jkustel

Anyone Have Any Sources For Ayc?

10 posts in this topic

Been building primarily with a urethane/silicone mold system for production baits but would like to start adding some wood baits to my line. Built a lot of baits in the past from poplar and even douglas fur stock but never the "holy grail" alaskan yellow cedar. (Nootka cypress) Been running a ton of searches and haven't been able to secure any sources. Read some blurbs that the Japanese are buying this stuff up. Don't know if there's any truth to it but it seems awfully tough to find. Thinking of using basswood or western red cedar if necessary but really want to at least test this wood before I get too deep into designs.

I've noticed wake baits in particular from other builders made from this wood are nothing short of phenomenal in terms of action and put off a really nice knock.

Thanks for any input.

John

Killer Instinct Swimbaits

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That's quite a website Ben...Nathan

Even I get lucky every now and then Nathan. :lol:

Ben

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I'd like to add a few words about quality of lumber and what we do with that lumber. Most lumber is graded to allow a minimum of knots and that gives the most long and wide pieces of lumber that are clear. For what most of use lumber for, unless it is high production, lower grades of lumber may be the best buy. If you pick and choose to cut around knots the rest of the wood is usually of the same high quality only in smaller sizes. Musky Glenn

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I was in Hobby Lobby today here in Tennessee. They actually had some AYC. Did not look at price. You may want to try them out there if you have Hobby Lobby stores.

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Whats the difference of Alaskan Yellow Cedar and White cedar I have several mills in the area with white cedar.

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I'm guessing here but one of the differences is geography. By that I mean where the tree grows. Alaska White ceder is probably from the northwest part of the country. Other white cedar grows elsewhere too. Looking on the internet at multiple listings white cedar is a common name. If you got a mill nearby or a source that specializes in hardwood they should know where their lumber is sourced. Big box stores and chain stores probably don't and likely had gotton something call "white cedar" (consider where they get the rest of the goods they sell). But if its all you can get, then try it out and see how it works out. The wood properties are only one aspect to how a lure will behaves in the water. I'm thinking the fish don't ask what type of wood you got in that bait if they like the action and they are hungry.

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I read somewhere that Alaskan Yellow Cedar is not an actual cedar. Don't remember the specifics other than it grows in the Pacific Northwest and is extremely slow growing with 50 to 60 growth rings per inch not uncommon. Just do a search on it in the browser of your choice and it will give you all kinds of info about it.

Ben

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It's not cedar it's part of the Cypress family..

It's also become almost an endangered species...there have been huge kills in the last several years. The average age of these trees is 5-800 years old. It is not uncommon that they grow to 1000 years +. They live in the higher elevations from northern California to Alaska up the coast. They prefer damp wet cool climates. It is not a readily renewable wood source. Once the old growth is gone it will be like many other woods that have gone the same way ie redwood etc.

Many mills not cutting it due to the economy. The diesel alone makes it double in cost to ship cross country.

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