crazywhiteguy

Starting out Airbrushing

13 posts in this topic

whats up guys...new to the site i plan on starting to paint some of my own crankbaits. I am starting out with a Master airbrush Model G44. I plan on just sanding the finsh off of a couple of my old crankbaits and tapeing them up and painting them. i will be using createx paints. Any tips you guys could give me would be great. Does this equipment sound right? Are createx good paints to use? I know i got alot to learn but i just want to experience catching that fish on a lure you painted!!

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Sounds like you have it in hand. Unless you're painting a suspending bait, you can just lightly sand the old surface to give it some tooth instead of taking all the finish off. I recommend starting with a white basecoat to keep your colors true.

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when you are putting clear on your do you spray it or dip it? Is the drying wheel necessary? How do they dry just air dry or do you have to heat them a little bit?

Thanks alot for the help!

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Depends on the clear you select. I brush on Devcon Two Ton epoxy or dip lures in Dick Nite Fishermun's Lure Coat moisture cured polyurethane. IMO, the Devcon is closest to being a "sure thing". Measure it accurately, mix it well, and brush it on. Use a lure turner or switch ends of the hanging bait ever few minutes for the first 40 mins of cure time. You can handle it in 5-6 hrs and fish it in 24 hrs. Buy Devcon 2 Ton at Walmart in a 25 ML double syringe. Do a search here on clearcoats, their advantages/disadvantages, and how to use them. It's probably more than you can read in a week.

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ok gotcha....how long do you wait till you put on another coat of paint or from like paint to clear?

thanks alot for the help!

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The reason for heat setting each coat of Createx is so that that coats dries immediately, and you can go on to the next coat right away. You can see when the paint is dry, because it will lose it's sheen, the wet look. Too much drying is better that too little, and two thin coats is better than one thick one, because a thick coat will flash dry on the surface, but still have water trapped underneath. If the paint doesn't really dry, it stays soft and mushy, and you don't get a good surface over which to apply your top coat.

If you're using an epoxy top coat, like Envirotex Lite, or Devcon 2 Ton (30 minute, not 5 minute!), you can put the top coat on immediately after painting. I like to wait a day to be sure the paint has really dried out, but, if you're in a hurry and are sure you've dried the paint well, you can do it right away. I've done it and it worked.

Depending on what combinations of sealers, primers, paints, and top coats you use, the process of making a successful paint job can be either simple or complex.

I like simple, so I use what's worked for others before me, and has been successful.

Minwax polyacrylic sealer two coats, then dry overnight.

Krylon white primer two coats, then dry for two hours.

Water based paints Createx, Wildlife Colors, Auto Air, Apple Barrel

Krylon spray glitter heat set optional, depending on the paint scheme

D2T epoxy in my jointed swimbait joints, lapping onto the face a little

Envirotex Lite on my assembled lures on the drying wheel two coats on the faces only, trying not to let it get into the joints

This method works for me. I make lures from pine, fir, and poplar.

Other folks who work with balsa have a different system, since balsa is softer, and those using polyurethane foam use another system from those two. I've not used balsa or foam, so I can't speak to them on an informed basis.

But I've stumbled through enough mistakes on my lures to endorse the method I use for wood baits.

When in doubt, dry a little longer. An uncured layer can doom a beautiful paint job.

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Good luck!

When you make a mistake, you'll learn something from it, so don't be too pissed. ;)

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You got it.

I just spent three hours stripping off the epoxy and paint from three jointed swimbaits that I had coated with aluminum rattle can paint, trying to get a foil undercoat without all the work.

The metal in the paint made it shine, but it also made it slippery, so the next coats didn't bond. And the metal expanded when it go hot, cracking the Devcon epoxy topcoat I had used for the first time. Even a second coat of epoxy, this time with Envirotex Lite, couldn't save the lures.

Suffice it to say, it took longer to strip the lures than it did to repaint them. But I did learn what not to do.

Thomas Edison once said all the different elements he tried to use as filaments in the first light bulb that didn't work weren't failures. They were just things that he learned wouldn't work, leading him eventually to what did.

Fortunately, I haven't had to go through as many failures (thousands) as he did, thanks in large part to Tackleunderground. But there is no teacher like experience.

On the other hand, I did try Auto Air aluminum paint ( thanks Snax), and it seems to be good.

I'll let you know when I take the repainted lures out for a swim Saturday.

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NICE lets see a pic...yea i know it isnt going to happen over night. persistance will pay off. I just wanna catch a nice bass on a crankbait i painted.

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