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Ichthus

Lure Making Backyard Workshop

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I was wondering if anybody on here has a backyard storage shed that they've turned into a work shop. I'm looking to build one for myself but I've no idea where to start. What size should I build? I know it needs some windows for ventilation and electricity. I'll also probably end up storing my rods in there and making a loft or building a hoist to stow my metal framed kick boat. So what size should I get and what should I keep in mind if anybody has experience with this?

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Work shops are NEVER big enough.

 

The spare room in my new abode is only 9' x 7', so I am going to design a rotating table to mount my major tools; bandsaw, belt sander, drill press and space for one other. My general work bench will be small and on wheels, so that I can move it around. Lots of shelves is the answer.

 

Dave

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They definitely shrink as you start to acquire things but you don't need a ton of space by any means.  My shop is 12x16 and I make do.  There are space saving ideas and a good layout helps.  There are serveral woorkshop planners (wood working) that allows you to set up the floor space and layout with tools, tables, etc... to get a feel for what you are going to be doing.  Mobile bases on tools is a must for smaller shops and makes it easy to tuck stuff into corners and under other items.  In my shop I have a flip top cart with a miter saw and planner set up, next to a 5 foot work bench, and then a drill press next to it.  I have a lathe against one wall and a table saw just off center of the shop floor.  I have a bandsaw, jointer, shelving, wood storage (vertical) along that side also.  Shelves and pegboard are helpful and if you build an open roof truss you can store items up there also.

 

Some will depend on location as restrictions on what can be built or needing to file permits and have things signed off.  

Edited by Travis
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I have spent a lot of time thinking about this work area dilemma that everyone that gets into this hobby faces, its not that it requires a ton of space, more like separation...If you work with wood then obviously the dust and mess that creates will interfere with your finishing area, air brush, drying wheel...assembly area...the list goes on, so my next work area will be set up with some sort of vac system for the debris...about triple the ventilation that i currently have, so much light that it will seem like the sun is right there with you and maybe a tv...lol, because its so addicting you will never get to watch again esp. when your buddys start keeping you busy making sure they have their stuff by friday....good luck on the shop.

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I was wondering if anybody on here has a backyard storage shed that they've turned into a work shop. I'm looking to build one for myself but I've no idea where to start. What size should I build? I know it needs some windows for ventilation and electricity. I'll also probably end up storing my rods in there and making a loft or building a hoist to stow my metal framed kick boat. So what size should I get and what should I keep in mind if anybody has experience with this?

That's like saying "how long is a piece of rope?"

Decide what you want to do, how much space does each thing need, start from there. then add some space for all the things you didn't think of.

My shop is so full my wife says I can't bring anything in unless I take something out first. 

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It works pretty well, and its a way to get all your basic equipment in one area. Make sure you get one that locks up well. Also painting in the same area you shape can be somewhat difficult because the sawdust particles. Get some small organizing compartments to store your lure parts and small tools in or you wont remember where half the stuff is. Things will get scattered around pretty quick in there once you get busy.

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Ichthus:

 

Based on my experience think about the list below.  You don't need all of this stuff on day one but something to shoot for.  However, when you setup your shop do install plenty of electrical capacity.  

Make your shop a fun and comfortable place to be instead of a dusty dark spot that you will hate in a short time. Also a small refrigerator (drinks and some finishes and glue stores better when cool) Radio and or TV, seating.  The list never ends. 

 

Here is Shop Layout Tool that is offered on the Grizzly.com web site.  Click here for the Tool

 

Initial setup:

  • Bigger is better, think it over and double what you think you need as a minimum size.  
  • Paint the walls and ceiling a very light color.
  • Don't skimp on lighting and electrical outlets. You can not have too many outlets and to install now is easy. Much harder later.
  • Ventilation and dust collection, trap the dust or get it out of the shop, either is a good solution.

Things you can do later:

  • Think about dividing into two separate areas, one for the tools and dust, another for finish and assembly. Even a curtain will help a lot.
  • Consider your comfort, heat and or air conditioning. 
  • Lots of storage and cabinets.

Good luck and have fun,

 

 

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Thanks for the tips guys! I didn't consider things like dust as much as I should've and I think the vac setup is a great idea. My dad is an electrician and I'm sure he would be willing to show me the basics and help me wire the shed and light it up. I'm thinking a 12x18 or 12x16 but I will re measure and consider a 14x16 or 14x18 if enough room is available.

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I started in a 8x8 garden shed. With one extension cord and 2 clip on lights. Froze to death in the winter and died from the heat in the summer. I now have a 24 x 16 shop and it is too small now. You can never have enough outlets / power supply, light, storrage, or spots for new tools ! Ya might want to build it so its easy to add on to.

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I saw a guy use a shipping container, but can't find the photos now. 8 x 8 x 40 feet with tables and shelving running down both sides. Had AC and a wood stove with outside dust removal. Really nice setup and he only payed under $6000.00 for everything including tools. Probably has the best security out there and if you move it's easily mobile. I would use one if I had the space and the city here allowed it.

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Other things to consider:

 

1) Insulation - if you plan on working in it year-round. Makes it much easier to heat and cool.

2) Consider where you place it very carefully. I placed mine too close to a maple tree and now the surface roots are causing my shop to "warp". As soon as I recover from my biceps surgery, it will be time to tear up the floor and cut out the roots.

3) Consider building it square not rectangular. You'll get more square footage for the same perimeter. For example: a 10x10 has a perimeter of 40 feet and a total of 100 square feet. An 8x12 also has a perimeter of 40 feet but only has 96 square feet.

 

Gene

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I'm only going for a rectangular plan because, being only 16, I have to please my parents and my mom wants the shed to look like a cottage and have a porch. I'm thinking a 14 by 18 shed with an internal measure of 12x18. That way the porch has 2 or 3 feet to come out, (May add another foot to porch depending) And I will most likely have a loft to nestle some things that may not be in use at the moment.

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When my shop was built, I had to deal with height limitations due to code requirements here in CA. So no high ceilings, and no ceiling fan. A small fan in the window works great for air circulation. Track lights work great because you can focus lights where needed and a clamp on shop light like on my bench really works great. As you can see once you have wall space it gets taken up by metal lure signs. lol

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When my shop was built, I had to deal with height limitations due to code requirements here in CA. So no high ceilings, and no ceiling fan. A small fan in the window works great for air circulation. Track lights work great because you can focus lights where needed and a clamp on shop light like on my bench really works great. As you can see once you have wall space it gets taken up by metal lure signs. lol

 

The rules in Cal sucks..A friend of mine who lives in San Fran said it is now a 500 dollar fine to fart in public.....

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