be applied if we are only willing to think outside the box, or try something that does not makes sense at the time. When I take a dozen or more crankbasits to the lake my fishing partner and others look at me like I'm crazy and ask why do you spend so much time tuning crankbaits? HeHe! I build my crankbaits in weights, diving bill lengths, design and other ideas for a purpose, which is build a crankbiat for each application I think I need, and to try to perfect the action to the best of my ability, which does include tuning. Which brings us to whole other subject we can discuss on another thread. It's ideas, thoughts and applied science that makes this stuff happen so once agian I tip my Hat to you guys here on TU. Rich
    3 points
  39. Interesting video. I think I had the wrong idea about jerk baits, but I have never used one or built one. The video does demonstrate how the swim angle is relative to the retrieval speed, and backs up the argument that every lipped lure has a hunting speed, but this is just a side note. It looks like the most erratic action occurs when the lip is vertical, this too makes sense, as it is in this lip attitude that the hunt occurs. I guess it is nice for the lure to 'spring back' to horizontal, and for the lure to have a nice movement on a steady retrieve, but I think that these are small bonus features to the main event. Dave
    3 points
  40. Tell ya what @Vodkaman I will get Bass Pro Shops to give me that job, getting footage or lures and catches for every single one in their collection. It would be a tough job, but I'm willing to do it just to help out the fellow angler. lol
    3 points
  41. The question you ask is pretty much impossible to answer. There are so many variables from volume of lure (which is much more than just length), type of material it is made from, how fast you want it to sink, etc., etc. I will provide you an old link that has lure making details for specific lures in case you find a lure close to one you want to make. Maybe this will get you close enough to start. http://www.lurebuilding.nl/indexeng.html
    3 points
  42. When it comes to weighting crankbaits just float test them it’s so simple even I can do it cut lip slot and just pressure fit the lip. Hang hooks because they effect balance. Lastly tape or elastic band weight in assumed locations. When the lure floats level or slippery nose down you are onto something. when it comes to balance it’s all about achieving the lip angle you want for the action. Once you have the balance you can play with the weight to tighten or open the action. This is the dumb redneck way but if you prefer Dave likely knows a formal to get you within a C hair of exactly what weight and location
    3 points
  43. exx1976 I made most out of resin and some cedar. People some liked the cedar and some liked the resin ones so that is part of why I am stepping back now, I will just take my time at 78 i am not going to think to far down the line my one son shows some interest and my one grandson worked with me. I just enjoy doing it maybe one big rummage sale late summer and a couple flea markets to sell what I have. One thing at flea markets some people just want to chew you down and another comes and tells you great work with no chewing down because they say they know what goes into making a lure. Here's a good one I had a lure for 18.00 and a guy comes up and says he will give me ten I told him I already came down from 50 bucks he walked away the next guy comes up and buys two and was very happy. That's the way it goes. Wayne
    3 points
  44. Yea, if it isn't right I for sure don't sell it. They go into my tackle box, or a close friend to use and test. If it has my name on it and I sell it, I want it to have good finish. Otherwise, you will be selling all your lures for discount, or other potential customers will see a sub par product. I like the idea of giving them to kids, but yea as a musky lure maker that might be tough lol. Honestly, I don't make/paint tons of lures, so I will usually take the messed up lures, and start over with it. Put a different paint job on it, or experiment with it. I have a bunch of lures on my "wall of shame" that will never go out to anyone lol. I agree with Big Epp, I'll test something out for anyone!
    3 points
  45. ... ... If anyone needs a tester* in northern Illinois you just let me know! *said tester is not a professional and has absolutely no social media presence outside a YouTube channel with 2 subscribers. Said tested is also has a very poor quality camera and cannot guarantee any good photographs of the successful use of your lure. Said tester has 4 sons who are very energetic and enthusiastic about fishing, but not particularly focused (especially the 2 month old).
    3 points
  46. Dave, in an alternate reality, I see you working with the Tall Man from Phantasm. 'I think those spheres could be improved a bit'.
    3 points
  47. Ya, I agree. I am NOT an artist. My painting proves it. But, the fish don't care one bit. LOL
    3 points
  48. JD_mudbug & Mark I agree, Iv'e been building handcrafted lures for quite a while and have had some great success with them, but the one that sticks out to me was a tournament buddy of mine asked me to build him a pair of shallow water crankbaits for a certain situation, I built 2 and painted them in a japaneese style or version of sexy shad. He fished them the weekend after picking them up and caught over 30 bass ( 1 day ) with those lures. So I'd have to say seeing someone else, especially a buddy fish your creation and have success would be my best. I've built this particular lure for many years and fished it all over and in different situations, always caught fish but having a buddy new to the lure have success with them was really special. I always encourage anglers I come in contact with to follow thier passion or dreams in tackle crafting and take pride in helping others when the opportunity arrises. Recently I've been mentoring a young man, the son of a friend I work with, he sends me pictures all the time of soft plastic baits he's made and fish he's caught with them, always bring a smile to my face seeing him enjoy the baits he's created and the fish he catches with them. Rich
    3 points
  49. I also view crankbaits as expendable and I don’t have customers who expect (unreasonably) that they last forever. That doesn’t mean I want them to disintegrate an hour into a hot crankbait bite though. I undercoat with epoxy and topcoat with various stuff - MCU, UV resin, or epoxy. So my baits have 2 tough waterproof coatings. That’s enough for me. But all of us are “rolling their own” and if you want 10 layers of finish on your bait for some reason, well, no fault, no foul.
    3 points
×
×
  • Create New...
Top