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sammy01007

Home Made Pressure Tank

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I was reading online about making 2 part molds and came across an article that briefly discussed building a home made pressure tank for use with casting resisns. The materials called for a "Remote Paint Tank" from Home Depot, but I can't figure out what exactly it is I am looking for.

 

Here are the exact directions & link

 

"You can make a pressure tank for around $100, all you need is a "Remote Paint Tank" from a hardware supply store like Home Depot or even Sears and some fittings to attach it to your compressor hose. You need to remove the "Siphon Tube" from inside the cover of the tank lid and you may need to make a flat floor out of wood in the bottom of the tank, mine has a rounded bottom." -http://home.roadrunner.com/~man_o_war/RTV.html

Anyone try to make a home pressure tank for casting resins?

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Sammy,

 

     Harbor Freight has a pressure pot that lots of peopel adapt for casting resins.  It is about $100.00 but they run it on sale for about $80.00 fairly often and you can use one of their 20% coupons and get a good deal.  Do a internet search for DIY pressure pot for casting resins and there is all kinds of info out there including you tube videos.   Good luck.

 

http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=paint+pot

Edited by jdr418

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Thanks jdr, I will check that out!

 

I did a search for "homemade pressure pots" and found some articles that were building pressurized canasters far scarrier than I wanted to attempt. I will try a search using your key words, Thanks again

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I got in trouble with my wife on this one, but ......

 

We have a large pressure cooker used for canning foods. When my wife was out of town, I took off the lid and taped some thin sheets of brass over the over pressure release valve. I then took the wobbler off the top that controls the pressure while cooking and I put a pressure hose on it, using a hose clamp to hold it. I pressurized it to 85 PSI from my air compressor to crush the bubbles in some clear casting I was doing.

 

Perfection!!!!

 

Was it safe? Well it was for me, but I make no promises to you! I would have purchased the one from Harbor Freight if I had known about it at the time. It is only rated to 65 PSI, but it would be easy to adapt.

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Have you tried a vacuum instead??, This will extract air out of anything, I often use it to get air out of, and the sealer deeper into wood, I use a pickle jar, works pretty good.

Just a thought ?? :oooh:  :?

Pete

Edited by hazmail

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Have you tried a vacuum instead??, This will extract air out of anything, I often use it to get air out of, and the sealer deeper into wood, I use a pickle jar, works pretty good.

Just a thought ?? :oooh:  :?

Pete

 

I tried using a food saver and during a hot summer day it actually worked with some RTV.  During normal temperatures, it failed.  How much negative pressure are you pulling on this "pickle jar"?  Can you post a pic?

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Have you tried a vacuum instead??, This will extract air out of anything, I often use it to get air out of, and the sealer deeper into wood, I use a pickle jar, works pretty good.

Just a thought ?? :oooh:  :?

Pete

 

 

My understanding is vacuums are best for RTV molds. If you use a vacuum on casting resin you are likely to increase the size of the bubbles as the resin quickly dries. Pressure chambers will crush the bubbles, making them undetectable. I am not sure exactly how much pressure I will need crush those bubbles, but according to some, as little as 20 psi is sufficient.

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Anglinarcher--Sorry but I have no idea of the vacuum the food saver pump get's down to (not a lot) but I will try and get a picture.

Also see your  problems  with resins and RTV which are a lot less viscous than the prop mixture I use, which is probably only twice the thickness of a sprayable clear mix.

Pete

Edited by hazmail

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