TrashManSam

Finally putting down the rattle can

8 posts in this topic

Good morning/ afternoon everyone. 

I would like to start by introducing myself, as this is my first post, and of course it is looking for advice. I'm from Florida, and live on the flatts. So I have a very wide variety of colors that I can use effectively in the water. 

 

I picked up an iwata eclipse today, probably that last time my wife lets me tag along with her to hobbylobby...

 

I've read, and read, for days about the "basics" of spraying and maintenance of AB. Tons of info on here from you all. 

I beleive it will end up being a trial and error ordeal to get it spraying as I would like. But any cheat codes will help. 

I also picked up some opaques and one pearl silver - all are createx airbrush paint. 

Any tips on psi I should run with this particular gun? I will not being doing fine details without a stencil until I get the hang of it, along with the paint properties. 

Any info is appreciated and helpful. I've been printing and painting lures for a few years now, and since I have mastered the printers that I own, I would like to step up to airbrushing gradients instead of the spray cans and paint pens that I have been using. 

 

Again, thank you all!

 

 

Edited by TrashManSam

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Trashman. I am also a Floridian and started airbrushing baits a little less than a year ago.  I just took about two months off because we got hit real hard by Hurricane Michael, but painted a few baits this week.  I use an Eclipse air brush and some of the best advice I've seen has to do with thinning the paint to the consistency of milk.  That requires different amounts depending on the paint.  I also use Createx paint and have found that opaque white comes out of the bottle pretty thick, to the point that it won't spray at all well. I thin it with reducer and I turn the pressure up to about 35 psi. I only use that paint as a base coat.  The pearlized paints don't require as much thinning, but still require some.  I think they also require a slightly higher pressure - maybe between 25 and 30 psi. Also on the pearlized, I find it best to apply a little bit, set it with a heat gun and then apply a little more. Otherwise it gets blobby and uneven.   I think its good to do that with any paint (light coat and then heat set). The more detail and finesse I need, the lower the pressure, although I've never used anything below about 15 psi.  I put a paper covering on my work table and when I mix my paint and set the pressure where I think it should be, I test it on the paper work surface. I can adjust the consistency or pressure before I apply paint to the bait.  There are lots of decent youtube videos that can help you get started.  The folks here are really helpful as well.  Have fun!  Btw, when you say flats, are you fishing for bass in the lower end of the rivers, or fish like speckled trout and redfish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TrashManSam, welcome to the forum.  Yes there is a lot of information here on TU, about airbrushing.  But like you have probably already heard several times, there is  nothing better than time spent with the air brush in your hand. Sure you will make a few mistakes, but we all do.  Even after years of air brushing , you will still make a few.  The best thing you can do is learn to keep it clean. A clean air brush is a pleasure to use, and a dirty one will test your patience.

If you run in to something you can't figure out, be sure to ask, as most any one on the forum, is always glad to help.

Look forward to seeing some of your work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you both.

@Brick Steel, I hate to hear that about your area. I spent a few weeks in PC helping. I'm in the Freeport area, we were extremely lucky. I hope all is getting better and back to normal. Pictures do no justice to what it was like on the ground in that area. But trout and redfish, mostly trout in the choctawhatchee bay. 

 

Started spraying today! Everything seemed good and no issues with thinning besides white and black, only issue I noticed is my regulator will stay constant at 55 psi if set at 60 while spraying. If I go any lower with the regulator, it will read 30 or 40psi but drop to almost 5 while I'm spraying. It's a 30gal compressor so it isn't starving for air.  Not sure what the issue is. Either way, 2 are dipped and epoxy is drying right now! And all I can say is this is a great investment. I will make my money back in no time compared to the wasted spray paint I was using lol. 

 

I'm not sure if I am allowed to upload the pictures here. If not, do I have my own album on my profile? The mobile site doesn't show too much and I haven't been on the computer today. 

 

Again thank you both. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TrashmanSam, what tank pressure and outlet pressure are you using on your compressor. I keep my tank at about 120 and the outlet at about 100. Then I have a regulator and gauge in my shop. I have slight drops inpressure when spraying but not much. I hope that makes sense.  

There is a way to post pictures in a gallery on Tackle Underground, but I have not done that yet. They don’t like us to include pictures on these discussion boards unless they explanatory.  I would like to see some pictures of baits your doing for trout. I’ve been doing all Bass baits but would like to make some speckled trout and red fish baits as well.

As far as PC is doing, you’re right, pictures don’t do it justice. We got hammered. It’s going to be a slow recovery. We are making progress, though. Thanks for coming over to help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For your psi you are running a little high, usually a properly thinned paint will require no more than 20 psi. If your compressor is like mine, psi less than 40 is not easy to set and maintain.  To sustain the pressure the paint likes you will want an inline regulator and attache the airbrush hose to it. It is more discrete in psi setting.  For non-detail painting you can get away with a higher pressure.  But a lower pressure and properly thinned paint will help get a better "mist" and not spatter, but will take a few more coats/passes. Lower psi will also be required for detail and stenceling. 

Someone recommended this regulator here and it has worked great for me:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BR2STI/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of pictures of my set up. The lime green air hose runs from the compressor output up the wall and through the ceiling and then back down into my shop and my two in line regulators. The regulators are supposed to trap water and I have a separate valve to release any water.  This seems to work really well.  I can operate at pressures of 10 psi and have gone below.

compressor.jpg

regulators head on.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now